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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2006 23:14    Onderwerp: 27 mei Reageer met quote

Erfolgreicher Vorstoß beim Thiaumontwalde

Großes Hauptquartier, 27. Mai. 1916
Westlicher Kriegsschauplatz:
Nördlich des Kanals von La Bassée drang eine unserer Patrouillen bei Festubert in die feindliche Stellung , machte Gefangene und kehrte ohne Verluste zurück.
In den Argonnen lebhafter Minenkampf, durch den die feindlichen Gräben in größerer Breite zerstört wurden. Außer einigen Gefangenen erlitten die Franzosen zahlreiche Verluste an Toten und Verwundeten.
Links der Maas richteten die Franzosen seit Mitternacht heftige Angriffe gegen Cumières; es gelang ihnen, vorübergehend in den Südrand des Dorfes einzudringen, wir machten bei der Säuberung 53 Gefangene.
Rechts der Maas gelang es uns, bis zu den Höhen am Südwestrand des Thiaumontwaldes vorzustoßen. Ein französischer Angriffsversuch dagegen wurde durch Artilleriefeuer im Keime erstickt. Zwei feindliche Angriffe gegen unsere neu eroberten Stellungen südlich der Feste Douaumont scheiterten restlos.
In den Kämpfen südwestlich und südlich der Feste sind seit dem 22. Mai an Gefangenen 48 Offiziere, 1943 Mann eingebracht.
Östlicher Kriegsschauplatz:
Bei einer erfolgreichen Patrouillenunternehmung südlich Kekkau machten wir einige Gefangene.
Balkankriegsschauplatz:
Keine Veränderung.

Oberste Heeresleitung. 1)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2006 23:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

May 27

1918 Third Battle of the Aisne begins

In the early morning hours of May 27, 1918, the German army begins the Third Battle of the Aisne with an attack on Allied positions at the Chemin des Dames ridge, in the Aisne River region of France.

By mid-May 1918, General Erich von Ludendorff, mastermind of the ambitious German offensive—known as the Kaiserschlacht, or the “kaiser’s battle”—launched that spring, was determined to reclaim Chemin des Dames from the French with a forceful, concentrated surprise attack on the strategically crucial ridge. There had been two previous battles in the Aisne region, in 1914 and 1917, but both had been offensives by the Allies—predominately the French—against the Germans; the second was part of the failed Nivelle Offensive, named for Robert Nivelle, the French commander in chief who was summarily replaced in the wake of the offensive’s disastrous outcome. Nivelle’s successor, Phillipe Petain, was aware of the likelihood of a German attack at the Chemin des Dames in 1918, but he failed to anticipate its strength and scale.

In the early morning hours of May 27, 4,000 German guns opened fire on a 24-mile-long stretch of the Allied lines, beginning the Third Battle of the Aisne. The Germans advanced 12 miles deep through the French sector of the lines near Chemin des Dames, demolishing four entire French divisions. Four more French and four British divisions fell between the towns of Soissons and Reims, as the Germans reached the Aisne in less than six hours. By the end of the day, Ludendorff’s men had driven a wedge 40 miles wide and 15 miles deep through the Allied lines.

Earlier that month, the political and military chiefs of France and Britain had invested supreme control over their joint military strategy on the Western Front to Ferdinand Foch, chief of the French general staff. Foch’s control over the other commanders in chief proved relatively limited in this instance, however, as he was unable to force Britain’s Douglas Haig to transfer more than five British divisions to relieve French troops. The Germans were not as successful elsewhere on the Western Front, however, as an Allied force including some 4,000 Americans scored a major victory at Cantigny, on the Somme River, on May 28. Even as the German spring offensive continued in force, the Allied defense was stiffening, and as the summer of 1918 began, Petain, Foch and the rest of the Allied commanders began to shift their focus to counterattacks, knowing the outcome of World War I hung in the balance.
www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 22:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

100 Events in the Gallipoli Campaign

27 May 1915 - U21 torpedoed and sank the battleship HMS Majestic as the ship guarded the ship to shore transports off ‘W’ Beach, Helles. Forty-nine sailors went down with the ship.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/100-events-gallipoli-campaign/may-1915.html

File:HMS Majestic sinking 27 May 1915

The last moments of British battleship HMS Majestic, torpedoed by the U-21 off Cape Helles, Dardanelles, on 27 May 1915.

Photo from The War Illustrated, 26 June 1915. Caption reads: The last moments of H.M.S. Majestic, showing the huge battleship three minutes after she had been torpedoed by a German submarine, about to turn completely over and sink. The Majestic was torpedoed off the Gallipoli Peninsula early in the morning of May 27th. In this impressive photograph the doomed vessel is seen, after receiving her death-blow, with her torpedo-nets out, and her crew scrambling down her hull. Small craft are rushing to the rescue, and near her are larger vessels, powerless to help. On the British ship from which this photograph was taken, men are watching the tragic spectacle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HMS_Majestic_sinking_27_May_1915.jpg

Major Warships Sunk in World War 1 - 1915

27 May 1915 - Majestic, British, Majestic class Pre-Dreadnought Battleship
Like Triumph she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U21 near Cape Helles in the Eastern Mediterranean. Her torpedo nets were deployed and she was surrounded by destroyers. She was hit by two torpedoes and she listed rapidly and sunk with the loss of 40 crew.

http://www.worldwar1.co.uk/sunk15.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 22:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australia and the Gallipoli Campaign

27 May 1915 - Night attack by the British destroyer HMS Rattlesnake and men of the 9th Battalion (Queensland) under Lieutenant M Wilder-Neligen on a Turkish trench near the beach at Gaba Tepe. The purpose of this, and subsequent attacks, was to make the enemy think that a major offensive would be launched from the southern positions of Anzac.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/australia-gallipoli-campaign/may-1915.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 22:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Alpenkorps (German Empire)

The Alpenkorps was a provisional mountain unit of division size formed by the Imperial German Army during World War I. It was considered by the Allies to be one of the best units of the German Army.Histories of Two Hundred and Fifty-One Divisions of the German Army which Participated in the War (1914-1918), compiled from records of Intelligence section of the General Staff, American Expeditionary Forces, at General Headquarters, Chaumont, France 1919, (1920)

Order of battle on May 27, 1915
Kgl. Bayerische Jäger-Brigade 1:
Kgl. Bayerisches 1. Jäger-Regiment
Kgl. Bayerisches Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 1 König
Kgl. Bayerisches Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 2
Kgl. Bayerisches Reserve-Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 2
Kgl. Bayerisches Infanterie-Leib-Regiment
Kgl. Bayerische Jäger-Brigade 2:
Jäger-Regiment Nr. 2
Kgl. Bayerisches Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 10
Kgl. Bayerisches Reserve-Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 10
Kgl. Bayerisches Reserve-Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 14
Jäger-Regiment Nr. 3
I./Jäger-Regiment Nr. 3 (Kgl. Bayerisches Schneeschuhbataillon I)
II./Jäger-Regiment Nr. 3 (Schneeschuhbataillon II)
III./Jäger-Regiment Nr. 3 (Schneeschuhbataillon III)
IV./Jäger-Regiment Nr. 3 (Kgl. Bayerisches Schneeschuhbataillon IV)
Gebirgs-MG-Abteilungen Nr. 201-210 (206-209 were Bavarian)
Reserve-MG-Abteilung Nr. 4
3.Eskadron/Kgl. Bayerisches 4. Chevauleger-Regiment König
Gebirgs-Artillerie-Abteilung Nr. 1
Kgl. Bayerische Gebirgs-Artillerie-Abteilung Nr. 2
Feldartillerie-Abteilung Nr. 203
Feldartillerie-Abteilung Nr. 204
Fußartillerie-Batterie Nr. 101
Fußartillerie-Batterie Nr. 102
Pionier-Kompanie Nr. 101
Kgl. Bayerische Pionier-Kompanie Nr. 102
Kgl. Bayerische Gebirgs-Minenwerfer-Abteilung Nr. 269
Gebirgs-Minenwerfer-Abteilung Nr. 270

http://www.spiritus-temporis.com/alpenkorps-german-empire-/order-of-battle-on-may-27-1915.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Joseph Gallieni, 1849-1916

Joseph Gallieni was a French general most famous for the incident of the taxis of the Marne, which saw him move troops from the garrison of Paris to the front line in a fleet of Paris taxis. Most of his early military experience came in France’s colonial empire. After attending St. Cyr (from 1868), he fought in the Franco-Prussian War, where he was taken prisoner.

His colonial career began in 1876 in Senegal. After that he led an expedition to the upper Niger. In 1886 he was appointed governor of the French Sudan. In 1888 he was appointed to the War College, before returning to the empire in 1893 at commander of a military district in Tonkin. In 1896 he was promoted to General and made governor of Madagascar, then a new French possession. While in Madagascar he supported a number of men who were later prominent during the First World War, amongst them Joseph Joffre.

In 1905 he returned to France as commander of XIV corps at Lyons. In 1911 he was offered the post of chief of the General Staff, but declined it on the grounds of age and upcoming retirement. In May 1914 he retired.

This was a short retirement. In August 1914 he became deputy chief of the General Staff, under Joffre. The two men rapidly fell out. Gallieni was allamred by the German attacks on the fortress at Liège, part of the German advance through Belgium. Joffre was still convinced that no major German forces could be advancing through Belgium, and banned Gallieni from general Headquarters.

On 26 August Gallieni was appointed military governor of Paris. Initially this was a rear-area appointment, for the main fighting was still happening on the frontiers and in Belgium, but the retreat to the Marne was already underway. As Gallieni worked on improving the fortifications of Paris, the Germans were advancing, at first towards the west of the city, but then, as von Kluck’s army turned south and then south east, to the east. This gave the French a great chance to hit the right flank of the German advance.

An anomaly in the French command structure meant that until 2 September Gallieni’s command had been independent of Joffre’s. Joffre had command over all armies in the field, but the garrison of Paris was not a field army. Worse, on 1 September the Sixth Army (Maunoury) came into the area under Gallieni’s command. On 2 September Joffre convinced the government to give him control over Gallieni’s troops.

Both Joffre and Gallieni soon came to the conclusion that the French Sixth Army, by then in the vicinity of Paris, with the help of the Paris garrison, should strike east towards the Germans as they passed east of Paris. They differed on how quickly the attack should be made. Joffre would have preferred to allow the Germans to move further south, but was convinced to attack them on the Marne. Gallieni’s concerns were still for the safety of Paris while Joffre had to take into account the entire front line, and the coordination of any attack from Paris with the movements of the armies rushing west from the eastern front.

On 5 September the Sixth Army struck east from Paris (battle of the Ourcq River, 5-9 September 1914). Von Kluck’s First Army turned west, and there was soon a real danger that the French army on the Ourcq would be crushed, exposing Paris to a direct assault. Gallieni played a crucial part in the battle, moving a number of divisions out of Paris to aid the Sixth Army.

This was the moment that earned Gallieni his enduring fame. Every available form of transport was needed to move the masses of men from Paris to the Ourcq. One large continent of troops were ferried east in a convoy of Paris taxis commandeered by Gallieni – the famous taxis of the Marne. The line of the Ourcq held, and by turning west von Kluck had opened a dangerous gap in the German line, into which the French and British were able to advance. On 9 September the German retreat from the Marne began.

Gallieni’s part in the battle of the Marne is controversial. To his partisans he was the man who saved France, forcing Joffre to abandon his plans to retreat to the Seine before counterattacking and breaking up the German advance. To his opponents he was the man who saved the German armies from Joffre’s masterly plan by attacking too soon. If he had waited until the Germans had advanced south of the Marne, and then attacked east from Paris the German armies might have been trapped. Gallieni himself claimed that the same result would have been produced if he had been allowed to send the Sixth Army further north to outflank the Germans.

In the aftermath of the Marne, Gallieni was left behind as the fighting moved away from Paris. He remained governor of Paris for the next year, but was not satisfied in this increasingly irrelevant job. His popularity worried the government, while his opposition to a focus on the western front annoyed Joffre, who refused to offer Gallieni a field command.

In October 1915 Aristide Briand, a friend of Gallieni’s, became premier and appointed Gallieni as Minister of War. Gallieni was initially reluctant, but eventually came to see this post as his route to the supreme command. With that in mind he replaced some of Joffre’s supporters, and moved General de Castelnau to general headquarters as Joffre’s deputy in the hope that he would restrain his superior. Instead Castelnau would become closely associated with Joffre.

Gallieni’s favoured Balkan strategy unravelled with the collapse of Serbia in 1915. In October an allied expeditionary force reached Salonika in Greece, but having failed to support Serbia should probably have been withdrawn. Briand and Gallieni combined to ensure that 150,000 men were kept at Salonika, where they soon began to suffer from malaria. The Salonika front achieved little or nothing until 1918, but at a heavy cost.

Towards the end of 1915 Gallieni made his move for power. He wanted to sideline Joffre, give de Castelnau authority in the field and take over himself as commander in chief. The move was badly timed. Joffre was still immensely popular, and Gallieni did not have the support of Briand. It would take another year of failure on the western front to wear down Joffre’s authority.

Joffre’s prestige was so high at the start of 1916 that it could even survive the disaster at Verdun. Later in 1915 concerned officers had reported the poor state of the defences of Verdun to the government. Joffre’s response was anger over their violation of the chain of command, but his own unwillingness to listen to concerns about Verdun had forced his subordinate’s hands. The German attack began on 21 February (battle of Verdun). The Germans overran a number of the outer fortifications with some ease, and Verdun soon came under serious pressure. Gallieni launched an attack on Joffre’s handling of the situation, calling for his removal.

This was too much for Briand, who was aware that his own position was not secure enough for him to attack Joffre. Instead it was Gallieni who offered his resignation. He remained in office until mid-March, when ill health would have forced him out of office anyway. After undergoing two unsuccessful operations, Gallieni died on 27 May 1916.

Rickard, J (18 September 2007), Joseph Gallieni, 1849-1916 , http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/people_gallieni.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Canon law (Catholic Church)

Canon Law, the Canon law of the Holy Roman Church, is a fully developed legal system, with all the necessary elements: courts, lawyers, judges, a fully articulated legal code and principles of legal interpretation. The academic degrees in canon law are the J.C.B. (Juris Canonici Baccalaureatus, Bachelor of Canon Law, normally taken as a graduate degree), J.C.L. (Juris Canonici Licentiatus, Licentiate of Canon Law) and the J.C.D. (Juris Canonici Doctor, Doctor of Canon Law). Because of its specialized nature, advanced degrees in civil law or theology are normal prerequisites for the study of canon law. (...)

Codification - In response to the request of the bishops at the First Vatican Council, Pope Pius X ordered that work begin on reducing these diverse documents into a single code, presenting the normative portion in the form of systematic short canons shorn of the preliminary considerations ("Whereas ..." etc.) and omitting those parts that had been superseded by later developments.

The code was promulgated on 27 May 1917 as the Code of Canon Law (Latin: Codex Iuris Canonici) by his successor, Pope Benedict XV, who set 19 May 1918 as the date on which it came into force. For the most part, it applied only to the Latin Church except when "it treats of things that, by their nature, apply to the Oriental", such as the effects of baptism (canon 87).

Lees verder op http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_law_(Catholic_Church)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Third Battle of the Aisne, 1918

Whilst the first two battles of the Aisne were conducted by Allied forces, predominantly French, against the German army in France, the Third Battle of Aisne, from 27 May-6 June 1918, comprised the final large-scale German attempt to win the war before the arrival of the U.S. Army in France, and followed the Lys Offensive in Flanders.

The focus of the offensive was the Chemin des Dames Ridge, held by the Germans upon their retreat from the Marne in September 1914 until their ejection, at huge cost to the French, during the Nivelle Offensive, also known as the Second Battle of the Aisne, in April 1917.

Erich Ludendorff, although subservient to Paul von Hindenburg within the German Third Supreme Command, effectively dictated the planning and execution of the German war effort. He determined to reclaim the Chemin des Dames Ridge from the French with the launch of a massed concentrated surprise attack. In so doing he anticipated that the French would divert forces from Flanders to the Aisne, leaving him to renew his offensive further north, where he believed the war could be won.

At the time of the offensive the front line of the Chemin des Dames was held by four divisions of the British IX Corps, ironically sent from Flanders in early May in order to recuperate. General Duchene, commander of the French Sixth Army, was responsible for the continued defence of the sector, and Lieutenant-General Sir Alexander Hamilton Gordon, commander of IX Corps, was required to place himself under Duchene's direction.

Thus, when Duchene decided to send the British divisions to the front line, Hamilton Gordon, although reluctant to see his fatigued troops further exposed, was obliged to dispatch his men forward. He however recommended to Duchene that a policy of defence in depth be adopted for the eventuality of an attack. Duchene disagreed, preferring to mass troops in front-line trenches.

The attack was launched early on 27 May with a ferocious heavy artillery bombardment of 4,000 guns across a 40 km front, against four divisions of IX Corps. Owing to the heavy concentration of primarily British troops in front-line trenches, casualties from the bombardment were severe; IX Corps itself was virtually wiped out. The bombardment was accompanied by a gas attack, designed to disable defensive gun crews, after which 17 divisions of German infantry, under Crown Prince Wilhelm, began their advance through a 40 km gap in the Allied line.

With the Allied forces entirely taken by surprise, the rapid progress of the German troops was reminiscent of the more fluid war of movement of the opening months of the war.

Between Soissons and Reims the Germans broke through a further eight Allied divisions, four British, four French, reaching the Aisne in under six hours. By the end of the first day the Germans had gained 15 km of territory and had reached the River Vesle. By 30 May the Germans had managed to capture 50,000 Allied soldiers and 800 guns, arriving within 90 km of Paris by 3 June.

Once again a German victory seemed probable. However, as before, problems with supplies and reserves, and troop fatigue, in addition to prolonged Allied counter-attacks, halted the German advance at the Marne. By 6 June the German advance had run out of steam.

French casualties were heavy, with 98,000 losses; their British allies suffered 29,000 casualties. General Duchene was dismissed by Petain, amid an atmosphere of crisis in Paris. Petain's own position was placed under threat, with his role being made subservient to that of the recently promoted Allied Supreme Commander, Ferdinand Foch.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/aisne3.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Operation Blücher: The 2nd Battle of the Marne, 27 May 1918

At 0100 hours 4000 German guns and mortars fired off one of their whirlwind, battle opening barrages along a 30 kilometre front.

The Germans had stopped using long winded week of bombardments, preferring to go for the same number of shells in a far shorter time span. The effect was even more terrifying as high explosive and gas shells rained down along the line, behind it, deep in the rear areas and above all on the allied guns.

All of the British and French gun emplacements had been identified and were knocked out with hours; hardly a round was fired in defence.

The Devon's position was as the Divisional reserve and they were able to make use of the creutes at the Bois de Buttes where they were located. These tunnelled quarries provided them with some shelter against the tempest of flying metal which was shattering the allied front line.

The Germans considered the Plateau de Californie to be the keystone of the ridge and attacked the British 50th Division with three divisions plus a fourth in reserve. The French 22nd on the left were faced by five divisions.

The breakthrough was achieved and the Germans had breakfast in the Allied front line.

Lees verder op http://www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_chemin_24.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Navy-Curtiss NC-4 Flying Boat - USA

Another chain of destroyers extended between the Azores and Lisbon. As NC-4 over flew them, each ship radioed her passage to the base ship Melville at Ponta Delgada and the cruiser Rochester in Lisbon, who in turn reported to the Navy Department in Washington. Finally word came from the destroyer McDougal, last ship in the picket line, that completion of the flight was only minutes away.

In NC-4 all eyes peered eastward where the horizon was fading into the deep purple of twilight. Then at 19:39 hours, from the center of that darkening line, there flashed a diamond spark of light—Cabo da Roca lighthouse—and the westernmost point in Europe had been sighted. Minutes later NC-4 roared over the rocky coastline and turned southward toward the Tagus estuary and Lisbon.

According to Read, a man of few words, this moment was "perhaps the biggest thrill of the whole trip." Each man on board realized that "No matter what happened—even if we crashed on landing—the transatlantic flight, the first one in the history of the world, was an accomplished fact."

At 20:01 hours on May 27,1919, NC-4's keel sliced into the waters of the Tagus. The first transatlantic flight was indeed an accomplished fact.

http://www.aviation-history.com/navy/nc4.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

27 May 1919, Commons Sitting: BRITISH TROOPS (FINLAND).

Lieut.-Commander KENWORTHY asked the Secretary of State for War whether British troops have been landed on the shores of the Gulf of Finland; whether these men are all volunteers; and how many of them had volunteered to relieve British troops believed to be in danger in North Russia?

Mr. FORSTER I am informed that no British troops have been landed.

Tsja... http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/may/27/british-troops-finland
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 23:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

May 27, 1919 in History

Event: Charles Strite patents pop-up toaster

http://www.brainyhistory.com/events/1919/may_27_1919_80007.html

Charles Strite

Charles P. Strite was an American inventor.

Strite was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received U.S. patent #1,394,450 on October 18, 1921 for the pop-up bread toaster.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Strite

Patent for Bread-Toaster Issued October 18, 1921

Patent for Bread-Toaster Issued October 18, 1921. The automatic (pop-up) toaster becomes a standard in American households

PRESS RELEASE

Charles P. Strite, born in Minneapolis, MN, received patent #1,394,450 on October 18, 1921 for the bread-toaster. During World War I, Strite worked in a manufacturing plant in Stillwater, MN, where he became frustrated with the burned toast served in the cafeteria. Strite, determined to find a way of toasting bread that did not depend on human attention, invented the pop-up toaster with a variable timer. In 1925, using a redesigned version of Strite's toaster, the Toastmaster Company began to market the first household toaster that could brown bread on both sides simultaneously, set the heating element on a timer, and eject the toast when finished. By 1926, Charles Strite's Toastmaster was available to the public and was a huge success.
This patent, as well as more than six million patents issued since the first in 1790, can be seen on the Department of Commerce's U.S. Patent and Trademark Office web site at www.uspto.gov .

http://www.uspto.gov/news/pr/2001/01-46.jsp
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2010 10:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

26 juni 1915 in het Bois Sabot

Het 202e Regiment Infanterie bezet een deel van het front bij het Bois Sabot. Ze doen dit sinds 27 mei, wanneer de sectoren van de 60e Divisie (119e en 120e Brigade) opnieuw ingedeeld worden als gevolg van een verlenging van de divisiesector. De regimenten van de 120e Brigade zijn als volgt gerangschikt: het 225e bij Moulin de Souain, het 336e bij Souain, en het 202e in de sector Bois Sabot, op 3 kilometer ten oosten van Souain, van het punt waar de voorste loopgraaf de weg van Souain naar Perthes snijdt, tot aan de zuidoosthoek van het Bois Sabot. De 119e Brigade sluit rechts daarvan aan, vanaf de oostrand van het Bois Sabot tot aan een hoekige uitstulping van de frontlijn die "Enclave 13" genoemd wordt.

De bataljons en compagnieën van het 202e wisselen elkaar elke drie dagen af. Het behoort bijna tot de dagelijkse routine dat er enkele verliezen te betreuren zijn, meestal als gevolg van artilleriebeschietingen:

28 mei, 4 gewonden
29 mei, 5 doden, 21 gewonden
30 mei, 1 dode, 2 gewonden

http://www.grensland1418.nl/BoisSabot.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2010 10:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Gasoorlog

De geallieerde stellingen werden over een afstand van 4 km doorbroken. De Duitse infanterie trok achter de gaswolk aan en veroverde 9 batterijen. De geallieerden waren in grote verwarring, ondanks de reservetroepen die werden ingezet. Diezelfde nacht was bevelhebber Foch de situatie echter weer meester door troepen in te zetten die bestemd waren voor een offensief in Artois. Er werden snel drie divisies naar de bedreigde frontlinie verplaatst, en om 12 uur 's nachts was de linie weer hersteld. Er werden nog wel wat tegenaanvallen gedaan, maar het resultaat was nihil. Na verscheidene gasaanvallen waardoor de Duitsers een strook grond konden veroveren van 12 km lengte en 3 km breedte keerde op 27 mei 1915 de rust weer. De Duitsers hebben ca. 24 x een gasaanval uitgevoerd tijdens de 2de Ieperslag.

Een dag na de eerste gasaanval was de directeur van de Franse gezondheidsdienst aan het front aanwezig om vast te stellen welk gas er was gebruikt. Direct erna begonnen de geallieerden koortsachtig te zoeken naar een middel dat bescherming bood tegen gasaanvallen: gasmaskers (ook voor paarden, want paarden moesten in geval van nood de artilleriestukken wegtrekken). In 1916 was na vele proefnemingen het gasmasker zover ontwikkeld, dat het gas geen invloed meer had op de soldaten, mits men het masker op tijd had opgedaan. Na de slag die van 22 april tot 27 mei 1915 duurde waren de verliezen:

Engeland: 53.806.
Canada: 5469.
Duitsland: 34.933.
Frankrijk: ca. 10.000.
In deze cijfers zijn de gasslachtoffers opgenomen.

Van de Duitsers is bekend dat het de soldaten verboden was om over gas en gasslachtoffers te praten, zodat daar geen cijfers van bekend zijn.

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/wiki/index.php/Gasoorlog
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2010 10:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meierijsche Courant, Donderdag 27 Mei 1915.

Borkel en Schaft.

+ De alhier heerschende besmettelijke ziekte mond- en klauwzeer heeft zich heden tot een 12-tal stallen uitgebreid, ongeveer 60 koeien en ruim 100 schapen alsmede vele varkens en geiten zijn afgemaakt. Dank de strenge maatregelen heerscht de ziekte slechts in eene wijk of buurt der gemeente. De coöp. roomboterfabriek is stop gezet hetwelk eene enorme schade is voor de landbouwers daar dagelijks ruim 3000 kilo melk aan de fabriek werd geleverd.

+ Dinsdag herdacht onze eerwaarde Herder zijn 40-jarig priesterjubileum. Tot dankzegging werd dien dag een plechtige H. Mis opgedragen. Wegens tijdsomstandigheden had geen uiterlijk feestbetoon plaats.

http://www.shgv.nl/KrantenArtikelen/1915.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2010 10:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

George Grogan

George William St George Grogan VC CB CMG DSO & Bar (1 September 1875 - 3 January 1962) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 42 years old, and a Temporary Brigadier General in the Worcestershire Regiment, British Army, Commander 23rd Infantry Brigade during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 27 May 1918 at the River Aisne, France, Brigadier General Grogan was in command of the remnants of the infantry of a division and attached troops. His utter disregard for personal safety combined with sound practical ability helped to stay the onward thrust of the enemy. He rode up and down the front line encouraging his troops under artillery, trench mortar, rifle and machine-gun fire and when one horse was shot under him, he continued encouraging his men on foot until another horse was brought. As a result of his actions the line held.

He was A.D.C. to the King from 1920 to 1926.

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/George_Grogan/1

Brigadier-General George William St. George Grogan VC CB CMG DSO

Appointed Colonel of the Regiment on 2nd November 1938.

In November, 1938, an old and distinguished officer of the Regiment was appointed as Colonel. General Grogan was born on 1st September 1875, and first saw service with the West India Regiment in 1896. It was not until January 1908, that he joined the Worcestershire Regiment as a Captain. General Grogan’s earlier service was of that varied nature which must appeal to all those who search for the old element of adventure in soldiering. In 1898 he was in operations in Sierra Leone and at Lagos in the following year.

For five years from 1902 he served with the Egyptian Army.Lieut.-Colonel Grogan’s command of the 1st Battalion in France in World War 1 is described in detail by Captain FitzM. Stacke in his History of the Regiment. His leadership culminated in the action, which was to win the Victoria Cross on the Bouleuse Ridge on 29th May 1918. On that occasion only reckless bravery could save the day, and Colonel Grogan accepted the challenge.

It is perhaps appropriate to quote the citation: “Shells, bombs and bullets struck all round him and presently his horse was shot; but he mounted another horse and continued to ride along the firing line, cheering and encouraging his men, miraculously escaping death at every instant and inspiring all who saw him, both French and British.” A picture by Gilbert Holiday recording the event is in possession of the Regiment at Norton Barracks. Subsequently he commanded the 23rd Brigade.

After the war from May until October 1919, he commanded 238 Infantry Brigade in the Force operating in North Russia, later pro­ceeding to India to command the 3rd Battalion.

Lees verder op http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/wr.php?main=inc/c_grogan
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2010 10:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Joel Halliwell

Joel Halliwell VC (29 December 1873- 14 June 1956) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Details - He was 44 years old, and a Lance-Corporal in the 11th Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 27 May 1918 at Muscourt, France, when the remnants of the battalion were withdrawing and being closely engaged by the enemy, Lance-Corporal Halliwell, having captured a stray horse, rode out under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire and rescued a man from No Man's Land. He repeated this performance several times and succeeded in rescuing an officer and nine other ranks. He made a last effort to reach a wounded man but was driven back by the very close advance of the enemy.

The medal - The medal is in Middleton with his family.

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/Joel_Halliwell/1
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

27 mei 1915 | Nieuwsbericht | Oorlog in Alveringem

Octavien Lekeuche is op 14 februari 1890 geboren in het Waalse dorp Thimougies, nu een deelgemeente van Doornik. De zoon van Alphonse en Alodie Léonart is gehuwd met Alix Marie Joseph Deroulers. In 1908 treedt hij als beroepsvrijwilliger in dienst van het Belgisch leger.

Op 26 mei 1915 raakt hij gekwetst aan het bruggenhoofd in Diksmuide en wordt geëvacueerd naar de 1° Sectie Hospitalisering, dat ingericht is in het huis van handelaar Benoni Blomme langs de Lovaart in Fortem (Alveringem). Hij overlijdt daar 's anderendaags om 16.30 uur.

Het slachtoffer wordt op 28 mei 1915 begraven op het kerkhof van Alveringem, ten zuiden van de kerk, grafnummer 13, en op 1 augustus 1922 herbegraven op de Belgische militaire begraafplaats van Oeren, grafnummer 526.

http://www.oorlogserfgoedalveringem.be/nl/27-mei-1915
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Edmonton Capital, 27 mei 1914

http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/EDC/1914/05/27/1/Ar00113.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 21:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meierijsche Courant, Zaterdag 27 Mei 1916.

Valkenswaard. De zoo treurig om het leven gekomen jongeling Jansen uit Achel is gisteren alhier op het kerkhof begraven.

http://www.shgv.nl/KrantenArtikelen/1916.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 21:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter, dated May 27, 1917 from Harry Truman to Bess Wallace

May 27, 1917 - Westgate Hotel, Kansas City, Mo.

Dear Bessie:

Sunday Night

The train was late. It didn't arrive until ten-fifteen. Should have been in at nine. I didn't call up because I know you don't appreciate midnight calls. This letter should have reached you at ten o'clock this morning but the one I had written sounded so badly that I didn't send it. In fact it was both blue and mushy. They don't go well together or singly. This one may be as bad before I'm through. If it is, I won't send it either. I have written you dozens of epistles you have never seen. Whenever I'm particularly happy, or particularly the opposite, an insane desire to tell you about it possesses me and I write you about it. Generally I'm never half so badly, or so well, off as I at first thought, and you are therefore not worried with knowing what a very erratic and unstable person I am.

You know, I have been badly disappointed today. That dad-blasted mine has been sold twice and has come back to me both times because the brother of the man who owns the land the thing is on happens to own the adjoining mill and wants my mine to run through it. (Can you comprehend that Dutch statement?) There is a Bertha M. Clay plot connected with the thing. The men from whom the magnificent Mr. Culbertson made his purchase are bitter enemies of the Commerce Mining & Royalty Co., the richest outfit in the Oklahoma mining district. The Royalty Co. owns the land. The people we bought from owned the lease. Now the lease is going to quit very shortly and I had been led to believe that I could get another if the mill were running. I went to see the president of the Royalty Co. yesterday and he told me that he was of the opinion that he'd let his brother run the dirt from that mine through his mill, which is the adjoining one to mine and called the Lost Trail. My sale fell down because he said that, hence my happy feeling this evening. I still hope to arrange another lease because the former Grandview banker whom I never cared for very much is going to work for the Royalty Co. in the capacity of cashier of their new bank. I hope to be able to hand him a line of conversation that will cause him to make Mr. Robinson see me on this lease. (Robinson is the Royalty Co.'s president.) Maybe he can; maybe he won't. If not then it's the sheriff for the mine, unless I can ring in our friend J. S. from Ardmore. He hates mines and at present seems to love oil. Hope he stays that way except in one instance.

I seem to have a grand and admirable ability for calling tails when heads come up. My luck should surely change. Sometime I should win. I have tried to stick. Worked, really did, like thunder for ten years to get that old farm in line for some big production. Have it in shape and have had a crop failure every year. Thought I'd change my luck, got a mine, and see what I did get. Tried again in the other long chance, oil. Still have high hopes on that, but then I'm naturally a hopeful, happy person; one of the "Books in brooks, Tongues in trees, and Good in everything" sort of guy. Most men are liars-I'm one myself on occation (I'm not sure but that's sion)-and they all are where there's money in it. I was very, very impressionable when I was a kid and I believed all the Sunday school books and idealist dope we were taught and it's taken me twenty-odd years to find that Mark is right when he says that the boy who stole the jam and lied about it and killed the cat and sassed his ma, grew up and became a highly honored citizen and was sent to Congress, is absolutely right. The poor gink who stands around and waits for someone to find out his real worth just naturally continues to stand, but the gink who toots his horn and tells 'em how good he is makes 'em believe it when they know he's a bluff and would steal from his grandma.

I don't believe that. I'm just feeling that way now. If I can't win straight, I'll continue to lose. I'm the luckiest guy in the world to have you to love and to know that when I've arrived at a sensible solution of these direful financial difficulties I've gotten into, that I'll have the finest, best-looking, and all the other adjectives in the superlative girl in the world to make the happiest home in the world with. Now isn't that a real heaven on earth to contemplate? I think it is and I know I'll have just that in the not far off future, unless it is necessary for me to get myself shot in this war-and then I'll still find you somewhere. I dreamt that you and I were living in Rome when togas were the fashion. I am always dreaming of you. I'm never anywhere in a dream or out of it that I don't imagine you there, too. Last night I thought I was in an airplane in France. I fell about 17,000 feet and didn't get much hurt and I was idiot enough to weep because I couldn't see you in the hospital. It seemed that you were outside and they wouldn't let you in. Some dream, what? (I had a cheese omelet for supper.) I'm going to eat one every night.

You'll sure enough be bored when you get this if you do. But I just had to have a conversation with you. I can never say what I feel when I see you and anyway when a hardheaded American citizen gets to spouting his heart actions in Laura Jean Libby periods he just simply feels like an idiot and I do, but I mean all I've said about you and I'll keep hoping that J. S. Mullen stays by us till we get a gusher-and I can really show you how much I care.

Hope to see you right soon. Will have to go home tomorrow night to get a new set of collars, etc., as my grip has all second-handed ones. Can I come over Tuesday night? Just remember how crazy I am about you and forget all the rest.

Most sincerely,

Harry
http://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/personal/large/folder2/trans052717.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 21:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

"Een brug voor de Switch Road"

27 Mei 1917
Eene optelling om dezen tijd gedaan, geeft den volgenden uitslag: 735 mannen werken voor het engelsch leger aan wegen of waterdienst.

http://www.west-vlaanderen.be/genieten/Cultuur/musea/whmuseum/Documents/09ParijsBaertBinnen.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 21:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Armeense genocide: De Tijd, 27 mei 1916

Voor de Armeniërs - Het jammerlijke lot, dat de Armenische bevolking van Turkije getroffen heeft in dezen oorlog, heeft tot nog toe in Europa niet die deernisvolle belangstelling gevonden, die ook maar eenigszins in verhouding zou staan met het ontzaglijke lijden, dat geleden werd, en met de onvergeeflijke gruwelen, die gepleegd werden. Het schijnt, dat langzamerhand ons gevoel voor medelijden en rechtvaardigheid wordt afgestompt en plaats gaat maken voor geblaseerde berusting. Gelukkig heeft zich echter in Zwitserland een comité gevormd, dat die schuldige, ofschoon verklaarbare loomheid wil tegengaan, de oude Europeesche liefdadigheid weer wil opwekken tot hulpvaardigheid, en van de gedeporteerde Armenische bevolking redden wil, wat nog te redden valt.

Dit comité is in alle onpartijdigheid samengesteld. Het manifest, dat het heeft uitgevaardigd, draagt de onderteekening van een honderdtal Zwitsersche burgers, die voor twee derden in Duitsch-Zwitserland en voor één derde in Fransch-Zwitserland woonachtig zijn. Naast den steun van protestantsche geestelijken geniet het de medewerking van katholieke persoonlijkheden als Mgr. Esseiva, pater Michaëlian, baron de Montenach e.a. Politieke actie of vijandelijkheid tegenover een of andere mogendheid van Europa ligt zóó weinig in de bedoeling van het comité, dat de eerste brochure, die uitgegeven werd, wel in handen gesteld werd van alle Zwitsersche geestelijken, met zielzorg belast, maar tevens gedrukt werd als manuscript, omdat men geen brandstof wilde leveren voor licht ontvlambare journalistieke pennen. De tweede brochure nochtans, die onder denzelfden titel als de eerste verschenen is, namelijk "Quelques documents sur le sort des Arméniens en 1915", heeft men in den handel gebracht, en wordt verkocht ten bate der slachtoffers.

Met des te geruster geweten kon men, bij deze tweede brochure, van den aanvankelijken voorzichtigheidsmaatregel afwijken, omdat men ook thans weer, om naar het vermogen een misschien onvermijdelijk gevolg te keeren, zich zorgzaam onthouden had van alle sensationeel geschrijf. Slechts van volstrekt vertrouwbare personen heeft men inlichtingen aanvaard. In de keuze is men niet eenzijdig te werk gegaan. Naast gegevens, die verstrekt werden door Zwitsers en Amerikanen, vindt men ook mededeelingen, aan Duitschers ontleend. Jammer genoeg, zijn deze laatste niet zoo talrijk, als men gaarne zou wenschen. Vooral zijn deze berichten uit Duitsche bron schaarsch geworden, sinds de "Deutscher Hilfbund für christliches Liebeswerk in Oriënt" in zijn orgaan "Sonnenaufgang" van 1 Oct. 1915 de volgende noot liet afdrukken: "In ons voorgaand nummer hebben wij het verslag overgedrukt van een onzer Zusters over haar reisondervindingen. De aanvullende bijzonderheden, die ons in overvloed geworden, moeten wij ons voortaan onthouden te publiceeren. Onze vrienden zullen begrijpen, hoe zwaar ons dit valt. Maar de politieke toestand van ons land eischt dit." Gelukkig behoeven wij niet allen zooveel terughoudendheid te betrachten. Het comité, waarvan geest en samenstelling de uitsluitend menschlievende bedoeling waarborgt, heeft daarom ook niet gemeend zijn werkzaamheid te moeten staken. Het woord, dat bij een vroegere moordpartij gesproken zou zijn door den gezant eener buitenlandsche mogendheid: "Wij zijn hier in Konstantinopel alléén om de lijken te tellen" – dat woord is te schandelijk om nagezegd te worden door de niet-politieke bevolking van Europa. Getrouw aan zijn charitatieve bedoelingen, wil het Zwitsersche comité zich dan ook onthouden van alle polemiek. Op één punt heeft het nochtans, althans terloops, van dit voornemen moeten afwijken. Het mocht de bewering niet onweersproken laten, dat de Armenische moorden, slechts rechtvaardige terechtstellingen waren. In enkele zeer bezadigde bladzijden wordt de weerlegging van dit praatje geleverd. Niet ondoelmatig wordt hierbij het vroeger bericht aangehaald van een bekend telegram-bureau: "Het is totaal valsch, dat er in Turkije moordpartijen op de Armeniërs hebben plaats gehad. De Armeniërs van Erzeroem, Erzingan, Egin, Sassoun, Bitlis, Musch en Cilicië hebben trouwens geen enkele daad gesteld, waardoor de openbare orde en rust verstoord is of die tegen hen bijzondere maatregelen noodzakelijk gemaakt heeft. Dit weten overigens de consuls der onzijdige mogendheden."

Ook wij zullen ons niet verder inlaten met deze afgedane zaak. Wij zullen liever de woorden vernemen van een Duitsche missiezuster, die sinds jaren in Armenië werkzaam is en in het Aprilnummer van "Sonnenaufgang" schreef: "Zegt toch aan onze vrienden, dat zij niet ophouden te spreken en te pleiten ten gunste van de gedeporteerde Armeniërs. Indien er binnen een afzienbaren tijd geen verandering komt, zullen zij binnen enkele maanden uitgeroeid zijn. Klimaat, honger en ziekte dooden bij duizendtallen. Degenen die te Hama, te Homs en in de buurt van Damascus zijn, hebben betrekkelijk minder te verduren. Men laat ze met rust en zij kunnen zich levensmiddelen verschaften. Maar méér naar het Oosten, naar den Euphraat, worden zij voortgejaagd van de eene plaats naar de andere, mishandeld en uitgeschud. Velen, die wij persoonlijk kennen, zijn reeds omgekomen."

Volgens een betrouwbaar bericht, zou de Turksche minister van binnenlandsche zaken het aantal gedeporteerde Armeniërs zelf geschat hebben op 800.000, en het getal omgekomenen op 300.000.

Nog altijd kan dus Europa aan velen het leven redden. Moge dan ook het Zwitsersche comité veler steun ontvangen, opdat in een dankgebed moge omgezet worden de jammerklacht van één der gedeporteerden: "Is er wel een Onze Lieve Heer voor ons, Armeniërs?"

https://www.armeensegenocide.info/pers-nl/DT-27-5-1916.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 21:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Manifesto of the German Independent Social Democratic Party Against Imperialism.
Source: “The Manifesto of the German Independent Social Democratic Party Against Imperialism,” of 27.5.1918 in Justice, 4 July 1918

The Chambers are about to meet on the eve of the fifth year of the war. The hopes placed in them by large sections of the population have been completely deceived. The war, with its misery and absence of freedom, continues. Every day fresh victims disappear in the tombs. In the East the sword of the conqueror has imposed a state of peace which has provoked an intense rancour and has bred new germs of conquest. In the liberating struggles of the people of the old Tsarist Empire, German and Austrian bayonets have taken their part in favour of the counter revolution. The alliance of the armies of Central Europe, constituted recently, will also divide the States into two enemy camps, bristling with arms, in the future. The coalition on one side, concentrated on the development of all the methods of military power, will call forth a similar coalition on the other side. We are threatened with the danger of seeing the imperialist forces, after a short respite, begin a fresh struggle for world domination. So long as the international proletariat does not present a front against the representatives of a policy of violence eager for conquest, it is useless to dream of a general and lasting peace of the peoples.

The Iron Weight on the German People.

Internal reaction responds to the policy of violence abroad, Heavier than ever rests the iron weight of the state of siege on the German People. It is our Party, the Independent Socia1 Democratic Party, with the workers who compose who feel this most heavily. Freedom of speech is throttled, and the political policy of the working class is chained down more than ever. All repressive methods of military dictatorship are employed against those who remain faithful to their convictions and will not abandon International Social-Democracy

Granting this reactionary state of affairs, it is bound to affect the question of equal suffrage for the Prussian Landtag. The parties of the Prussian Landtag majority are opposing with all their strength the slightest increase in the rights of the people. The proposals of the Government, which have already been pruned in a manner that has mutilated the free and equal suffrage of the workers and strengthened the reactionary forces, are not enough. The desire is to replace the three class franchise by plural voting in favour of education and possession. The Government revealed its real intentions when it abstained from employing every efficacious means for enforcing even the mutilated equal suffrage against the majority of the Landtag, hostile to the working classes.

The Struggle Against Internal Reaction.

The proletariat must uphold its class interests against the declared class interests of the agrarian and capitalist reactionaries. The struggle against internal reaction is also a struggle for a durable peoples’ peace; for the internal enemies of the people are at the same time the prophets of a policy of violence abroad.

Workers – comrades, citizens! You can expect nothing from Governments and Parliaments but what you do by your own opinions, your own force.

The “Peace of Violence” in the East.

While you have been deprived of your solemnly promised sole means of right, there has been imposed upon you an aggravation of your already insupportable conditions of life. On June 16 the already meagre bread ration was once more reduced. Now again the Agrarians are at work to exploit to their profit, the terrible dearness of living which exists to-day, The “Peace of Violence” in the East has not given the bread to the German people so often promised. All the promises about the improvement of feeding which were based on the conquering marches across Roumania, the conclusion of the peace with Russia, and above all, on the so much celebrated “bread peace” with the Ukraine, have not given the expected results. The expansion of the peace-by-violence methods has shown itself equally on the economic as on the political field. Events have proved most rapidly, even to the blind, how right was the Independent Social Democratic Party when, faithful to the principles of International Social Democracy, it voted against those “peace treaties” which violated, in the most brutal manner, the right of the peoples freely to dispose of themselves. In agreement with the bourgeois parties, the Government Social Democrats have voted the peace with the Ukraine, and by that action have become, as in all their war policy, accomplices of the policy of imperial violence. Thus they are serving as supporters of internal reaction, and consequently bear the responsibility for the aggravation of the food situation.

An Appeal to the German Workers

Workers, Comrades, Citizens,

Denounce lithe reactionary policy of the Government and the bourgeois parties! Protest whenever you find the opportunity in public meetings, against being deprived of your political rights! Arouse the indifferent and the apathetic! Awaken the public political conscience and increase the energies of your organisations! Present a bold front against the aggravation of the conditions of life! In your meetings and intimate circles, spread the light about the reasons for the reduction of the bread ration and the real cause of misery of the people during the war! Support with all your power the struggle which the groups of the Independent Social Democratic Party are carrying on in the Parliaments for Peace, for liberty and for bread.

Workers, Comrades, Citizens,

Away with all discouragement, all pusillanimity, all disaffection! Arm the proletariat for the inevitable struggles for a better future! Be faithful to the principles of International Social Democracy
!

Berlin, May 27, 1918

http://www.marxists.org/history/international/social-democracy/justice/1918/07/german-manifesto.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 21:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Robert A. Little

Robert Alexander Little DSO & Bar, DSC & Bar (19 July 1895 – 27 May 1918) is officially regarded as the most successful Australian flying ace of World War I, with a total of forty-seven aerial victories. Born in Victoria, he travelled to England in 1915 and learnt to fly at his own expense before joining the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). Posted to the Western Front in June 1916, he flew Sopwith Pups, Triplanes and Camels with No. 8 Squadron RNAS, achieving thirty-eight victories within a year and earning the Distinguished Service Order and Bar, the Distinguished Service Cross and Bar, and the French Croix de Guerre. Rested in July 1917, he volunteered to return to the front in March 1918 and scored a further nine victories with No. 3 Squadron RNAS (later No. 203 Squadron RAF) before he was killed in action on the night of 27 May, aged twenty-two.

Lees verder: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_A._Little
_________________

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– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 27 Mei 2019 9:51, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2019 9:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Battle of L'Aisne, May 27 - June 16, 1918

Uit de US National Archives: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7zxZyam4lg
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2019 10:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bornem in WOl - Uit de dagboeken van Pater Benedictus Van Doninck

Donderdag 27 mei 1915 (dag 298)
Geen kanon te horen
Om 9 ½ bezoek van madame de Gravin, die vertelt dat
Jacq. zich te Brussel in de kliniek oefent in het ziekenverplegen.
Om 1 uur gaat Leo naar den bouw voor de bedeling der
werklozen. Deze zullen eerdaags door de gemeente aan
het werk gezet worden met grachten en straten te
verbeteren, bos en heigronden te ontginnen, enz. Er
wordt door het steunkomiteit een wekelijkse hulp in
natura verleend aan de huisvader, 3 frank aan de vrouw,
en aan kinderen boven de 16 jaar elk 1,50. Aan kinderen
onder de 16 jaar 0,50 centiemen elk, zodat de
huishoudens met grote kinderen best varen.
Om 1 ½ brengt madame de Gravin een bouquet bloemen
naar ’t kerkhof.

Ook in PDF: http://www.wo1bornem.be/documents/Van_Doninck/1915_05_Van_Doninck.pdf
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