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26 mei

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2006 5:49    Onderwerp: 26 mei Reageer met quote

Die Franzosen südlich Douaumont zurückgeworfen

Großes Hauptquartier, 26. Mai.1916

Westlicher Kriegsschauplatz:
Links der Maas wurde ein von Turkos ausgeführter Handgranatenangriff westlich der Höhe 304 abgeschlagen.
Auf dem östlichen Maasufer setzten wir die Angriffe erfolgreich fort. Unsere Stellungen westlich des "Steinbruchs" wurden erweitert, die Thiaumontschlucht überschritten und der Gegner südlich des Forts Douaumont weiter zurückgeworfen. Bei diesen Kämpfen wurden weitere 600 Gefangene gemacht, 12 Maschinengewehre erbeutet.
In der Gegend von Loivre nordwestlich von Reims machten die Franzosen einen ergebnislosen Gasangriff.
Das im Tagesbericht vom 21. Mai erwähnte südlich von Chateau-Salins abgeschossene feindliche Flugzeug ist das fünfte von Leutnant Wintgens im Luftkampf außer Gefecht gesetzte.
Östlicher Kriegsschauplatz:
Keine wesentlichen Ereignisse.

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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2006 5:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

May 26

1914 Gavrilo Princip sets out from Belgrade for Sarajevo

On May 26, 1914, 19-year-old Gavrilo Princip sets out from Belgrade on a 10-day-long journey through rough countryside, heading towards Sarajevo and a planned rendezvous with fellow young nationalist agitators.

Born in 1894 in the hamlet of Gornji Obljaj in western Bosnia, near Dalmatia, Princip was a Bosnian Serb who left home when he was 13 to study in Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital. Slight and frail, he volunteered for Serbian military service in the Balkan wars in 1912 and 1913, but was turned down by an officer who told him he was too weak. Bitterly disappointed, Princip found refuge in radical nationalism, joining on with the so-called Young Bosnia movement, a loose grouping of students and apprentices with revolutionary aspirations.

When Princip and his comrades learned in the spring of 1914 of the upcoming visit by Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, to Sarajevo that June, they hatched a plan to assassinate him. Such plots had been attempted before, most recently the previous January, and had failed. As a prominent symbol of the Austrian regime, Franz Ferdinand was a likely target for Slavic nationalists angry over the Austrian annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1908 and anxious about the possibility of further aggression by the empire in the Balkans; in fact, Franz Ferdinand was the leading advocate for peace and restraint within his country’s political and military establishment.

With weapons—including bombs, revolvers and cyanide capsules with which to commit suicide after their murderous work was done—supplied by members of the shadowy Serbian terrorist organization Narodna Odbrana, or the Black Hand, Princip left Belgrade on May 26, 1914, and traveled through secret channels, also facilitated by the Black Hand, for nearly 10 days before meeting up with his fellow conspirators in Sarajevo. Less than a month later, on June 28, Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie made their official appearance in Sarajevo to review the maneuvers of the 15th and 16th Corps of the Austrian army. After a bomb thrown by Princip’s cohort failed to achieve its deadly objective, rolling off the back of the royal car and wounding an officer and some bystanders, the archduke’s procession took a wrong turn. Their car happened to stop on a corner where Princip was loitering; he fired on Franz Ferdinand and Sophie at point- blank range, killing them almost instantly and sparking a chain of complicated events that would lead not only Austria-Hungary and Serbia but a host of great and small nations in Europe and beyond into the devastating conflict that would become known as the First World War.
www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 22:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant, 26 mei 1915
Bron: Koninklijke Bibliotheek

De oorlog
Te Konstantinopel is – naar Reuter uit Sofia aan de Engelsche bladen meldt – de archivaris van het Grieksche patriarchaat in hechtenis genomen. De archivaris, Papadopoulos, wordt beschuldigd de hand te hebben gehad in het beweerde complot der Armeniërs tegen de Turksche regeering. De arrestatie van Papadopoulos heeft te Konstantinopel groot opzien gewekt; men verwacht er dat nu door de Turksche autoriteiten een huiszoeking zal worden gedaan in het patriarchaat.

http://www.armeensegenocide.info/pub_geschied/de_oorlog_4.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 22:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australia and the Gallipoli Campaign

26 May 1915
Commencement of a factory at Anzac Cove to make periscope rifles. This device, which allowed a soldier to aim and fire at the enemy from his trench without showing himself, was invented by Lance-Corporal W C B Beech, 2nd Battalion (New South Wales), of Sydney.

Turkish snipers opened fire down Monash Valley from a new trench near the Nek. Fifty Australians were hit until a field gun knocked out the trench.

Four destroyers arriving at Anzac Cove with troops were shelled. The shelling killed four soldiers and a seaman and wounded 41 others of whom seven subsequently died. As a result daytime landings ceased. After this all troops and animals were landed at night.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/australia-gallipoli-campaign/may-1915.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 22:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Battle of Festubert, 15-25 May 1915

26 May 1915 - Several enemy counter-attacks are beaten off as the forward infantry consolidate the positions won in the last few days.

Casualties - More than 16,000 casualties were sustained in the attack at Festubert, in support of the much larger French offensive to the South at Vimy Ridge. French losses there were over 102,000, against German almost 50,000, including those at Festubert.

Lessons and the shell crisis - The battle reinforced the view that the BEF had a serious deficiency of artillery, particularly heavy weapons, shells, (especially the high explosive type that was required to destroy trenches and strong points) and trench weaponry especially bombs. The Canadian units were reporting very serious problems with their standard-issue Ross rifle, and most infantry units reported that they did not have the full complement of machine-guns available due to losses in action.

On 15 May 1915 an article appeared in The Times, written by military correspondent Colonel Repington and based on information given to him by an exasperated Commander-in-Chief, Sir John French. The latter also sent copies of all correspondence between him and the Government on the question of the supply of ammunition to David Lloyd George, Arthur Balfour and Bonar Law, MP's. The scandal that broke as the public read that Tommies were losing their lives unnecessarily as a result of the shortages proved to be the downfall of the Liberal Government under Asquith. The formation of a Coalition Government and the appointment of Lloyd George as first Minister of Munitions was an important step towards ultimate victory.

There is no specific memorial to the attack at Festubert.

British casualties in the Battle of Festubert
2nd Division: 5,284 of which 178 officers (engaged for 6 days)
7th Division: 4,123 of which 167 officers (3)
7th (Meerut) Division: 2,521 of which 102 officers (5)
47th (2nd London) Division: 2,355 of which 166 officers (10)
Canadian Division: 2,204 of which 97 officers (8)

Retrospective - Hampered by the shortage of artillery ammunition and guns, and not helped by poor weather, the British Army achieved a small-scale tactical success at Festubert by capturing enemy positions. The offensive fighting potential of the Territorial Force Divisions, and the mixture of veteran and newly-trained troops in the "Regular" units that had been devastated at Ypres, survived a harsh winter and taken a mauling a few days earlier at Aubers, had been tested and found to be encouraging. But their efforts had little or no strategic impact: the enemy were even able to reinforce, despite the continued efforts of the French at Vimy.

The main factors affecting the outcome of this battle were:

•Little surprise was achieved
•The duration and weight of the British bombardment was in places sufficient to break the German wire and breastwork defences, or to destroy or suppress the front-line machine-guns
•German artillery and free movement of reserves were insufficiently suppressed
•Trench layout, traffic flows and organisation behind the British front line did not allow for easy movement of reinforcements and casualties
•Reserves had been too far from the front to be able to reinforce success; by the time they arrived the enemy had stabilised the position
•British artillery equipment and ammunition were in poor condition: the first through over-use, the second through faulty manufacture
•British intelligence, ground and air observation did not detect the important establishement of the new German line
•When not immediately cut down by enemy machine-guns, British infantry had good offensive fighting quality and abilities in close trench conditions; but British bombs (grenades) were very suspect and gave a disadvantage in close-in fighting.

http://www.1914-1918.net/bat11A.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 22:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Fred Garrett War Diary

26 May 1915 Wednesday - We anticipated an attack last night for since the "Triumph" was sunk we could not see any battle ships on in the Gulf from our position anyway.
The 2nd Light Horse relieved us this morning. They have lost 150 men already after only a fortnight of trench work.

Snipers were hot this morning potting at us from the top of the gully on our left flank, a new position for them. Every now and then one heard the call for stretcher-bearers coming from

the bottom of the ravine below. Six New Zealanders were shot before breakfast just a few yards below our dugout. Some of them as they slept. Our snipe hunters got busy on the opposite of the gully.

After the usual waiting about extended from 9.00 am to midday, we entered our new bivouac in a small gully just above Brigade Headquarters. We will not be so comfortable here as we were in our rabbit warrens on the top of Pope's Position, and though removed from the trenches not so safely protected from snipers and shrapnel. Alex and I have taken up a claim under the lee of a 5 foot bank and by fastening a couple of spare ground sheets together have contrived a sort of lean to, by means of sticks and string. We are not allowed to burrow in as the soil would probably cave in so we must take our chances from shrapnel.

The Quarter Master has begun to issue lime juice every second night now. We got some vegetable chips issued the other day but they were too much trouble. After soaking them for a day and boiling for ¾ of an hour they were still uncooked so we tossed them out. Potato dried is also another item. Though we could do with plenty of vegetables the chaps won't be bothered with them.

26 May 1915 Wednesday cont. - The various brands of jams we get cause a lot of amusement. Sir Tom Looten was a great joke in Egypt and he was cursed up hill and dale for his "mixed fruit" and "plum and apple". But he has deserted us, now we have got to the firing line, and another big pot in the shape of "Sir Joseph Paxton" is attending to the sweet tooths among us. We also get jam from "Tickler", "Pink", and "Deakin" which names supply the cue for further wit.

I mentioned somewhere before that our water for drinking was brought from the Nile. I hear however, that it is spring water, medicated and sterilised. Water is easily procured as will be imagined when I say that one of the enemy's big shells dug a hole sufficient to strike water.

http://www.grantsmilitaria.com/garrett/html/may1915.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 22:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

First World War Poets

Julian Grenfell - 1 Royal Dragoons (Captain)
Awarded DSO for action recorded in diary 15/16 November 1914.
13 May entry 1.30 pm. He was severely wounded.
Death on 26 May 1915 recorded in the casualty list Appendix 1 May 1915.
Obituary in The Times 28 May 1915 page 5.
Officers Who Died in the Great War page 21.

http://yourarchives.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php?title=First_World_War_Poets

Julian Grenfell

Julian Henry Francis Grenfell DSO (30 March 1888 - 26 May 1915), was a British soldier and poet of World War I.

Grenfell joined the army in 1910, and was awarded a Distinguished Service Order in 1914.

On 13 May 1915 as a Captain in the Royal Dragoons Julian stood talking with other officers, a shell landed a few yards from them, and a splinter of the shell hit him in the head. He was taken to a hospital in Boulogne where he died of his wounds 13 days later with his mother, father and sister at his bedside. He was 27 years old and was buried at the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

The day after his death, together with news of his death, there was published in The Times for the first time his most famous poem 'Into Battle'.

In a letter that was written in October 1914, Grenfell wrote "I adore war. It is like a big picnic but without the objectivelessness of a picnic. I have never been more well or more happy." This letter became infamous when its publication sparked a backlash of arguments that it was naive and that it strengthened propaganda in the media, which had led to thousands of young men signing up to the British Army, under false pretences.

Grenfell perhaps represented the last generation of young men for whom war was considered mainly to bring glory rather than suffering. Scholars have argued that had he lived, Grenfell might well have become disillusioned like his fellow war poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen. The latter referred ironically to how young warriors' "wounds in umentionable places" reduced their romantic warrior status in the eyes of young women.

Julian's younger brother Gerald William (Billy) Grenfell was killed in action on 30 July 1915 within a mile of where Julian had been wounded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_Grenfell#Military_service

War Office, 1st Jaiwary, 1915.

His Majesty the KING has been graciously
pleased to approve of the appointment of the
undermentioned Officers to be Companions of
the Distinguished Service Order, in recognition
of their services with the Expeditionary Force,
specified below: —

Lieutenant The Honourable Julian Henry
Francis Grenfell, 1st (Royal) Dragoons.
On the 17th November he succeeded in
reaching a point behind the enemy's trenches
and making an excellent reconnaissance,
furnishing early information of a pending
attack by the enemy.

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/29024/supplements/9
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

MILITARY MEDALS AWARDED TO MEMBERS OF QUEEN ALEXANDRA'S IMPERIAL MILITARY NURSING SERVICE AND THE TERRITORIAL FORCE NURSING SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR

COLHOUN, Annie Rebecca (later Mrs. Crofton)
Staff Nurse, QAIMNS Reserve
London Gazette 26 May 1917

For conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty during an enemy air raid. She attended to, and provided for the safety of, helpless patients. She was assisting Staff Nurse Dewar and the latter was fatally wounded, and although the tent was full of smoke and acrid fumes, and she had been struck by a fragment of bomb, she attended to Staff Nurse Dewar and also to the case of a helpless patient.

http://www.scarletfinders.co.uk/121.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

26 May, 1917

First US troops arrive in France.

http://www.canadiangreatwarproject.com/writing/Overview.asp
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

REPLY FROM JOFFE, SOVIET REPRESENTATIVE IN BERLIN, TO A STATEMENT BY ESTONIAN REPRESENTATIVES IN BERLIN ON ESTONIAN INDEPENDENCE, TRANSMITTED THROUGH THE GERMAN FOREIGN MINISTER

26 May 1918
Izvestia, 6 June 1918

In acknowledging the receipt of Your Excellency's note, and its enclosures, containing the declarations of the Estonian and Livonian nobility on the independence of Estonia and Livonia, I have the honour to inform Your Excellency that I was unable to accept from the three representatives of the Estonian and Livonian nobility who called upon me the document which supposedly gives the declaration of Estonian and Livonian independence, since its acceptance might be interpreted as recognition of their independence by the Government of the Russian Federal Socialist Republic.

In my note Of 24 April I had the honour of entering an emphatic protest, on behalf of my Government, and in keeping with the Brest Treaty of Peace, against any decision being made, one way or the other, in regard to the destiny of Estonia and Livonia without the previous consent of the workers' andpeasants' Government of the Russian Republic. To this I added that my Government, while recognizing the unrestricted right of every nation to self-determination, will never accept the decision of a small group ofpeople as the expression of the will of the entire nation.

What I said in my note can be supplemented by the fact that the representatives of the Estonian and Livonian nobility who handed me the document could not claim the right to speak in the name of the entire population of Estonia and Livonia; may I substantiate this statement by the following considerations:

Firstly: Certain members of the Estonian-Lettish delegation which has arrived in Berlin gave me a formal statement that they did not consider themselves entitled to speak on behalf of the entire nation, since they were not elected, but appointed by the (German) authorities.

Secondly: Of the total Of 21 district elders who, in the Assembly which met on 12 April, represented the peasant population, 18 stated officially that they had no right to speak on beha4f of the Estonian nation, and protested solemnly against

Thirdly: Thousands of citizens in the urban and rural districts of Estonia and Livonia openly protested against such an artificial and forcible separation of these territories from Russia.

Consequently the document transmitted to me by Your Excellency can only be regarded as the expression of the will of a small part of the Estonian and Livonian populations, that small part being the upper ranks of their nobility.

While maintaining the point of view expressed here, I am forwarding the document transmitted to me by Your Excellency to my Government in Moscow.

http://www.marxists.org/history/ussr/government/foreign-relations/1918/May/26.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Clayton M. Sherwood: Diary of Foreign Service

May 26. Sunday [1918] - Off in morn[ing]. Took bath in P.M. and took walk with Bomka and Thomas to find trenches but only got close to 3rd line where bomb practice was going on. After supper went to Martincourt to see Bellingham [from Plainwell, see May 5 entry]. Went to see their (B bat[tery]) guns and around an old castle where French men are now quartered. Built hundreds of years ago, rich old man lives there yet. Walls and courtyard still there and what may have been a moat, mostly torn down.

http://webspace.webring.com/people/pj/jcsherwood1950/neville/WarDiaryMay18.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

‘Not Again' - The German Offensive on the Aisne, 27 May 1918

(...) By 26 May 1918 the German offensive was expected within 24 hours as deserters and prisoners confirmed that the next German offensive would be on the Chemin des Dames. Officers recorded waiting during the ominous silence from the German guns in a scene reminiscent of that from ‘Journey's End'. (...)

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-on-land/battlefields/1031-not-again-german-offensive-aisne-27-may-1918.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diary of 38 years old Lieutenant J . Miquelis, 173e territorial Brigade. Cerny en Laonnois sector. Chemin Des Dames.

26 May 1918 - In the evening, order to stand to and before night to collect ammunitions and barbed wire. 11 pm, order to shelter the men against bombardment and to get out after artillery barrage passing. The cooks stay in Troyon with the sick men. Enemy shellfire begins at 12 pm 40 very violent. First tear gas shells: Sergeant Fersal and the sentry outside come in saying : “ Gas gas !” and spew up all they have.
I put under culver just one sentry to be relieve every half an hour with order to bring me any man who will pass by in the large communication trench of our trench, whatever direction he goes. I order to wear gas helmets, to load rifles, to open hand-grenades boxes and to install them on the steps of our shelter, to close the entrances with canvas sprinkled with hyposulfite
of soda ( with vermorel sprayer)
The enemy barrage moves on , it comes close then goes away; it seems more intense on our left. Under heavy shell burst the shelter pitch. I put myself under the biggest wooden beamof our shelter with a spade and a pickaxe on my side and I wait. I have in front of myself the map of the sector and signals code. At any moment I wait to be buried.
French shells pass obliquely over our shelter; it is the 75mm battery of Paissy village which alone unmastered , counterstroke. Inside my shelter the tempest lamp is blown twice by the explosions.

(...?) Around 4.30 Jammes , watcher, comes down the steps and shouts me : “the Boches are here ! they have shot at me !” .I answer him : “you had the wind up; it’s a shell splinter which has passed by your ears. Go back to your post. I come with you.”. He half turns . Climbing up the stair I take two hand-grenades in hands from the box. Jammes has a look outside and return like the wind saying :” I tell you they are here !”. I go to the entrance, which the opening is sheltered against shell splinters by a wooden culver with logs covered with earth. In the trench, a Boche is knelt down, aims at me with his Mauser. I jump on the right to reach the large communication trench and to get rid myself of this nuisance with my hand-grenades. On the parapet of the communication trench I see feet, I watch up: a Boche looked at me coming, his automatic pistol in hand, aimed at me ; surprise I turn round . On the culvert, 6 Boches overcame me with their automatic pistols in hand. They speak to me in German , and show me to enter the shelter; I reply in French. My quartermaster sergeant Baccou comes and shouts at me : “ My Lieutenant , don’t shoot, they are English who come to help us. ( We had on our right , near Craonne , an English Divison reconstituted after Montdidier rout)
“- They are Boches, you do not see their helmets ?”

(...?) "My quartermaster rush for ward inside the shelter. After having again negociate a little bit with the Germans without understanding each other, I hide in the parapet my hand-grenades by now impossible to use and I decide to enter the shelter to destroy the signal codes and the map sector. I rush down the stairs. My men were inside the first room, paralysed with fear. I shout at them : “ Go to the other exit ! join the warrant officer’s platoon” and I run to where mes documents were. I burnt them. At this moment, hand-grenades thrown by the Boches burst inside the shelter and the explosion put out of fire my documents which I blaze up again. None of my men had been hit because they had quickly obeyed my order.

They flow back to the second exit which is also on guard.” To the third exit !” My documents destroyed, I follow the men in the dark. A man said “My lieutenant do not leave me !”
“- Hang’s up my greatcoat “
The exit is collapsed by the shells. I walk on all fours in the running soil, tugging at the man hanging my greatcoat from time to time .I reach the opening and the trench and go to the right vers The Poteau d4Ailles, but I am quickly stopped by my men who flow back : We are surrounded !”.

Lieutenant Miquelis was taken prisoner . He went back to France on 23rd December 1918. He was a teacher and passed away in 1971.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=44335&st=25
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

V. I. Lenin - Theses On The Current Situation, Written: 26 May, 1918

1) The Commissariat for War to be converted into a Commissariat for War and Food-i.e., 9/10 of the work of the Commissariat for War to be concentrated on reorganising the army for the war for grain and on waging this war-for three months: June-August.

2) Martial law to be declared throughout the country during this period.

3) The army to be mobilised, selecting its sound elements, and 19-year-olds to be called up, at any rate in certain regions, for systematic military operations to fight for, win, collect and transport grain and fuel.

4) Shooting for indiscipline to be introduced.

5) The success of detachments to be measured by success in obtaining grain and by practical results in collecting grain surpluses.

6) The tasks of the military campaign should be formulated as fdllows:
a) the collection of stocks of grain for feeding the population;
b) ditto-for three months' food reserve for war;
c) safeguarding stocks of coal, collecting them and increas-ing output.

7) The detachments of the active army (active against kulaks, etc.) to consist of from one-third to one-half (in each detachment) of workers and poor peasants of the famine-stricken gubernias.

8) Each detachment to be issued two kinds of instruction:
a) ideological-political, on the importance of victory over famine and the kulaks, on the dictatorship of the proletar-iat as the working people's power;
b) military-organisational, on the internal organisation of the detachments, on discipline, on control and written documents of control for each operation, etc.

9) A collective liability of the whole detachment to be Introduced, for example the threat of shooting every tenth man-for each case of plunder.

10) All means of transport belonging to rich persons in the towns to be mobilised for work In transporting grain; well-to-do classes to be mobilised to act as clerks and stewards.

11) If signs of demoralisation of the detachments become threateningly frequent, the "sick" detachments to be sent back after a month, i.e., exchanged, to the place from which they came, for report and "treatment".

12) The following to be adopted both in the Council of People's Commissars and In the Central Executive Commit-tee:
(a) declaration that the country is in a state of grave danger as regards food;
(b) martial law;
(c) mobilisation of the army, together with its reorganisation as mentioned above, for the campaign for grain;
(d) in each uyezd and volost with grain surpluses, immediate compilation of a list of rich owners of land (kulaks), grain traders, etc., making them personally responsible for the collection of all grain surpluses;
(e) the appointment to each military detachment-at the rate of at least one out of approximately ten men-of er-sons with a party recommendation of the R.C.P., the Eeft Socialist-Revolutionaries or the trade unions.

13) In implementing the grain monopoly the most vig-orous measures for assistance to the rural poor to be made obligatory without shrinking from any financial sacrifices, and measures for free distribution among them of part of the grain surpluses collected from the kulaks, side by side with ruthless suppression of kulaks who withhold grain surpluses.

Endnote - Theses on the Current Situation were written when the country was undergoing a very serious food shortage. The Council of People's Commissars was guided by these theses on May 28, 1918, when it passed a decision on food policy (see Lenin Miscellany XVIII, p. 95) instructing the People’s Commissariat for Food to draw up by the following day an appeal to the workers and peasants on the organisation of armed detachments to be used in the campaign for grain. The appeal, which was drawn up on the basis of Lenin’s theses, was approved by the Government on May 29 and published in the newspapers on May 31 on behalf of the Council of People’s Commissars.

http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1918/may/26.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ASN Aircraft accident 26-MAY-1919 Tarrant Tabor

Date: 26-MAY-1919
Type: Tarrant Tabor.
Operator: W.G.Tarrant.
Registration: F 1765.
Fatalities: Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location: R.A.E Farnborough, United Kingdom
Phase: Take off
Nature: Test

Narrative:
The Tabor was an all-wood triplane bomber intended to carry bombs to the German capital, Berlin.
With a wingspan of 131 feet, 3 inches ( 40.02 metres ) and powered by six 450 HP Napier Lion water-cooled engines, four tractor and two pusher, it was briefly the largest aircraft of its time.
Only a single prototype was constructed and it crashed on its very first take off, resulting in the project being abandoned.
As the Tabor rolled down the Royal Aircraft Establishment airfield at Farnborough the pilots advanced the throttles of the two engines mounted on the upper wings.
These engines were mounted so far above the centre of gravity that opening them up to full power created a turning moment that tipped the Tabor onto its nose, crushing the forward section of the fuselage and killing the two pilots, Captains Frederick G. Dunn and P.T.Rawlings.

http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=59701
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Siberian Army

The Siberian Army was formed on 26 May 1918 in Novonikolaevsk after the overthrow of the Bolshevik authority of the Temporary Siberian Government using the base staff of the Western Siberia Military District. On 13 June 1918, it was the Western Siberia Independent Army and was renamed on 27 June 1918 to the Siberian Army. The staff of the army coordinated the activity of all White Forces in Siberia and the Far East. At the beginning of June, the Army totaled 4000 men. By 18 June, there were 6047 (4332 rifles, 1215 sabers, and 500 unarmed soldiers). At the end of June, 7600 men, 19 cannons, and 30 machineguns. By the middle of July, there were 23,400 men. By 31 July, there were 6970 officers, 28,229 volunteers. By 8 August, there were more than 40,000 men (nearly 10,000 officers and the remainder were volunteers). By 20 September, 1918, the Army had called up about 166,000 men and was already larger than the Volunteer Army. The combat composition of the Army on 1 September was 60,200 men (according to other data, there were only 37,600 men, 70 cannons, and 184 machineguns), and on 1 October, there were 10,700 officers, 59,900 men, and 113,900 unarmed soldiers. The Siberian Army was renamed to the Siberian Independent Army by 24 December 1918. By the end of April, 1919, the Siberian Independent Army had approximately 40,000 soldiers (this is the combat component). By the end of Spring 1919, the Army had liberated Okhansk, Osu, Sarapul, and Izhevsk. By June, the Army had split into Northern and Southern Groups, Composite Shock Siberian and 8th Kamsk Army Corps', and the 1st Cavalry Division. In July 1919, the Army totaled 350,000 men (56,600 rifles, 3900 sabers, 600 machineguns, 164 cannons, 4 armored trains, and 9 airplanes).

Lees verder op http://www.charlottegarrison.org/BARRAGE/Scenarios_OBs/RCWSiberiaOB.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

26 May 1919, Commons Sitting

GREAT BRITAIN AND AMERICA (TRADE RIVALS).


HC Deb 26 May 1919 vol 116 cc805-6 805

Mr. GRATTON DOYLE asked the Prime Minister whether it has been brought to his notice that reports are in circulation in America that the British censorship is making use of its opportunities to gain information concerning the business of American firms for the benefit of British trade rivals; whether he will set up an inquiry to discover the cause of these reports; and whether steps will be taken immediately to remove from the minds of the American public such suspicion as has been aroused?

The FINANCIAL SECRETARY to the WAR OFFICE (Mr. Forster) Yes, Sir; these reports have been brought to my 806 notice. In no ease, however, have sufficient particulars been supplied to enable the statement to be investigated. Without any particulars it is, however, possible to give a definite assurance that at no time has the British Censorship been employed to assist British firms at the expense of their rivals in Allied or neutral countries. If any specific instance of alleged abuse of the censorship is given, it will, of course, be immediately investigated, but, as I have stated, no such instance has been given.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/may/26/great-britain-and-america-trade-rivals
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Crimes and Mass Violence of the Russian Civil Wars (1918-1921)

1919; May 26-28: Trostyanets (province of Podolsk): Massacres and looting by local farmers and deserters ("Greens"). Estimated number of victims: 400.

http://www.massviolence.org/Crimes-and-mass-violence-of-the-Russian-civil-wars-1918?artpage=3
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2010 23:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Timeline of the Irish War of Independence

26 May 1919: Members of Dáil Éireann sent a statement concerning "Ireland’s Case for Independence" to the Paris Peace Conference.

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Timeline_of_the_Irish_War_of_Independence#2.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2010 8:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1917)

26 mei 1917 - Er was in de enclaves van Baarle-Hertog gebrek aan suiker en rijst. (Gemeentearchief Baarle-Hertog; 2.073.564 Register van Briefwisseling)

http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=190:08-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1917&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 19:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Passagiersschip 'Rijndam'

Het passagiersschip 'Rijndam' van de Holland-Amerika Lijn, varende van New York naar Rotterdam, komt op de Atlantische Oceaan 179 mijl van New York in aanvaring met het Noorse ss. 'Jos J. Cuneo' (800 brt). Hierbij wordt de 'Rijndam' ernstig beschadigd ter hoogte van het achtermachinekamerschot. Een deel van de passagiers en bemanning wordt overgenomen door het Noorse schip. De 'Rijndam' keert vervolgens weer terug naar New York.

Bron: L.L. von Münching: 'De Ned. koopvaardij in de eerste oorlogsmaanden van 1914' in: 'DBW' jrg. 54 nr. 11 (1999).

http://koopvaardij.web-log.nl/koopvaardij/2009/05/26-mei-1915.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+typepad%2Fkoopvaardij%2Fkoopvaardij+%28Koopvaardij%29
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 19:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Bellevue Times, 26 mei 1916



http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/BVT/1916/05/26/1/Ad00103_21.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

26 May 1918 - 3257 Pte William James Archbold, 41st Bn AIF.



A farmer from Mackay, Queensland, William was born in January 1898. He enlisted into the AIF on 21 February 1916 and embarked from Sydney (for the UK) on 22 December the same year. Training in the UK at Codford and Bulford, he spent a month in hospital and also underwent Field Punishment No 2 for a misdemeanour in March 1917. William set sail for France on 14 December 1917 and joined his unit near the frontline in Belgium the following day. During the German offensive of March 1918, his battalion was rushed southwards to help stem the tide of the German advance in front of Amiens where he was killed, near Villers Bretonneux, on 26 May 1918. He is now buried in Adelaide Cemetery, Villers Bretonneux.

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/component/content/1853.html?task=view
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Act of the Independence of Georgia, 26 May 1918



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DRG_act_of_independence_1918.JPG
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australian soldiers, Heytesbury, 26 May 1918





This photograph is annotated as follows:

The historic meeting of old friends, before the great event.
Taken at Sutton Veny Camp just before they left for France.
Heytesbury 26/5/18


http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/5369140520/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

U.K. Military Executions 1914 - 1918

Surname - Initials - Date - Age - Offence - Unit - Regiment - Division - Division Type - Soldier Type - Rank

Richmond, M. R, 26/05/1918, 22, Desertion, 1/6 Gordons, 285031, 51, T, Kitchener, Pte
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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2011 20:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Private James Edward Prevost



Aldershot Military Cemetery, Hampshire.

Name: PREVOST, JAMES EDWARD
Initials: J E
Nationality: Canadian
Enlisted: Sudbury, Ontario 22/09/1917
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment)
Unit Text: 8th (Reserve) Bn.
Age: 20
Date of Death: 26/05/1918
Service No: 2529440
Additional Information: Born Eganville, Ontario 31/07/1897. Occupation - brakeman.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: V. C9.
Cemetery: ALDERSHOT MILITARY CEMETERY

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33894481@N04/5307655616/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mei 2011 8:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ado heeft met 5-1 gewonnen van FC Groningen
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