Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

15 augustus
Ga naar Pagina 1, 2  Volgende
 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 15 Aug 2006 6:57    Onderwerp: 15 augustus Reageer met quote

1914 Japan gives ultimatum to Germany

On this day in 1914, the government of Japan sends an ultimatum to Germany, demanding the removal of all German ships from Japanese and Chinese waters and the surrender of control of Tsingtao—the location of Germany’s largest overseas naval bases, located on China’s Shantung Peninsula—to Japan by noon on August 23.

The previous August 6, the day after Britain entered World War I against Germany, the British foreign secretary, Sir Edward Grey, had requested limited naval assistance from the Japanese navy in hunting down armed German merchant ships. Japan gladly agreed, seeing the war as a great opportunity to pursue its own interests in the Far East. As one Japanese statesman, Inoue Karou, put it, the war was “divine aid…for the development of the destiny of Japan.” Thus the Japanese hurried to honor their 1902 alliance agreement with Britain, serving Germany with its ultimatum on August 15.

“We consider it highly important and necessary in the present situation to take measures to remove the causes of all disturbance of peace in the Far East,” the ultimatum began, “and to safeguard general interest as contemplated in the Agreement of Alliance between Japan and Great Britain.” When Germany did not respond, Japan declared war on August 23; its navy immediately began preparing an assault against Tsingtao. With Britain contributing two battalions to Japan’s force of 60,000, the Japanese approached the naval base across China, breaching that country’s neutrality. On November 7, the German garrison at Tsingtao surrendered, and Japanese troops were home by the end of the year.

The most important initial result of Japan’s entry into World War I on the side of the Allies was to free a great number of Russian forces from having to defend against Germany from the east. For his part, Japan’s foreign minister, Kato Tataki, would skillfully use World War I to redefine his country’s relationship with its most important rival, China, and to assert its supremacy in the Far East. Forcing an internally divided China to submit to the majority of the humiliating 21 Demands in early 1915, Kato extended Japan’s control over the Shantung Peninsula and indirectly over the rest of China. The Japanese economy began to boom during wartime, largely on the strength of the exploitation of Chinese raw materials and labor. As part of the post-war settlement at Versailles, Japan was given control of the Pacific Islands formerly under German rule, and allowed to maintain its hold on Shantung, at least until Chinese sovereignty was restored in 1922.

Japan’s aggressive actions against China and quick economic expansion during World War I—while the great powers of Europe were occupied elsewhere—would have far-reaching effects over the course of the 20th century. Over the coming years, ambitious militarist leaders would assert their hold ever more strongly on the Japanese government and its powerful economy, clashing brutally with China and other rivals in the Far East while readying themselves for another great struggle many of them had long anticipated: between Japan and the United States.

http://www.historychannel.com
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 15 Aug 2006 6:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 15. August

1914
Der Landsturm einberufen
Wieder ein russischer Gewaltakt
Russische Maßnahmen
Von der Ostgrenze
Die serbische Niederlage bei Schabatz
Der Krieg und die Schutzgebiete

1915
Der Nurzecübergang erzwungen
Der russische Rückzug westlich des Bug
Die Kriegsziele der Nationalliberalen
Bei der Armee Mackensen

1916
Russische Angriffe in Galizien restlos abgeschlagen
Reise des Kaiser an die Ostfront
74 feindliche Handelsschiffe im Juli vernichtet
Vergebliche russische Massenstürme am Dnjestr

1917
Der Brückenkopf von Baltaretu erstürmt

1918
Teilangriffe der Engländer und Franzosen abgewiesen
Zweikaiserzusammenkunft im Großen Hauptquartier
Italienischer Mißerfolg am Tonale-Paß

http://www.stahlgewitter.com/#chronik
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45653

BerichtGeplaatst: 15 Aug 2009 17:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Op 15 augustus 1914 begon de strijd in Dinant. Na eerst te zijn teruggedrongen door het Franse leger, bezetten de Duitsers de stad op 21 augustus. Tussen 22 en 24 augustus werden 674 burgers gedood en 950 huizen gingen in vlammen op als vergelding voor de moord op Duitse soldaten vermoedelijk door partizanen.

Lees verder:
http://www.abbaye-de-leffe.be/De-oorlog-1914-1918
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

11-15 August 1914: The Fall of Liège

The Fall of Liège, by General Leman


On the 11th the Germans started bombarding us with 7- and 10-centimeter cannon. On the 12th and 13th they brought their 21-centimeter guns into action. But it was not until the 14th that they opened their heaviest fire and began their destruction of the outer works. On that day, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, a German officer approached to within 200 yards of the fort with a signaling flag in his hand; and shortly afterwards, the siege gunners, having adjusted their range, began a fearful firing, that lasted a couple of hours. The battery on the left slope was destroyed, the enemy keeping on pounding away exclusively with their 21-centimeter cannons.

The third phase of the bombardment began at 5 o'clock in the morning of the 15th, firing being kept up without a break until two in the afternoon. Grenade wrecked the arcade under which the general staff were sheltering. All light was extinguished by the force of the explosion, and the officers ran the risk of asphyxiation by the horrible gases emitted from the shell. When firing ceased, I ventured out on a tour of inspection on the external slopes, which I found had been reduced to a rubble heap. A few minutes later, the bombardment was resumed. It seemed as though all the German batteries were together firing salvoes. Nobody will ever be able to form any adequate idea of what the reality was like. I have only learned since that when the big siege mortars entered into action they hurled against us shells weighing 1,000 kilos (nearly a ton), the explosive force of which surpasses anything known hitherto. Their approach was to be heard in an acute buzzing; and they burst with a thunderous roar, raising clouds of missiles, stones and dust.

After some time passed amid these horrors, I wished to return to my observation tower; but I had hardly advanced a few feet into the gallery when a great blast passed by, and I was thrown violently to the ground. I managed to rise, and continued on my way, only to be stopped by a choking cloud of poisonous gas. It was a mixture of the gas from an explosion and the smoke of a fire in the troop quarters. We were driven back, half-suffocated. Looking out of a peep hole, I saw to my horror that the fort had fallen, slopes and counter-slopes being a chaos of rubbish, while huge tongues of flame were shooting forth from the throat of the fortress. My first and last thought was to try and save the remnant of the garrison I rushed out to give orders, and saw some soldiers, whom I mistook for Belgian gendarmes. I called them, then fell again. Poisonous gases seemed to grip my throat as in a vise. On recovering consciousness, I found my aide-de-camp, Captain Colland, standing over me, also a German officer, who offered me a glass of water. They told me I had swooned, and that the soldiery I had taken for Belgian gendarmes were, in fact, the first band of German troops who had set foot inside the forts. In recognition of our courage, the Germans allowed me to retain my sword.

General Leman's Letter to Albert, King of the Belgians

Sir: -- After honorable engagements on August 4th, 5th and 6th, I considered that the forts of Liège could only play the "role" of "fort d'arret." I nevertheless maintained military government in order to coordinate the defense as much as possible, and to exercise moral influence upon the garrison.

Your Majesty is not ignorant that I was at Fort Loncin on August 6th at noon. You will learn with grief that the fort was blown up yesterday at 5.20 p.m., the greater part of the garrison being buried under the ruins. That I did not lose my life in that catastrophe is due to the fact that my escort, Commandant Collard, a sub-officer of infantry who unfortunately perished, the gendarme, Thevenim, and my two orderlies, Vanden Bosche and Jos Lecocq, drew me from a position of danger, where I was being asphyxiated by gas from the exploded powder. I was carried into a trench, where a German captain named Guson gave me a drink, after which I was made prisoner and taken to Liège in an ambulance. I am convinced that the honor of our arms has been sustained. I have not surrendered either the fortress or the forts. Deign, Sire, to pardon my defects in this letter. I am physically shattered by the explosion of Loncin. In Germany, whither I am proceeding, my thoughts will be, as they have ever been, of Belgium and the King. I would willingly have given my life the better to serve them, but death was denied me.

http://www.gwpda.org/1914/liege.html
Zie ook http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_liege.html
Zie ook http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?p=221312&sid=d16da1212607f7b31dac72f1cfd8b2bf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Aug 2010 16:07, in toaal 2 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

15 August 1914: The Japanese Ultimatum to Germany

We consider it highly important and necessary in the present situation to take measures to remove the causes of all disturbance of peace in the Far East, and to safeguard general interest a contemplated in the Agreement of Alliance between Japan and Great Britain.
In order to secure firm and enduring peace in Eastern Asia, the establishment of which is the aim of the said Agreement, the Imperial Japanese Government sincerely believes it to be its duty to give advice to the Imperial German Government to carry out the following two propositions:

( 1 ) Withdraw immediately from Japanese and Chinese waters the German men-o'-war and armed vessels of all kinds, and to disarm at once those which cannot be withdrawn.

(2) To deliver on a date not later than September 15th, to the Imperial Japanese authorities, without condition or compensation, the entire leased territory of Kiaochau, with a view to the eventual restoration of the same to China.

The Imperial Japanese Government announces at the same time that in the event of its not receiving, by noon on August 23rd, an answer from the Imperial German Government signifying unconditional acceptance of the above advice offered by the Imperial Japane se Government, Japan will be compelled to take such action as it may deem necessary to meet the situation.

http://www.gwpda.org/1914/japanult.html
Zie ook http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/tsingtau_okuma.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

On This Day - 15 August 1914

Western Front
Belgium: Reduction of forts at Liege completed
Germans checked at Dinant by the French.
Alsace-Lorraine: Passes of the Vosges in French hands.

Naval and Overseas Operations
South Africa: Meeting of disaffected Boers: Address by General Delarey.

Political, etc.
Japan: Ultimatum to Germany demanding evacuation of Tsing-tau (Kiao-Chau).

http://www.firstworldwar.com/onthisday/1914_08_15.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

BRITISH INFANTRYMAN 1914-15

INTRODUCTION

The British soldier on the outbreak of the Great War was part of the arguably the best trained, and among the best equipped soldiers of any European nation. He was the only one to wear any form of a camouflage uniform (the green khaki Service Dress); his load was carried in the best set of individual equipment (1908 pattern webbing) and he was armed with the best rifle in the world (Short Magazine Lee Enfield). The British Army was made up entirely of volunteers, it was highly trained, with most men able to fire fifteen to twenty-five rounds a minute from their rifles and hit a target every time. It also contained a wealth of military experience, most recently with the Boer War of 1899-1902 and conflict on the North West Frontier of India in 1908. One of its drawbacks was the size of the army; only 274,000 by 1914.

In the years prior to the Great War a plan had been developed to take a British Expeditionary Force (BEF) to a European conflict. This plan was put into operation the day war was declared, 4th August 1914, and British troops began to arrive on the soil of France as early as the next day. By the time of the BEF's first engagement at Mons on 23rd August, six infantry divisions were overseas, together with Cavalry, artillery, engineers and all the support troops necessary to keep them in the field.

By the close of 1914, the British Army had suffered 89,864 casualties since Mons. The 'Old Contemptibles' as they had become known, had been all but wiped out with some regiments losing more than 90% of their original strength. However, three other regular divisions arrived during the Winter of 1914/15, and the Spring saw the first British offensive of the war at Neuve-Chapelle in March 1915.

UNIFORM

The British soldier went to war in August 1914 wearing the 1902 Pattern Service Dress tunic and trousers. This was a thick woolen tunic, died khaki green (not the brown khaki of WW2 battledress fame). There were two breast pockets for personal items and the soldier's AB64 Pay Book, two smaller pockets for other items, and an internal pocket sewn under the right flap of the lower tunic where the First Field Dressing was kept. Rifle patches were sewn above the breast pockets, to prevent wear from the webbing equipment and rifle. Shoulder straps were sewn on and fastened with brass buttons, with enough space for a brass regimental shoulder title. Rank was sewn onto the upper tunic sleeves, while trade badges and Long Service and Good Conduct stripes were placed on the lower sleeves.

A stiffened peak cap was worn, made of the same material, with a leather strap, brass fitting and secured with two small brass buttons. The stiffener was often removed on active service, during the Winter of 1914/15.

Puttees were worn round the ankles, and B5 ammunition boots with hobnail soles on the feet. Normally black, they were made of reversed hide and had steel toe-caps, and a steel plate on the heel.

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

The 1908 Pattern webbing equipment was largely made by the Mills Equipment Company (marked 'M. E. Co' on the webbing itself). It comprised a wide belt, left and right ammunition pouches which held 75 rounds each, left and right braces, a bayonet frog and attachment for the entrenching tool handle, an entrenching tool head in web cover, water bottle carrier, small haversack and large pack. A mess tin was worn attached to one of the packs, and was contained inside a cloth buff-coloured khaki cover. Inside the haversack were personal items, knife, fork and spoon set, housewife, washing and shaving kit, and when on Active Service, unused portions of the daily ration. The large pack could sometimes be used to house some of these items, but was normally kept for carrying the soldier's Greatcoat and/or blanket.

A full set of 1908 webbing could weight 70lbs (32kg), but if worn correctly would distribute the load evenly. It was comfortable to wear, easy to maintain and adapt, and while on the march could be worn with the main belt undone while still evenly distributing the weight.

WEAPONS

The main rifle carried by British soldiers in 1914 was the Short Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE). Introduced in 1903, the .303 inch calibre weapon had a magazine of ten rounds. While it packed a heavy recoil when fired, regular soldiers before the war were trained to fire a minimum of fifteen aimed rounds per minute, and be able to hit a target every time. This rate of fire was well above any other army in the world, and most soldiers were also trained to engage targets at distances up to 1000 yards. The SMLE had a high stopping power, being able to penetrate eighteen inches of oak, thirty-six inches of sandbags and two house bricks at up to 200 yards range.

For close quarter fighting, an seventeen inch 1907 Pattern Wilkinson Sword bayonet was attached to the end of the rifle, and soldiers were trained in bayonet fighting. While the rifle could be fired with the bayonet attached, it reduced the accuracy.

WAR CONDITIONS 1914-15

The standard uniform and equipment that the British soldier went to war with in August 1914 changed little in the early phase of the war, aside from the commonplace removal of the stiffener in the Service Cap. During the cold winter of 1914/15 a variety of cold weather gear, almost entirely non-official, was worn by troops in France and Flanders, and a new trench cap was introduced known as the 'Gor Blimey' because of its ungainly appearance. This had ear muffs tied to the crest of the cap with flaps, which would come down when un-fastened and was worn well into 1916. While the SMLE remained in standard use, some Territorial battalions, and New Army units were equipped with the old Long Lee Enfield, which dated back to pre-Boer War days.

Ga voor illustrerende illustraties naar http://battlefields1418.50megs.com/uniform1.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Panama Canal Opens -- August 15, 1914

On August 15, 1914, the Panama Canal opened to trans-oceanic traffic. Due to the outbreak of World War I earlier in the month, however, there was only modest commemoration and no official visit from President Woodrow Wilson. Only a few ships a day passed through the forty miles of locks in canal in its first few years of operation; after the World War I was over, this number increased to five thousand annually.

In 1903, the United States signed the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty with Panama, which gave the United States perpetual control of the canal for a price of $10 million and an annual payment of $250,000. Work on the Panama Canal began in 1904. The building of the canal was originally under the direction of John Stevens. However, President Theodore Roosevelt found Stevens lacking as the head of the project and replaced him with George Goethels, who led construction to its completion. Goethels undertook a "lock-and-lake" plan for the canal route, excavating land on either side of Gatun Lake and constructing massive locks to regulate water levels rather than dig across Panama at sea level.

Workers cleared 50 miles of land between the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. Using primarily the labor of blacks from the Caribbean, the American construction team excavated more than 232 million tons to create the canal path. The canal's three poured-concrete locks measured 1,000 feet long and took four years to complete. Although completed six months ahead of schedule, the project was incredibly costly in dollars and lives. The United States spent almost $400 million on construction. Nearly 30,000 workers labored ten-hour days for ten years. They toiled in dangerous conditions and beset with swarms of mosquitoes bearing malaria and yellow fever. More than 5,500 workers died during construction, including 4,500 black laborers.

Initial plans for a grand armada procession through the Panama Canal upon its opening in August 1914 were cancelled when war broke out in Europe on August 3. That day the cement boat Cristobal became the first ship to pass through the canal. But it was not opened to trans-oceanic traffic until the 15th. Once operational, it shortened the voyage from San Francisco to New York by more than 8,000 miles. The process of building the canal generated advances in U.S. technology and engineering skills. This project also converted the Panama Canal Zone into a major staging area for American military forces, making the United States the dominant military power in Central America.

http://millercenter.org/academic/americanpresident/events/08_15
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Year 1914

On 15 August, the Bulgarian King Ferdinand replied to a note from the Central Powers urging him to join their alliance, saying he wanted a precise idea of the prizes Bulgaria could expect to gain. Romanian King Carol declared that should Russia make a move through Moldavia it would provoke his action against the Entente (a collective term for the Allies).

In St. Petersburg, General M.A. Belyaev replaced General N.N. Yanushkevich as Chief of the Russian General Staff.

In Tiflis, Russian Viceroy I.I. Vorontsov-Dashkov, recognizing the danger of war with Turkey, ordered the creation of a “Staff of the Commander-in-Chief of the Troops of the Caucasian Army.”

http://warchron.com/eastPrussia.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dinant

Dinant was sacked again in August 1914 by the German army. On 15 August, the IIIrd Saxon Army commanded by Baron von Hausen marched against the valley of Meuse in order to break the French positions stationed on the river between Namur and Givet. During the awful battle of Dinant, a young sous-lieutenant from the 33rd Infantry Regiment of Arras escaped death; his name was Charles de Gaulle. After two days, more than 2,300 soldiers were killed and the French seemed to have win the battle. The German command, based in the castle of Taviet, near Achêne, decided the methodical suppression of the town of Dinant as a reprisal. The destruction of Dinant caused international reprobation; as usual, the Germans justified the reprisal by the alleged presence of francs-tireurs in the town.

http://flagspot.net/flags/be-wnadi.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

AUGUST 15

The Belgian Front.
==Massive shelling of the forts west of Liège: the fall of Forts Boncelles [730.AM] and Lantin [1230.PM] - Fort Loncin blows up; General Leman is captured unconcious in the ruins [540.PM]
==Belgian observers report that German forces are crossing the Meuse en masse below Huy - Belgian forces evacuate Huy

The BEF.
==Sir John French confers with French leaders in Paris

The Northwestern and Central Fronts.
==Joffre finally allows Lanrezac to face the 5th Army northwards in preparation for possible German attacks from Belgium [900.AM]
==Heavy fighting rages around Dinant between Germany cavalry and the French 5th Army [afternoon]: Lt. Charles de Gaulle is wounded
==GQG is slowly becoming aware of the German threat from Belgium: Order No. 10 is issued [330.PM], which belatedly has Lanrezac move his 5th Army into the Sambre-Meuse angle, but still orders de Langle’s 4th Army to attack into the Ardennes

http://cnparm.home.texas.net/Wars/Marne/Marne02.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Bryce Report, 1914
Report of the Committee on Alleged German Outrages


(...) At Heure le Romain on or about the 15th of August all the male inhabitants, including some bedridden old men were imprisoned in the church. The burgomaster's brother and the priest were bayoneted.

On or about the 14th and 15th the village of Vise was completely destroyed. Officers directed the incendiaries, who worked methodically with benzine. Antiques and china were removed from the houses, before their destruction, by officers, who guarded the plunder revolver in hand. The house of a witness, which contained valuables of this kind, was protected for a time by a notice posted on the door by officers. This notice has been produced to the Committee. After the removal of the valuables this house also was burnt.

German soldiers had arrived on the 15th at Blegny Trembleur and seized a quantity of wine. On the 16th prisoners were taken; four, including the priest and the burgomaster, were shot. On the same day 200 (so-called) hostages were seized at Flemalle and marched off. There they were told that unless Fort Flemalle surrendered by noon they would be shot. It did surrender and they were released.

Lees verder op http://www.gwpda.org/wwi-www/BryceReport/bryce_r.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Action of 15 August 1915

The Action of 15 August 1915 was a small naval battle involving Ernest Jehan. In 1915, the German Empire had begun its first U-boat campaign of the First World War. U-boats operated all around the British Isles, attacking allied warships and merchant vessels. The allies therefore began conducting counter submarine activities. One of the first counter measures to be taken was the deployment of Q-ships, merchant ships armed with hidden heavy weapons to lure out and destroy German submarines.

Inverlyon, a fishing smack, was one of these vessels. Fitted with a 3-pounder and commanded by Jehan, Inverlyon sailed for enemy infested waters. While sailing off the coast of Great Yarmouth on 14 August 1915, Gunner Jehan received news that a merchant ship, the Bona Fide, of 59 tons, had been stopped by the German submarine UB-4 and subsequently scuttled with explosives by a boarding party. By the next day Ernest had rushed to the Bona Fides last known position, at about 20:20 hours, The German sub surfaced near the Inverlyon. Then from the submarines conning tower came the shouts from a German sailor. Ordering Inverlyon's crew to prepare for boarding. Naturally the Q-ship disregarded the German officer's order. Jehan waited until the sub came to 30 yards (27m) away when he gave the command to raise the White Ensign and open fire. A series of three rounds from the sailing ships gun pounded the U-boat's conning tower and bridge, taking out the German commander. UB-4 then drifted behind Inverlyon, there her gun crew fired another six shots into UB-4's hull while others raked the sub with small arms fire. The U-boat then began to take on water from the bow area, the sub was almost vertical before slipping beneath the waves and getting caught on Inverlyon's fishing net. Due to the sub being caught on Inverlyon's net, Jehan sent a message home asking if the submarine should be raised and salvaged. The Admiralty replied with a negative response so the net was simply cut, allowing UB-4 to finish sinking to the bottom. All of the crew and commanding officer, Lt. Karl Gross, were killed. As result of the battle, Ernest Martin Jehan was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on 19 November 1915,[3] and promoted to lieutenant.[4]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Martin_Jehan
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 16:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australia and the Gallipoli Campaign

15 August 1915 - By this date the 10th Battalion (South Australia) estimated that 45 per cent of its soldiers had been evacuated from Gallipoli suffering from acute diarrhoea.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/australia-gallipoli-campaign/august-1915.html

15 August 1915 - British units advanced at Suvla against the Turks on Kiretch Tepe Ridge. Little progress was made and the attackers suffered more than 2,000 casualties.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/100-events-gallipoli-campaign/august-1915.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Garrett War Diary - AUGUST 1915

15 August 1915 Sunday - Got some "bachseesh" tomatoes and grapes from passing Greeks with donkey loads of vegetables. Couldn't help laughing and sympathising with one little lad of about 12 in charge of a pony load of tomatoes, my mate who was some distance away sang out for me to double up, something suspicious approaching. Then the boy who had halted apprehensively came up and began jabbering vocally while the pony clattered all over the path with nervousness. As it was all-Greek to us, couldn't understand, but I think this gist was he had already given "backseesh" to the sentry at our camp. Anyway we took toll and just then the two patrols from the inner picket came doubling up attracted by the noise and asked what was wrong. So that was 5 "bachseesh" the poor lad had to dole out before getting to the camp boundary. We are getting "backseesh" every time a gardener passes through. I bet they would avoid doing it if they could. Camp sergeant major came up to today and took four men away from us, men are short at the base so that now we have only a corporal (acting bombardier) and six men left.

Said that Bulgaria and Greece are flying at one another in a day or two. Also that the heavy detonations we have been hearing is an 18 inch howitzer we are using. Stuck up and asked a Lieut. Colonel for his pass while on patrol today. As I had been instructed to stop all British subjects I was in the right. Fortunately our C/O came and cleared matters up much to my relief and the officer's too I think.

Down swimming on beach this afternoon and found a good issue shirt in water. Also got a loaf of bread up at rest camp, and bartered these to a Greek shopkeeper for one tin condensed milk, one tin sardines and one packet of biscuits. MacDOWALL bartered his clasp knife for one tin milk, one tin sardines. Shifted from patrol to sentry duties and now do two hours on and four off continuously.

Patrols brought in a Greek who had been acting suspiciously. He tried to dodge them and when caught was in dire terror and declared he was "English police". So he was brought in. His credentials were OK however, and it appears to be a case of Greek meets Greek. He is probably one of the agents we use to watch the inhabitants and camp followers.

Four men have been taken from us so our strength is now six men, 1 bombardier or corporal and one officer. Lieut. WATSON of Scottish Rifles. They seem to want all the men they can get from rest of camp, guards, orderlies, batman, military police etc.

Aanrader!!!!! http://www.grantsmilitaria.com/garrett/html/aug1915.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

EDITH CAVELL - Fragile Martyr

In the summer of 1914, Edith Cavell, head matron of the Berkendael Medical Institute, was on a brief holiday visiting her family in England when news came of the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand in far Sarajevo. Edith's family urged her to stay in England, but she believed duty demanded that she return to the hospital in Brussels. When she said good-bye she did not know that she would never see her family again. On 4 August the Germans invaded Belgium. Soon the hospital where Edith worked became a Red Cross hospital and wounded soldiers from both sides Belgians, Germans, French, British were cared for.

There were posters all over Brussels warning that "Any male or female who hides an English or French soldier in his house shall be severely punished." In spite of this warning, there were soon successful efforts to hide soldiers who were wounded or separated from their units, then given refuge and helped to escape to safety. In Edith Cavell's hospital, wounded Allied soldiers were tended and then helped to escape. Soon Edith was persuaded to make room for some of the unfortunates who were not wounded but merely fleeing the Germans. They too were helped to get to places where they could rejoin Allied forces. The Germans became more watchful of the comings and goings at the hospital and Edith Cavell was warned by friends that she was suspected of hiding soldiers and helping them escape. But her strong feelings of compassion and patriotism overruled the warnings and she continued to do what she thought was her duty.

On 15 August 1915, as was almost inevitable, she was arrested by the German police and charged with assisting the enemy. The Germans suspected that not only were she and others helping Allied soldiers but that the same communication lines were used to divulge German military plans --- a serious charge indeed.

Lees vooral verder op http://www.worldwar1.com/heritage/e_cavell.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Bedfordshire Regiment in the Great War
15th August 1915 - the 5th battalion's 'baptism of fire'.


On the 6th August 1915 the British and Commonwealth forces opened up a new front on the Gallipoli peninsular with the intention of breaking the deadlock that had set in at Helles and ANZAC. To that end, new landings were made in the Suvla Bay area with the idea of taking the hills surrounding the bay, attacking the Turkish Army from the rear and forcing their way to a decisive victory against their worthy enemy.

The initial landings of the 10th and 11th Divisions were fraught with bad luck, confusion and badly directed attacks, and little ground was made by the 12th August. Indeed no further ground was gained during their entire time in the peninsular.

Following a major but predominantly unsuccessful offensive to the North / East of the bay along the Kiretch Tepe Sirt on the 12th (...) the Allied commanders chose to mount a final major attack along the same ridge.

On the 15th August 1915, the 30th and 31st Brigades of the 10th (Irish) Division attacked along the ridge, with the 162nd Brigade of the 54th Division moving in protective support along the vulnerable right flank of the attack.

Having landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli 11th August, the 3 untried Battalions of the 162nd Brigade (the 1/4th Northamptons were not on the peninsular yet) were ordered into the attack on the 15th. The map below shows the Irish Divisions movements in blue and the 162nd Brigade in purple. The Bedfords had the honour of leading the Brigade, with B Company on right, A on left, C&D in support.

The 5th Battalions War Diary recorded simply; 'Battalion paraded for attack at 12.15pm with the Brigade in connection with the 10th Division. The attack arrived through with tremendous dash - hills taken & entrenched Casualties 14 Officers and 300 men.'

In addition to the 314 Bedford casualties, the other Battalions of the 162nd Brigade recorded:

1/10th London battalion; 6 officers and 260 OR's

1/11th London Battalion; 9 Officers and 350 OR's

Before the attack a young officer, Lieutenant Warren Hertslet (1/10th London Regiment), summed up in a diary letter what several thousand other men on the peninsular must have been thinking;

"I hope my regiment will make a good show. Of course it is a tremendous moment in the minds of us all. None of us know how we shall stand shell and other fire in the attack. I personally feel very doubtful about my prowess in the bayonet charge. Well, by this time tomorrow I shall know about it or shall be unconscious of that or anything else.'"

Unfortunately he, along with many thousands of other British ad Turkish troops, was killed in the following day's battle.

Mooi verhaal. Lees verder op http://www.bedfordregiment.org.uk/5thbn/5thbtnkiretchbattle1915.html

1st/5th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment - Gallipoli 1915

In their very first action on August 15 the 5th Bedfords went off with bayonets fixed and extraordinary dash, rather like Prince Rupert's Cavalry in Cromwell's Civil War. On the first objective it required really superhuman efforts on the part of two experienced officers to restore direction and cohesion. Fortunately this was achieved without sapping enthusiasm for the final charge on a feature known as Kidney Hill.

'It was a great and glorious charge, but the position was won at terrible cost. The whole advance had been made with bayonets fixed and when the final stage was reached and the order to charge rang out the men dashed to the attack. There was no stopping these unblooded British troops; London, Essex and Bedford Territorials charged together, but the men of the 5th Bedfords outstripped the Regiments on their right and left and dashed into the lead, causing the line to form a crescent and sweeping everything before them. Turks went down before cold steel in hundreds, and those who were not killed turned and fled.'

If Kidney Hill did have any tactical importance commanders and staffs seem to have lacked the skill to exploit its capture. The Battalion account reads rather sadly that they held on to it for forty-eight hours, with A skill and tenacity which would have done credit to Regular troops, and were then withdrawn so that the line could be straightened out. And straight it seems to have remained until the evacuation of the Peninsula four months later. When it became apparent that there was to be no quick success at Gallipoli optimistic 'Western Front' voices were raised again. Chief of these was General Joffre. All through the summer of 1915 he had been quietly planning an autumn offensive. The British Government and the British commanders were unenthusiastic as the scale contemplated was such that some of Kitchener's new divisions would become involved before they were deemed ready.

On the other hand we could not argue that these divisions were wanted to exploit a success against Turkey which hadn't materialized.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Regiments/BedsRegimentGallipoli.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Aug 2010 20:30, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Messages
From Commanding Officer 4th Light Horse (Lt Col Leonard Long)
To Headquarters 2nd Light Horse Brigade


15th August 1915 - About 0100 our artillery fired a few shots in what appeared to be the direction of the Olive Grove. In reply a few small shells were fired at our trenches from the direction of Pine Ridge. No damage was done. The officer on duty at 0100 received a report that a body of the enemy were moving from their left flank towards Lonesome Pine. A sharp lookout was kept but nothing unusual was observed. Deepened trenches and saps.
Casualties one wounded

http://percysmith.blogspot.com/2007/04/chapter-8-gallipoli-5-17-august-1915.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE TREATMENT OF ARMENIANS in the Ottoman Empire 1915-16

Documents presented to VISCOUNT GREY OF FALLODON, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, By Viscount Bryce


LETTER FROM THE SAME SOURCE, DATED CONSTANTINOPLE, 2 /15th AUGUST, 1915, AND ADDRESSED TO THE SAME ARMENIAN RESIDENT BEYOND THE OTTOMAN FRONTIER.

Since I wrote my last letter (of which you have acknowledged the receipt), we have been able to obtain more precise information from the provinces of the interior. The information with which we present you herewith is derived from the following witnesses : an Armenian lady forcibly converted to Islam, and brought by an unforeseen chance to Constantinople ; a girl from Zila, between nine and ten years old, who was abducted by a Turkish officer and has reached Constantinople ; a Turkish traveller from Harpout ; foreign travellers from Erzindjan, and so on. In fine, this information is derived either from eye-witnesses or from actual victims of the crimes.

It is now established that there is not an Armenian left in the provinces of Erzeroum, Trebizond, Sivas, Harpout, Bitlis and Diyarbekir. About a million of the Armenian inhabitants of these provinces have been deported from their homes and sent southwards into exile. These deportations have been carried out very systematically by the local authorities since the beginning of April last. First of all, in every village and every town, the population was disarmed by the gendarmerie, and by criminals released for this purpose from prison. On the pretext of disarming the Armenians, these criminals committed assassinations and inflicted hideous tortures. Next, they imprisoned the Armenians en masse, on the pretext that they had found in their possession arms, books, a political organisation, and so on---at a pinch, wealth or any kind of social standing was pretext enough. After that, they began the deportation. And first, on the pretext of sending them into exile, they evicted such men as had not been imprisoned, or such as had been set at liberty through lack of any charge against them ; then they massacred them---not one of these escaped slaughter. Before they started, they were examined officially by the authorities, and any money or valuables in their possession were confiscated. They were usually shackled--either separately, or in gangs of five to ten. The remainder---old men, women, and children---were treated as waifs in the province of Harpout, and placed at the disposal of the Moslem population. The highest official, as well as the most simple peasant, chose out the woman or girl who caught his fancy, and took her to wife, converting her by force to Islam. As for the children, the Moslems took as many of them as they wanted, and then the remnant of the Armenians were marched away, famished and destitute of provisions, to fall victims to hunger, unless that were anticipated by the savagery of the brigand-bands. In the province of Diyarbekir there was an outright massacre, especially at Mardin, and the population was subjected to all the afore-mentioned atrocities.

In the provinces of Erzeroum, Bitlis, Sivas and Diyarbekir, the local authorities gave certain facilities to the Armenians condemned to deportation : five to ten days' grace, authorisation to effect a partial sale of their goods, and permission to hire a cart, in the case of some families. But after the first few days of their journey, the carters abandoned them on the road and returned home. These convoys were waylaid the day after the start, or sometimes several days after, by bands of brigands or by Moslem peasants who spoiled them of all they had. The brigands fraternised with the gendarmes and slaughtered the few grown men or youths who were included in the convoys. They carried off the women, girls and children, leaving only the old women, who were driven along by the gendarmes under blows of the lash and died of hunger by the roadside. An eye-witness reports to us that the women deported from the province of Erzeroum were abandoned, some days ago, on the plain of Harpout, where they have all died of hunger (50 or 60 a day).

The only step taken by the authorities was to send people to bury them, In order to safeguard the health of the Moslem population.

The little girl from Zila tells us that when the Armenians of Marsovan, Amasia and Tokat reached Sari-Kishila (between Kaisaria and Sivas), the children of both sexes were torn from their mothers before the very windows of the Government Building, and were locked up in certain other buildings, while the convoy was forced to continue its march. After that, they gave notice in the neighbouring villages that anyone might come and take his choice. She and her companion (Newart of Amasia) were carried off and brought to Constantinople by a Turkish officer. The convoys of women and children were placed on view in front of the Government Building at each town or village where they passed, to give the Moslems an opportunity of taking their choice.

The convoy which started from Baibourt was thinned out in this way, and the women and children who survived were thrown into the Euphrates on the outskirts of Erzindjan, at a place called Kamakh-Boghazi.(19) Mademoiselle Flora A. Wedel Yarlesberg, a Norwegian lady of good family who was a nurse in a German Red Cross hospital, and another nurse who was her colleague, were so revolted by these barbarities and by other experiences of equal horror, that they tendered their resignations, returned to Constantinople, and called personally at several Embassies to denounce these hideous crimes.

The same barbarities have been committed everywhere, and by this time travellers find nothing but thousands of Armenian corpses along all the roads in these provinces. A Moslem traveller on his way from Malatia to Sivas, a nine hours' journey, passed nothing but corpses of men and women. All the male Armenians of Malatia had been taken there and massacred; the women and children have all been converted to Islam. No Armenian can travel in these parts, for every Moslem, and especially the brigands and gendarmes, considers it his duty now to kill them at sight. Recently Messieurs Zohrad and Vartkes, two Armenian members of the Ottoman Parliament, who had been sent off to Diyarbekir to be tried by the Council of War, were killed, before they got there, at a short distance from Aleppo. In these provinces one can only travel incognito under a Moslem name. As for the women's fate, we have already spoken of it above, and it seems unnecessary to go into further particulars about their honour, when one sees the utter disregard there is for their life.

The Armenian soldiers, too, have suffered the same fate. They were also all disarmed and put to constructing roads.(20) We have certain knowledge that the Armenian soldiers of the province of Erzeroum, who were at work on the road from Erzeroum to Erzindjan, have all been massacred. The Armenian soldiers of the province of Diyarbekir have all been massacred on the Diyarbekir-Ourfa road, and the Diyarbekir-Harpout road. From Harpout alone, 1,800 young Armenians were enrolled and sent off to work at Diyarbekir ; all were massacred in the neighbourhood of Arghana. We have no news from the other districts, but they have assuredly suffered the same fate there also.

In certain towns, the Armenians who had been consigned to oblivion in the prisons have been hanged in batches. During the past month alone, several dozen Armenians have been hanged in Kaisaria. In many places the Armenian inhabitants, to save their lives, have tried to become Mohammedans, but this time such overtures have not been readily accepted, as they were at the time of the other great massacres. At Sivas, the would-be converts to Islam were offered the following terms : they must hand over all children under twelve years of age to the Government, which would undertake to place them in orphanages; and they must consent, for their own part, to leave their homes and settle wherever the Government directed.

At Harpout, they would not accept the conversion of the men; in the case of the women, they made their conversion conditional in each instance upon the presence of a Moslem willing to take the convert in marriage. Many Armenian women preferred to throw themselves into the Euphrates with their infants, or committed suicide in their homes. The Euphrates and Tigris have become the sepulchre of thousands of Armenians.

All Armenians converted in the Black Sea towns---Trebizond, Samsoun, Kerasond, etc.---have been sent to the interior, and settled in towns inhabited exclusively by Moslems. The town of Shabin-Karahissar resisted the disarming and deportation, and was thereupon bombarded. The whole population of the town and the surrounding country, from the Bishop downwards, was pitilessly massacred,

In short, from Samsoun on the one hand to Seghert(21) and Diyarbekir on the other, there is now not a single Armenian left. The majority have been massacred, part have been carried off, and a very small part have been converted to Islam.

History has never recorded, never hinted at, such a hecatomb. We are driven to believe that under the reign of Sultan Abd-ul-Hamid we were exceedingly fortunate.

We have just learned the fate of some of the provincial bishops. Mgr. Anania Hazarabedian, Bishop of Baibourt, has been hanged without any confirmation of the sentence by the Central Government(22). Mgr. Bosak Der-Khoremian. Bishop of Harpout, started on his road to exile in May, and had barely left the outskirts of the town when he was cruelly murdered. But we have still, no news of the Bishops of Segliert, Bitlis, Moush, Keghi, Palou, Erzindjan, Kamakh, Tokat, Gurin, Samsoun and Trebizond, or for a month past of the Bishops of Sivas and Erzeroum. It is superfluous to speak of the martyred priests. When the people were deported, the churches were pillaged and turned into mosques, stables, or what not. Besides that, they have begun to sell at Constantinople the sacred objects and other properties of the Armenian churches, just as the Turks have begun to bring to Constantinople the children of the unhappy Armenian mothers.

It appears that the massacres have been less cruel in Cilicia, or at least we have no news yet of the worst. The population, which has been deported to the provinces of Aleppo and Der-el-Zor and to Damascus, will certainly perish of hunger. We have just heard that the Government has refused to leave in peace even the insignificant Armenian colonies at Aleppo and Ourfa, who might have assisted their unhappy brethren on their southward road; and the Katholikos of Cilicia, who still remains at Aleppo, is busy distributing the relief we are forwarding to him.

We thought at first that the Government's plan was to settle the Armenian question once and for all by clearing out the Armenians of the six Armenian provinces and removing the Armenian population of Cilicia, to forestall another danger in the future. Unhappily their plan was wider in scope and more thorough in intention. It consisted in the extermination of the whole Armenian population throughout the whole of Turkey. The result is that, in those seven provinces where the Government was pledged to introduce reforms, there is not one per cent. of the Armenian population left alive. So far, we do not know whether a single Armenian has reached Mosul or its neighbourhood. And this plan has now been put into execution even in the suburbs of Constantinople. The majority of the Armenians in the district of Ismid and in the province of Broussa have been forcibly deported to Mesopotamia, leaving behind them their homes and their property. In detail, the population of Adapazar, Ismid, Gegvé, Armasha and the neighbourhood has been removed---in fact, the population of all the villages in the Ismid district (except Baghtchedjik, which has been granted several days' grace). The Principal of the Seminary at Armasha has also been removed with his colleagues in orders and his seminarists.(23) They have had to leave everything behind, and been able to take nothing with them on their journey. Six weeping mothers confided their little ones to the Armenians of Konia, in order to save their lives, but the local authorities tore them away from their Armenian guardians, and handed them over to Moslems.

So now it is Constantinople's turn. In any case, the population has fallen into a panic, and is waiting from one moment to another for the execution of its doom. The arrests are innumerable, and those arrested are immediately removed from the capital. The majority will assuredly perish. It is the retail merchants of provincial birth, but resident in Constantinople, who are so far being deported---among them Marouké, Ipranossian Garabed, Kherbekian of Erzeroum, Atamian Karekin, Krikorian Sempad of Bitlis, etc. We are making great efforts to save at any rate the Armenians of Constantinople from this horrible extermination of the race, in order that, hereafter, we may have at least one rallying point for the Armenian cause in Turkey.

Is there anything further to add to this report ? The whole Armenian population of Turkey has been condemned to death, and this decree is being put into execution energetically in every corner of the Empire, under the eyes of the European Powers ; while, so far, neither Germany nor Austria has succeeded in checking the action of their ally and removing the stain of these barbarities, which also attaches to them. All our efforts have been without result. Our hope is set upon the Armenians abroad.

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7/wwi/1915/bryce/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Cheshire Regiment

15th (Service) Battalion (1st Birkenhead)
Formed at Birkenhead on 18 November 1914 by Alfred Bigland MP, as a Bantam Battalion. Moved to Hoylake.
June 1915 : attached to 105th Brigade in 35th Division at Masham and in August 1915 to Salisbury Plain. Adopted by the War Office on 15 August 1915.
Landed at Le Havre in January 1916.

http://www.1914-1918.net/cheshire.htm

NB. Kan iemand me vertellen wat "Adopted by the War Office" in dit verband betekent?
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HMS FURIOUS - Fleet Aircraft Carrier

HMS Furious was built by Armstrong Whitworth, laid down on 8 June 1915 and launched 15 August 1916. She was commissioned on 26 June 1917 as a sea plane carrier. Between 1917-1918 she was reconstructed with landing-on deck, and recommissioned 15 March 1918. In the early 1920s she was rebuilt with full length flush flight deck, modified between 1931-1932 to increase the AA battery, and an island added in 1939. Sold for scrapping January 1948 scrapping complete 1954.

Foto's op http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/ships/FURIOUS.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 20:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

PICTURES THAT HAVE NEVER BEEN PUBLISHED BEFORE
Taken by Cpl Ivor Williams 21st Battalion 1st AIF


View from second Supports. Ferme de Biez. Chappelle D'Armentierses. 15 August 1916

Foto... http://www.nashos.org.au/ww1%20photos%201.htm
Zie ook http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=3424
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

RED SOX

15 August 1916 - Another duel between Babe Ruth and Walter Johnson at Fenway Park ends in a 1-0 win for Boston in 13 innings. Ruth nearly ends the game in the 12th with a long drive, but Washington center fielder Clyde Milan makes the catch as he leans into the bleachers.

http://www.fenwayfanatics.com/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

RLM War Diary - Ypres 1917

Wednesday 15th. August, 1917. This was the night when I rode to Cassel with Smith when he lost his cap, his stirrups and control of his horse, and the Colonel, his temper. It's not worth while trying to play John Gilpin these days - though it is just as funny for the onlookers.

Two more F.G.C.Ms. and yet we are not a bad battalion, as battalions go.

http://lu.softxs.ch/mackay/Text/Diary5.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Fight for Hill 70, 15 August 1917

"Our gunners, machine-gunners and infantry never had such targets."

On 15 August 1917, the Canadian Corps launched an assault on Hill 70 near the industrial city of Lens situated in Northern France on the Western Front, during what was then known as the Great War. By the time the fighting settled down, some four days after, the Canadian Corps had suffered 5,843 casualties. Despite such losses, the capture of Hill 70 was a stellar victory for the Canadian Corps, and further marked it as an elite fighting force.

In a war where enormous slaughter was the norm, the fighting around Hill 70 had been overshadowed by other, larger, and far bloodier actions. This, despite the fact that General Currie, the Canadian Corps commander at Hill 70, and arguably the greatest soldier Canada has ever produced, regarded the struggle for Hill 70 as the hardest battle Canadians had fought in to date.

BATTLES COMPARED

Currie considered it harder than the battle for Second Ypres in April 1915, when the Germans first used poison gas on a wide scale, and where the Canadians suffered a 60 per cent casualty rate; harder than the fighting at the Somme in the autumn of 1916 where, after some three months in the trenches, the Canadian Corps lost over 29,000 casualties. It was also, according to Currie, tougher than the capture of Vimy Ridge in April 1917; this was no cakewalk, as over 10,000 casualties, including the loss of 3,598 killed, can attest. The fight for Hill 70 was overshadowed by the simultaneous British campaign around Passchendaele, a battle that has come to epitomize the horror of First World War trench warfare.

ULTERIOR MOTIVES

The operation for Hill 70 was intended to engage as many German formations as possible to prevent their reinforcing the Passchendaele sector. Originally, the 1st British Army had asked the Canadians to capture Lens and its surroundings and to prepare for a breakthrough to secure important tactical points beyond the city. However, General Currie, on personal investigation, counseled against this, believing a successful Canadian assault would leave the attacking troops in a far worse tactical position than the one they were leaving. The problem, as Currie saw it, was that Lens and its environs were dominated by two hills: Hill 70 to the north and Sallaumines Hill to the southeast. So long as both were strongly held by the Germans any Canadian gains would be costly and difficult to maintain. Such an advanced position would also force the artillery to move forward in support, and into more exposed positions. Moreover, trenches ran throughout the city and were defended by hundreds of German machine guns. Rather than assault Lens directly, Currie believed that Hill 70 and the surrounding terrain offered a more suitable objective. Its capture would place the Canadians in the dominant position and allow them to threaten the Germans in Lens, rather than the other way around. It would also provide the Allies with an excellent observation point into German back areas. "If we have to fight at all," Currie said, "let us fight for something worth having."

PERILOUS ASSAULT

Taking the hill and the surrounding area, however, would not be easy. The bald and treeless hill offered little cover for assaulting troops, while the city and its suburbs, reduced to rubble, provided excellent cover for massing German counterattacking forces. Moreover, slag from the Lens mining operations covered the area and made the footing treacherous. Assaulting over such ground would be perilous, especially for infantry loaded down with heavy equipment such as Vickers machine guns and ammunition. Further back, German reserve divisions threatened powerful counterattacks with the introduction of two new terrifying weapons: the Flammenwerfers, a flame-thrower capable of launching a stream of fire up to 50 feet, and mustard gas that caused severe and painful blistering. These, along with the normal machine gun, artillery, grenade, and barbed wire hazards, would make it tough going for the men of the 1st and 2nd Canadian Divisions to capture and hold Hill 70.

ASSAULT PLANNED

To overcome this defence, the Canadians meticulously prepared their assault plans. Intelligence on the German positions was gathered and studied over the preceding days and weeks. Replicas of the German defences were built behind the Canadian lines and the assault was rehearsed over these practice courses day and night in the days leading up to the attack. Tape, flags and name boards were erected showing the German names of trenches and positions, while all known trench mortar and machine gun emplacements, headquarters units and other important tactical points were marked on the ground. Various Canadian and British commands constructed miniature models of the area as well. The 2nd Canadian Brigade built its model on a scale of 1:40 while the 1st British Army, under whom the Canadians were then serving, prepared a plasticine model of the area on a 1:5,000 scale, and invited the Canadians to study it.

Nothing was left to chance as all troop movements and actions were carefully calculated in advance. As Currie noted in his diary: "Thorough preparation must lead to success. Neglect nothing." Since the Germans could see the preparations being made, and even knew the date of the impending blow, such training and rehearsal were crucial for success.

CURRIE WARNED

Upon hearing Currie's proposal, Field Marshal Haig, commander of all the British forces on the Western Front (including the Canadians), warned Currie that the Germans would put up a tremendous fight to hold the hill. However, as historian John Swettenham wrote in his 1965 publication, To Seize the Victory: The Canadian Corps in World War I, "Currie ... planned to turn this German sensitivity towards the loss of Hill 70 to his own advantage." In other words, once the hill was captured, Currie expected the Germans, as had become their custom, to launch strong counterattacks to take it back. It was Currie's intention to use artillery and massed machine gun fire to destroy those attackers. To do this, 160 heavy machine guns would be rushed forward once the hill was captured. Each gun would then act as a strong point around which other troops could anchor their defence. It was imperative that all gains made be quickly consolidated. Currie would also rely on the Royal Flying Corps and, once on the hill, the artillery observation officers were to call down artillery fire on the hapless German forces advancing below to retake the hill. Pilots and artillery observers, equipped with wireless for quickly relaying news of German movements and locations of active enemy artillery, played a vital role.

ARTILLERY SUCCESSFUL

The artillery also prepared a heavy preliminary bombardment to crush German resistance before the Canadians moved forward. Part of this bombardment included the firing of thousands of gas-filled drums and shells at the German positions in the days leading up to the attack. Meanwhile, a diversionary assault by the 4th Canadian Division on Lens itself on the day of attack was designed to draw German attention from the main blow. In the end, it proved an enormous success as it drew more retaliatory fire from German artillery than did the main assault. Five hundred flaming drums of oil were thrown into the city's suburbs on the day of battle to cause havoc and to spread a thick black smoke cloud over the area in order to blind German machinegunners.

CANADIAN SCOTTISH PIPERS FIRST OVER THE TOP

When the assault went in at 4:25A.M., on 15 August, it went like clockwork, just as rehearsed in the days prior to the attack. Pipers from the Canadian Scottish were amongst the first over the top, with their screeching bagpipes emboldening the nearby troops. They and other attacking units followed a wall of exploding shells that slowly crept across no-man's-land and on to and over the German lines. This creeping barrage, provided by more than 200 field guns, helped subdue those defenders who remained in position after the preliminary bombardment had pounded their positions into pulp. Meanwhile, heavier guns hammered pre-selected German positions further to the rear, while counter battery fire silenced those enemy batteries trying to stop the Canadian advance. By 6:00A.M., ten battalions of infantry, hugging the creeping barrage, had taken most of their objectives and were digging in. Consolidation of the final objectives was quickly carried out, with the troops readying themselves for the inevitable German counterattacks.

FIRST GERMAN COUNTERATTACK

The first one slammed into the new Canadian line before 9:00A.M. that morning, and marked the beginning of the most ferocious fighting for control of Hill 70. The Germans' skillful use of machine guns, artillery, flame-throwers and mustard gas, however, could not dislodge the Canadians from their hard-fought gains. Canadian machine gunners manning their heavy Vickers machine guns took a deadly toll. They were helped in their grisly task by artillery observers calling down shellfire on the approaching Germans. Overhead, pilots from the Royal Flying Corps reported massing enemy troops and active German artillery batteries to Canadian gun crews who then obliterated their positions. The artillery programme also called for concentrated fire at specific times and positions along probable German routes of approach. Knowing the location of German reserves, as well as their counterattacking habits, the Canadians prepared march tables for them, estimated their times of arrival at certain points, and shelled them unmercifully, thereby destroying them before they could do serious damage. For four days and three nights the carnage continued. Early on 18 August the Germans launched their 21st -- which proved to be their last -- counterattack to regain lost ground. It was hotly contested, but eventually defeated.

PLANNING AND STUDY PAY OFF

Thanks to thorough planning and study of German tactics, the Canadian assault was a complete success. Six Canadians won the Victory Cross for gallantry during this battle. The Germans suffered some 20,000 casualties, with the better part of five German divisions being shattered in their vain attempts to retake the hill. So devastating was Canadian fire that General Currie described the fighting as "nothing more or less than a slaughter." He noted in his diary that Canadian artillery, machine gun crews, and infantry never before had such targets. The larger objective of preventing German troops opposite their front from reaching and re-inforcing the Passchendaele sector had succeeded.

In the days that followed, the Canadians strengthened their lines and Hill 70 remained in Allied hands for the remainder of the war. As with the Battle of Vimy Ridge, the Canadians earned a reputation as elite troops, a reputation they built on and maintained for the rest of the war.

COPYRIGHT 2000 S.R. Taylor Publishing
COPYRIGHT 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning


http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_6972/is_9_7/ai_n28817540/pg_3/?tag=content;col1
Of http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-30148405.html . Doe maar wat...
Zie ook http://www.1914-1918.net/bat18.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Aug 2010 21:24, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Russian Revolution - A Gallery Of Photos

Foto 4: General L. G. Kornilov, waving to the Moscow crowd from the back of an open limousine during the State Convocation held under Provisional Government auspices from 12-15 August 1917.

http://www.nevsky88.com/SaintPetersburg/Revolution/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Seers Kidnapped (August 13-15, 1917)

As August 13, 1917 was approaching, word of the Fatima apparitions spread throughout the country. The liberal Masonic press took a special interest in the matter, sparing no opportunity to denounce it and spread falsehoods concerning the three shepherd children. When these tactics could not sway the masses of pilgrims, who faithfully traveled great distances in order to be present when Our Lady appeared, the press declared in classic anticlerical fashion that the clergy were deceiving the people in order to draw profits. The press strongly encouraged the local authorities to take action.

Fatima’s local authority, Artur de Oliveira Santos, who was the Administrator of the district of Vila Nova de Ourem, was an anticlerical fanatic. Also known as "The Tinsmith," he was a Freemason who enjoyed much power through his position, and ruled his district in a tyrannical fashion, imposing restrictions on churches and religious services on his slightest whim. The Tinsmith decided to end the popular piety resulting from the apparitions at Fatima, through whatever means necessary.

On August 10, the fathers of the three seers of Fatima, Manuel Marto and Antonio dos Santos, received an order to appear with their children the following day at Vila Nova de Ourem. It was a journey of nine miles, of which the only available means of transportation were either to walk or ride a donkey. Manuel Marto refused to have his two young children make the journey or appear before a court, and decided to go alone. Antonio dos Santos, however, was determined that his daughter, Lucy, answer for herself. The Tinsmith was furious at the absence of Francisco and Jacinta.

Recalling her experience with the Tinsmith, Lucy writes:

At the Administration office, I was interrogated by the Administrator, in the presence of my father, my uncle, and several other gentlemen who were strangers to me. The Administrator was determined to force me to reveal the Secret and to promise him never again to return to the Cova da Iria. To attain his end, he spared neither promises, nor even threats. Seeing that he was getting nowhere, he dismissed me, protesting however that he would achieve his end, even if this meant that he had to take my life. 1

On August 12, masses of people began arriving at the Cova da Iria, in anticipation of the apparition of the following day. On the morning of August 13, the Administrator arrived at the Marto home to see the children. He convinced the children’s fathers that he desired to "attend the miracle" with them, and together they first went to meet with the village priest. After being questioned, the Administrator had the children get into his carriage. The carriage at first made for the Cova da Iria, but suddenly turned and flew off in the other direction. The Administrator attempted to calm the children by saying that they were first going to meet with the priest at Ourem. To keep pilgrims on their way to the Cova from seeing the children, he wrapped them in a rug. Finally he arrived in triumph at his house, believing that by keeping the children from the Cova, nothing supernatural would happen and the business of the apparitions would be given up.

When they arrived at the Tinsmith’s house, the children were shut up in a room and told that they would not be let out until they had revealed the Secret. They were given lunch by the Tinsmith’s kind wife, who let them play with her children and saw that they lacked for nothing. The following day they were forced to undergo nine interrogations, but the children, strengthened by a special grace, remained steadfast.

The Tinsmith wanted to learn the Secret from them at any cost, but he could neither extract it nor trick the children into contradicting each other. He even called in a doctor to accuse the children of hallucinations and hysteria. The doctor’s conclusions have never been published. This fact speaks volumes, for had the doctor’s conclusion been that the children were hallucinating, the Administrator would have wasted no time in publishing the doctor’s testimony.

The Tinsmith then put the children into a prison cell full of other prisoners. They were then interrogated separately, after which the Tinsmith threatened to boil them in oil if they still refused to divulge the Secret of Fatima. In the presence of the children he ordered that a cauldron of oil be heated, and threatened to put the children in the cauldron if they did not cooperate. The children believed the Tinsmith’s threat. A man in the same prison cell tried to persuade Jacinta to give in, telling her that she could avoid being killed by simply telling the secret. Jacinta responded, "I’d rather die!"

The Tinsmith took Jacinta away first. Francisco and Lucy believed that she had gone to her death. The Tinsmith returned and told the children that Jacinta was dead. He again demanded that the secret be revealed, or Francisco and Lucy would also be boiled in oil. Francisco was next taken to his apparent death. The Tinsmith then threatened Lucy with the same fate if she did not cooperate. Lucy remained faithful, though she believed that her two cousins had been killed. However, none of the children were killed; the threat had been empty. Yet even after this final threat, the Tinsmith could not obtain the Secret. The next morning (August 15), after one last interrogation, having accomplished nothing he returned the children to Fatima.

Notes:
1. Frère Michel de la Sainte Trinité, The Whole Truth About Fatima, Volume I: Science and the Facts, (Immaculate Heart Publications, Buffalo, New York, 1989) p. 218.


Sorry dat ik het weer vermeld, maar dit blijft fascineren... http://www.fatima.org/essentials/opposed/seerkidn.asp
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Papal Peace Note - August 1917

(...) Sometime after 15 August all the belligerent governments received the full text of the Papal Note as did the press. Newspapers across Europe and America carried headlines about the Papal Note and contained the full text of the Note (see a summary of the Note below). There was much public discussion about the Pope's proposals. In the US and in Britain the patriotic press attacked the Papal Note with the slur that it was "Austrian-inspired" and that the Pope's neutrality and even-handedness were suspect. Therefore, the right-wing patriotic press reasoned that the Note must be shunned. The left-wing liberal and the socialist press in Britain, however, saw the Papal Note as a great opportunity for the Allies to reformulate their war aims and make a positive reply. This, the liberals and socialists reasoned, would put pressure on the Central Powers to respond positively to the Note or risk social unrest. (...)

http://www.hsc.csu.edu.au/modern_history/core_study/ww1/papal_peace/page153.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Michael James O'Rourke

Michael James O'Rourke VC, MM (March 19, 1878 – December 6, 1957), was born in Limerick and was by birth an Irish recipient, and by naturalisation a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross. The Victoria Cross is the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 39 years old, and a Private in the 7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

During the period 15/17 August 1917 at Hill 70 near Lens, France, Private O'Rourke, who was a stretcher-bearer, worked unceasingly for three days and nights bringing in the wounded, dressing their wounds and getting them food and water. During the whole of this period the area in which he worked was swept by heavy machine-gun and rifle fire and on several occasions he was knocked down and partially buried by enemy shells. His courage and devotion in carrying out his rescue work in spite of exhaustion and incessant heavy fire inspired all ranks and undoubtedly saved many lives.

After the war, O'Rourke eked out a meagre existence on skid road in Vancouver, British Columbia, surviving on a disability pension of 10 dollars per month and casual work on the docks. During a longshoremen's strike in 1935, he headed a protest march of about 1,000 strikers, wearing his medals and carrying the Union Flag. The marchers attempted to pass a police line guarding the waterfront and were attacked with clubs and tear gas in what came to be known as the Battle of Ballantyne Pier.

He died on 6 December 1957 in Vancouver and is buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_James_O'Rourke
Zie ook http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/llt/47/08dooley.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Belgian Air Force during WW1

The Air War Escalates 1916-1917
July 1917 saw intense air activity above the Flanders frontline with the Belgian Air corps flying an average of 120 sorties by day. Germans installed new airfields in small Flemish villages as Aartrijke, Varsenare, Wijnendale and Snellegem. Observation aircraft were extensively used to watch railway activities, troops movements and artillery moves behind the frontlines to detect premises of ground offensives.

In August 1917, Belgian pilots received their first Hanriot HD1. The small fighter was not in great favour with the French but will prove to be a good acquisition for the Belgian aces especially Willy Coppens who won most of his victories on this single machine gun biplane.

On 15 August 1917, the third battle of Ypres started. Although this sector was defended by Commonwealth troops, the Belgian Army and Air Corps were employed in the fights as the Belgian sector is close to the British sector.

The French ace Georges Guynemer also operated over the Flanders front and was finally shot down near Poelkapelle on 11 September. Another Ace, German this time, was killed on 30 July. Werner Voss credited of 48 victories was shot down near his base in Marke (Kortrijk).

Lees verder op http://www.wwiaviation.com/ww1_belgium1916-17.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

20th Engineer Battalion

The 20th Engineers traces its origins to 15 August 1917, when the war department issued General Order Number 108, forming the 20th Engineer Regiment. On 11 November 1917, the first contingent of the newly formed regiment departed to St. Nazaire, France, where the regiment grew and became the largest regiment in the history of the US Army, consisting of 29 battalions and over 46,000 Soldiers. The Regiment operated in support of the entire Allied Expeditionary Force across France with a primary mission of forestry (to produce lumber and timber) but its flexibility and command structure allowed for a wide range of other engineer missions.

The battalion earned the nickname “LUMBERJACKS” for its role in cutting timber and lumber. Additionally, our motto “Build and Fight!” was established as the regiment built camps and bases while fighting its way across Europe. Upon its return to the U.S. from Europe, the regiment deactivated July 1919 and was not reactivated until July 1940.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/20th-Engineer-Battalion/174786539939?v=info
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Vogue August 15, 1917

A girl in a ruffled green dress and a boy in printed trousers and a purple shirt hold oversize balloons against a black background. This illustration, by Helen Dryden, appeared on the August 15, 1917, cover of Vogue.

Ach gut, wat mooi... http://www.condenaststore.com/family/vogue-august-15-1917/invt/100077/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zonnebeke, Tyne Cot Cemetery

At the back of the cemetery is the long wall of the Tyne Cot Memorial. It carries the names of 34,863 British soldiers who have ‘no known grave’, men who died between 15 August 1917 and the end of the war. They represent the ‘overspill’ from the Menin Gate when it was realised in the 1920s that that memorial, built to commemorate all the British missing of the Ieper area, did not have enough space on its panels for the task. The vast majority of those on the wall at Tyne Cot would have died in the battles hereabouts of September to November 1917.

http://www.ww1westernfront.gov.au/tyne-cot/index.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Lusitania

15 august 1918 - 1st full length cartoon (Sinking of Lusitania)

http://www.brainyhistory.com/days/august_15.html

The Sinking of the Lusitania.mov

Winsor McCay's 1918 animated short created from eyewitness accounts and set to a new film score by Rachel Fogarty.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=todnyEe97ic
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS - 15 AUGUST 1918

Four men included in Thursday’s casualty list as ‘missing, believed drowned’ were victims of the German attack on the hospital ship Warilda. So far as is known they were the only New Zealanders involved in the disaster though others may have been in the hospital ship and come off unscathed.

The names of the men are:
TEMPERLEY, Pte A H, Palmerston North; KNOX, Pte J J, Wellington; McGRATH, Pte J J, Wellington; EVERETT, Pte J, Invercargill.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sooty/awn15aug1918.html

HMAT Warilda

(...) On 3 August 1918, she was transporting wounded soldiers from Le Havre, France to Southampton when she was torpedoed by UC-49, a German submarine.[8] This was despite being marked clearly with the Red Cross; as with a number of other hospital ships torpedoed during the war, Germany claimed the ships were also carrying arms.

The ship sank in about 2 hours, and of the 801 persons on board, a total of 123 lives were lost. Amongst the survivors was her commander, Capt. Sim who was later awarded the OBE by King George.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAT_Warilda
Foto van de Warilda op http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/pictoria/b/3/6/doc/b36884.shtml
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Cameron Highlanders of Canada Memorial Site

Damery

The next action was not a planned attack. On the afternoon of 15 August 1918, the 43rd was relieving the 52nd Battalion in the front lines near Damery. Just as C Company arrived, the 52nd was being attacked in force by 4 battalions. This company, in charge of Lt. Geddie, successfully counter-attacked. That night, a French unit on C Company's flank was attacked and were forced to withdraw some distance. This left one platoon of C Company surrounded. This platoon refused to surrender and put up such a fight that the Germans decided that they would kill them. When this platoon's ammunition had run out, and most of the men wounded, the enemy attacked and captured them. Instead of taking them prisoner, each Cameron was shot dead and they were all buried in a shell-hole. When the ground was re-taken, there was no sign of this platoon. They were all located a year after the war had ended by Imperial War Graves workers clearing the battlefield.
At noon on the 16th, the French attacked and the line was pushed forward. A second attack at 5:30 PM pushed the line just west of Fresnoy. These attacks left the companies weakened and the 43rd was relieved during the early morning hours of the 17th.

http://cameronhighlanderscanada.com/43pg4.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 21:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hundred Days Offensive

Somme
On 15 August 1918, Foch demanded that Haig continue the Amiens offensive, even though the attack was faltering as the troops outran their supplies and artillery, and German reserves were being moved to the sector. Haig refused, and instead he prepared to launch a fresh offensive by the British Third Army at Albert (the Battle of Albert), which opened on 21 August [13] .

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Hundred_Days_Offensive

On 15 August 1918, Field Marshal Douglas Haig refused demands from Marshal Ferdinand Foch to continue the Amiens offensive, even though the attack was faltering as the troops outran their supplies and artillery, and German reserves were being moved to the sector. Instead, Haig began to plan for an offensive at Albert, which opened on 21 August. The main attack was launched by the British Third Army, with the United States II Corps attached.

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Second_Battle_of_the_Somme_(1918)
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Relics Collection

The amount of spoil captured, both in quantity and variety, is simply beyond description, and the troops have stuffed their pockets with all sorts of interesting souvenirs.
- Letter, Lieutenant General Sir John Monash, 15 August 1918.

In December 1917, General William Birdwood, Australian Corps Commander, sent a circular to all AIF personnel which stated:

The Australian Government has decided to commemorate Australia's share in the present war by the formation, after the war, of Museums, in which will be collections of war trophies, photographs, sketches, trench papers, &c.

The Australian War Records Section (AWRS) was responsible for the collection of these items.

http://www.awm.gov.au/exhibitions/1918/about1918/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK

(...) Mustafa Kemal was stationed at Edirne and Diyarbakır after the Çanakkale wars and was promoted to the rank of lieutenant general on 1 April 1916. He fought against the Russian forces and recaptured Muş and Bitlis. Following short assignments at Damascus and Khallepo, he came to İstanbul in 1917. He traveled to Germany with Vahdettin Efendi, the heir to the throne. He became sick after this trip and went to Vienna and Karisbad for treatment. He returned to Khalleppo on 15 August 1918 as the Commander of the 7th army. At this front, he fought successful defence wars. He was appointed as the Commandar of Yıldırım Armies one day after the signing of the armistice at Mondros. (...)

http://www.ataturk.com/content/view/24/43/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Aug 2010 22:18, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Indian soldiers at entrance, 15 August 1919

Over 130,000 Indian soldiers served in World War I. After the Victory Parade on Peace Day, 19 July 1919, soon after the signing of the Versailles Treaty, the Indian Contingent visited the Natural History Museum.

http://piclib.nhm.ac.uk/piclib/www/image.php?img=83489
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

USS West Bridge (ID # 2888), Torpedoed, 15 August 1918

In the late afternoon of 15 August 1918 USS West Bridge was steaming in convoy toward France when she suffered a casualty in her steam turbine. The problem forced her to drop out of formation and call for a tow. A few minutes later the German submarine U-90 torpedoed S.S. Montanan, another member of the convoy, inflicting damage that ultimately proved fatal. Realizing the peril, West Bridge's commanding officer sent his crew to general quarters and evacuated most men from the machinery spaces.

Though USS Noma, one of the convoy escorts, was standing by, another enemy submarine (probably U-107, though an older source cites U-90) reached a firing position and launched a pair of torpedoes. One hit West Bridge amidships, opening her engine room to the sea. The second struck further forward, in number three hold. With two large holes in her starboard side, the ship seemed doomed. Her crew took to their boats. West Bridge, however, remained afloat, though with almost no bouyancy remaining. After the destroyer Burrows had rescued the stricken ship's crew and left the scene, a salvage party from USS Smith went aboard. Tugs arrived later and towed West Bridge some 400 miles to Brest, France. One of her officers and three crewmen lost their lives in this incident.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-w/id2888-k.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

UK Defence policy 1919-1932

Cabinet Conclusions. Naval, Military and Air Estimates. 15 August 1919

http://filestore.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pdfs/small/cab-23-15-wc-616a.pdf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

15 August 1919 → Written Answers (Commons)

BLACKBERRIES.


HC Deb 15 August 1919 vol 119 c1796W 1796W

Mr. E. CECIL asked the Food Controller whether, in view of the continued shortage of food, any systematic collection of blackberries by school-children or otherwise is contemplated, such as was carried out under the Food Production Department last year?

Mr. ROBERTS It is anticipated that there will be a satisfactory crop of autumn fruits, and I do not propose to organise a scheme for the collection of blackberries this year.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1919/aug/15/blackberries
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

CHRISTCHURCH-WELLINGTON FIRST COOK STRAIT FLIGHT

1920, 15 August - Canterbury (NZ) Aviation Co Ltd. Avro 504K, D6243, flown by Captain Euan Dickson left Christchurch at 7am. and after short stops at Kaikoura and Blenheim, landed at the Trentham Racecourse near Wellington at 2.10pm. The Post Office reported 'fairly large mails' but numbers were not recorded.

http://www.airmailsnz.com/page3.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Slag om Luik

(...) Fort Loncin wordt op 15 augustus 1914 geraakt door een voltreffer in de kruitkamer. De Belgische generaal Gérard Leman wordt door de Duitsers levend vanonder het puin gehaald en bij generaal von Emmich gebracht. Leman eist dat er in het rapport melding wordt gemaakt van het feit dat hij zich niet heeft overgegeven en dat hij bewusteloos was bij de gevangenneming. (...)

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slag_om_Luik
Zie ook http://www.nieuwsdossier.nl/dossier/1914-08-15/Fort+Loncin+gebombardeerd
Zie ook http://www.greatwarcollection.nl/Loncin/index.html
Zie ook http://www.hln.be/hln/nl/961/Wetenschap/article/detail/372196/2008/08/07/25-soldaten-uit-WOI-krijgen-laatste-rustplaats-in-Fort-Loncin.dhtml
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Aug 2010 23:07, in toaal 2 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Panamakanaal gereed

15 augustus 1914 - Op 15 augustus 1914 is de aanleg van het Panamakanaal voltooid. Dit kanaal verbindt de Atlantische en de Stille Oceaan met elkaar waardoor schepen niet meer om Zuid Amerika hoeven te varen.
In 1903 heeft Amerika de rechten verkregen om in Panama een kanaal te graven. In 1912 besluit de Amerikaanse President William Taft dat Amerikaanse schepen voordeel krijgen bij het doorvaren van het kanaal. Op 10 oktober 1913 was de verbinding klaar maar was het kanaal nog niet gereed voor gebruik.

In 1977 ondertekenden Panama en Amerika een verdrag waarin stond dat Panama vanaf het jaar 2000 het kanaal weer in eigen handen zou krijgen.

Totdat het Panamakanaal geopend werd moesten schepen langs het zuidelijkste punt van Zuid Amerika, Kaap Hoorn. Na de opening scheelde dit vanaf New York ongeveer 4 weken varen.

Het Panamakanaal is 81,6 kilometer lang, is minimaal 12,4 meter diep en bevat 3 sluizen.

http://www.nieuwsdossier.nl/dossier/1914-08-15/Panamakanaal+gereed
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Aug 2010 23:07, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 22:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1914)

15 augustus 1914 - De burgemeester vroeg aan de arrondissementscommissaris in Turnhout stukken voor de miliciens die vrijstelling of ontslaging vroegen op grond van de vermogenstoestand van de familie. Het betrof Alphons Jan Jozef Segers, Petrus Jules Jansen, Gerard Adriaan Moreau en Jozef Lodewijk Slockers. (Gemeentearchief Baarle-Hertog; 2.073.564 Register van Briefwisseling)

http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=187:05-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1914&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 23:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

IJZERTOREN

Het ontstaan van de IJzerbedevaarten ligt tijdens de eerste WO.

De Vlaamse soldaten aan het front waren ontevreden door het feit dat ze steeds vernederd werden door hun oversten die geen Vlaams wilden of konden spreken waardoor alle bevelen in het Frans gebeurde en vele soldaten verstonden het niet.

Vooraanstaande Vlamingen zoals Prof. Frans Daels, Filip de Pillecijn e.a. steunden onze jongens in hun verzet daartegen.
Er ontstond een geheime beweging de “frontbeweging”, deze beweging ijverde voor gelijke rechten en een Vlaamse taal aan het front.

Op 15 Augustus 1916 wordt een Heldenhulde comité opgericht ,dit comité wilde hulde brengen aan de gesneuvelde Vlaamse soldaten met o.a een zerkje te plaatsen voor de gesneuvelde Vlaamse jongens, dit in de vorm van een kruis ontworpen door Joe English.

De gekende “Heldenhuldezerkjes” met in de kruiskop de letters AVV-VVK.

Om deze Vlaamse gesneuvelden te gedenken worden , door toedoen van o.a Frans Daels,vanaf 1920 jaarlijks bedevaarten naar de graven aan de IJzer georganiseerd.

Eerste bedevaart gaat door op 4-5-6 September aan het graf van Joe English te Steenkerke (Veurne).

http://blog.seniorennet.be/wptr1302/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 23:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Stijn Streuvels, In oorlogstijd. Het volledige dagboek van de Eerste Wereldoorlog

15 augustus 1917 - Anders de drukste dag van het ganse jaar is nu de stilste en over heel de streek valt niets te bespeuren. Kortrijk heeft het in de laatste dagen fel te lijden gehad van de bommen. Over heel de stad werden zij ‘gezaaid’ en er zijn verscheidene huizen ingeslagen en veel burgers gedood. De schrik heerst onder de bevolking, zover dat men tevreden is als het regent om dan tenminste enige gerustheid te hebben. Men slaapt over 't algemeen in de kelder. Als men erin is, schijnt het gevaar niet zo dreigend. In de avond echter ben ik in de gelegenheid een aanval van dichtbij gade te slaan. Van uit ons venster zien wij een aanval boven Lendelede. De lucht zit vol zoeklichten die alle richtingen doorkruisen. De vliegers ronken als een zwerm reuzenbijen. Er wordt uit alle plaatsen geschoten en samen met de vallende bommen, maakt het een infernaal gerucht. Dat doet denken aan het vergaan van de wereld. Daarop gaan we te bed alsof er verder niets meer te vrezen ware...

Tegen den ochtend echter word ik gewekt door hetzelfde verschrikkelijk geraas waarbovenuit de noodklok klept. Voor 't eerst kan ik ondervinden wat doodsgevaar eigenlijk bijbrengt van physieke4 gevoelens. Alle stonde kon het dak boven mijn hoofd openscheuren en een bom neerkomen, - men weet het dreigend gevaar boven de stad, - waar en op wie zal het treffen? Dat gevoel bracht bij mij een soort verlamming teweeg en terwijl ik vrouw en kinderen van mijn gastheer hoorde naar de kelder vluchten, bleef ik roerloos liggen met 't gedacht: als ik het vangen moet, wel hier zo goed dan elders! Het waren in elk geval geen aangename stonden en het brengt een deugddoende ontlasting als het hels gerucht ophoudt en het gevaar geweken is.

http://www.dbnl.org/tekst/stre009inoo02_01/stre009inoo02_01_0036.php
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Aug 2010 23:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Utrechts Nieuwsblad (15-08-1918)

http://www.hetutrechtsarchief.nl/collectie/kranten/un/1918/0815
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Ga naar Pagina 1, 2  Volgende
Pagina 1 van 2

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group