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4 April
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 9:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

VLADIMIR PETRUSHEVSKY - AN ARCHIVE

Vladimir A. Petrushevsky (1891-1961) was a Hussar (light cavalry) for the Russian Tsar during World War I, a colonel for the Kolchak Army during Russia’s Civil War, a poet, a talented sketch artist, and—most notably—the first Russian volcanologist. Yet, Petrushevsky never stepped foot on a Russian volcano and he was also essentially unknown to the Soviet history of science. This was because in 1920 he emigrated from his native Russia as a White Army (anti-Bolshevik) officer, never to return.

http://blogs.dickinson.edu/vapetrushevsky/

April 4th, 1917 - Деревня Горки.
Здесь землянки гусарского и уланского дивизионов. У меня в 11-ом эскадроне 27 человек старых гусар и из них 20 человек из бывшего 6-ого эскадрона. Пока весь дивизион под моей командой. Моя землянка полна воды, как колодец. Я заявил гусарам, что буду служить по старому, и, если надо, буду их цукать. Все на это согласны.

English translation to be posted.

Daar wachten we dan maar op... http://blogs.dickinson.edu/vapetrushevsky/april-4th-1917/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 9:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A Project of the Wyoming State Historical Society: April 4, 1916

April 4, 1916: Bill Carlisle robs passengers on the Union Pacific Overland Limited between Laramie and Cheyenne, Wyo.

https://www.wyohistory.org/this-date-in-history/april-4-1916

Bill Carlisle, Gentleman Bandit
Lori Van Pelt - November 8, 2014

The story reads like a dime novel: A white-masked train robber succeeds in acquiring “donations” from Union Pacific passengers and, despite a massive manhunt, eludes capture. He robs again. After being caught, he escapes from prison, holds up another train, and is returned to the penitentiary. There, he meets a priest who helps him repent. The robber earns parole, marries, operates a restaurant, and writes a book about his experiences.

But this tale is not fiction. Bill Carlisle and the great rewards offered by the Union Pacific Railroad for his capture “dead or alive” were real. He committed three robberies in 1916 and a fourth in 1919 after his escape from the Wyoming State Penitentiary.

Carlisle, the youngest of five children, was born May 4, 1890, when his father, a carpenter and Civil War veteran, was 60 years old. His mother, twenty-three years younger, died nine months after Bill was born. Because their father was in ill health, the children stayed with relatives or in orphanages. Bill stayed at an orphanage in York, Penn., his mother’s hometown.

Following a brief circus stint in 1905, Carlisle eventually drifted to Denver, Colo., where, in late 1915, he purchased an imitation glass gun that he planned to fill with candy and send to a niece for a Christmas gift. With little money left, he tried to find work in the city to no avail, so he headed to Cheyenne, Wyo. His luck was no better there, and he “rode the ‘rods’” of trains, traveling west.

With only a nickel in his pocket and no job prospects, he decided a train robbery would fetch him enough money to survive through spring. In addition to the toy pistol, he carried a .32-caliber handgun.

“You couldn’t starve to death in Wyoming if you had a gun with which to shoot game,” he wrote later.

On February 9, 1916, Carlisle concealed himself between two train cars and then swung onto the rear of the Portland Rose, as it pulled away from the Green River, Wyo., station. During the holdup, which the brakeman thought was a joke until the robber fired a shot through the top of an upper berth, Carlisle returned the porter’s coins to make up for his lost tips and gave a silver dollar to a man to pay for his breakfast. He bowed to a woman who tried to get his gun. No one was injured. Carlisle, whose face was hidden under a white bandanna, leapt from the train about three miles from Rock Springs, Wyo. He landed and rolled near the moving wheels, so close that his glass gun shattered against the rails.

The gain from the robbery was only $52.35, but news of the “White Masked Bandit” spread quickly. The crime was the first of its type to occur in sixteen years.

The Union Pacific Railroad offered a $1,500 reward. A posse followed a wrong trail, and Carlisle eluded capture. He returned to Green River to buy a ticket to Wheatland, Wyo.

One of the men of the posse, Charley Irwin, at that time special agent for the Union Pacific, and who later became known for providing broncos for Cheyenne Frontier Days, stood near the window, visiting with the ticket agent and another man. The ticket agent told Irwin that a customer was behind him. Carlisle, nervous because he recognized Irwin, purchased his ticket and turned to leave. Irwin placed a hand on his shoulder. Carlisle looked back, fearing the worst. Irwin said, “You forgot your change.”

By early April, Carlisle was back in Cheyenne, determined to go to Alaska. He needed money, so he robbed the Overland Limited between Cheyenne and Laramie on April 4, 1916, receiving $506.07. The U. P. reward increased by $5,000, enough that even homesteaders, who knew that a $6,500 reward could pay their mortgages, joined the search.

Law enforcement officials, overwhelmed by the number of telegrams and tips received, overlooked a legitimate message from a person who saw Carlisle in the vicinity of the Cheyenne robbery. Meanwhile, Carlisle made his way to Douglas, Wyo. He joined a saloon card game, got lucky and doubled his money. He then traveled by train to Casper, Wyo.

Upon learning other men were landing in jail for his crimes, Carlisle sent a letter to the Denver Post, enclosing a watch chain snatched during one of the holdups. He signed the letter, “The White Masked Bandit,” stating he would rob another train somewhere west of Laramie so the unjustly accused men could be set free.

The bandit struck again on April 21, 1916. He gave the train’s guard the watch matching the chain that was earlier sent to the Denver newspaper. When he jumped from the train, about four miles east of Walcott, Wyo., $378.50 richer, he injured his right ankle and bruised his face.

Saratoga, Wyo., native E. W. Walck, Sr. recalls his mother, Edna Walck, telling him she remembered the day the transcontinental train stopped at Walcott, a very unusual circumstance. Edna taught school for a short time at Walcott when she was nineteen. She boarded at the small hotel located there. There were two regular trains at that time. The Portland Rose carried local passengers from Cheyenne to Rawlins and Rock Springs, and the San Francisco Limited traveled cross-country. Westbound, the Limited stopped at Walcott so news of the robbery could be telegraphed ahead.

Another posse was put together and this time, it succeeded. Carlisle was caught the next day about 12 miles north of Walcott. Carbon County Sheriff Rubie Rivera of Rawlins, Wyo., took the robber into custody. The reward was split between Rivera, who took $500, and the members of the posse. In his memoirs, Rivera said he dreaded other criminals more because Carlisle was “more like a kid showing off.” Passengers on the train were able to identify the bandit. On May 10, 1916, after a two-day jury trial, Carlisle was sentenced to life in prison.

In July 1919, his sentence was reduced to 50 years, but Carlisle wanted out. He escaped from the Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins in November 1919 by hiding in a carton containing shirts made by the prisoners. On Nov. 19, 1919, he robbed a train near Rock River, Wyo. The passengers were mostly soldiers and sailors returning after World War I from military duty in France. Carlisle let them keep their money, saying, “I would have been over there with you had they let me go.”

He collected $86.40 from the others. When a young man aimed his gun at Carlisle, the bandit knocked it away. The gun discharged, injuring Carlisle’s hand.

Two weeks later, he was captured in a prospector’s cabin near Douglas where he was shot in the chest. Thirty-three days later, following surgery in Douglas, Carlisle was incarcerated again in Rawlins. Because the Union Pacific had spent about $15,000 hunting Carlisle in 1916, the company, this time, relied on the state to conduct the search.

Carlisle was imprisoned in Rawlins for 16 more years. While there, he met Reverend Gerard Schellinger, a local Catholic priest who helped the bandit go straight. Carlisle earned parole and was released on Jan. 8, 1936. Carlisle spent his first evening as a free man by eating dinner “with my best friend, Father Schellinger.”

Carlisle opened a cigar shop and newsstand in Kemmerer, Wyo., where Schellinger was posted. While recuperating from a ruptured appendix, Carlisle met Lillian Berquist, the superintendent of the local nursing home. They married on Dec. 23, 1936. Abandoning the cigar store, Carlisle moved to Laramie and worked at a filling station in Laramie for about a year. In 1937, the Saratoga Sun reported Carlisle leased Spring Creek Camp east of Laramie, planning to open “a lunchroom and a filling station” there.

E. W. Walck, Sr. recalls eating in the second story loft of Carlisle’s café as a college student in the 1940s in Laramie. Customers paid extra to take their meals upstairs. This building, Walck says, is located on Grand Avenue near 30th Street and currently houses a floral shop.

Kenneth Ostlind of Lewistown, Mont. and his friend Ottmar Grose worked briefly mopping and cleaning up at Carlisle’s establishment when they were University of Wyoming students in 1947-’48. Carlisle was generous enough to tell the young men to cook themselves a meal in his absence. But after he learned they’d helped themselves to the steaks in the cooler, Ostlind remembers, the old bandit fired them.

Some Carbon County residents also remember attending Carlisle’s book signings. The reformed robber’s autobiography was published in 1946. He dedicated the book to his sister, his wife, and to Schellinger, “friend of the later years, who taught me that often in failure there lies great success.”

Carlisle sold his Laramie business in 1956. After his wife died in 1962, he moved to Coatesville, Penn., where he lived with his niece. He died of cancer on June 19, 1964.

In June 2012, a Denver auction house sold an Iver Johnson .32-caliber revolver reportedly owned by Bill Carlisle and confiscated after the 1919 train robbery. In the same auction lot were several other items from the collection of George Carroll, who served as a U.S. marshal and as sheriff of Laramie County, Wyo. in the 1920s and 1930s.

Items sold at auction with the pistol included the original telegram warning trains to “keep a close lookout” because the No. 19 had been robbed near Medicine Bow, a poster offering a $1,000 reward for the bandit, a photo of Carroll and Carlisle, signed by both and taken in the mid-1950s, and an autographed, first-edition copy of Carlisle’s autobiography. The lot sold for $10,030 including the buyer’s premium.

https://www.wyohistory.org/encyclopedia/bill-carlisle
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 9:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Harvard Crimson - Ricardo Prize Exam. Will be Held in Upper Dane Tomorrow - April 4, 1916

The Ricardo Prize Scholarship examination will be held in Upper Dane Hall tomorrow at 2 o'clock. The scholarship is valued at $350, and is open to anyone who is this year a member of the University, and who will next year be either 8 member of the Senior class or of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Each candidate will write in the examination room an essay on a topic chosen by himself from a list not previously announced, in economics and political science. In addition, statements of previous studies, and any written work, must be submitted by every candidate to the Chairman of the Department of Economics not later than the time of the examination. The man who wins the scholarship must devote the majority of his time next year to economics and political studies.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1916/4/4/ricardo-prize-exam-will-be-held/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 10:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die Aktion, vol. 4, no. 14 - April 4, 1914

In 1911 Franz Pfemfert, a cantankerous critic of capitalism and Wilhelmine society, founded Die Aktion as a political and literary journal. In April of the following year, a new subtitle declared the journal a "weekly for politics, literature, and art." Although politics remained the priority, Die Aktion began featuring visual art coverage as well as original prints and illustrations.

Artist Max Oppenheimer (MOPP) worked closely with Die Aktion in its early years, portraying in its pages many of the young writers who gave the journal its distinctive voice. Egon Schiele made his first woodcuts at Pfemfert's urging in 1916, for publication in the journal. Other frequent contributors included Ludwig Meidner and, later, Conrad Felixmüller and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff.

Adamantly opposed to World War I, Pfemfert skirted tightened censorship from August 1914 to October 1918 by treating contemporary events only through artistic and literary allusions. At a time when reading books by foreign authors was considered unpatriotic, he dedicated entire issues of Die Aktion to Russian, French, and Belgian authors and artists. In late 1918, however, Pfemfert resumed vocal political critique, siding with the radical left. His selection of prints, formerly varied, became overtly political. After 1921, he ceased art coverage altogether, decreased the number of issues, and used the publication exclusively as a mouthpiece for his own increasingly partisan views.

https://www.moma.org/s/ge/collection_ge/object/object_objid-144321.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 04 Apr 2018 10:14, in toaal 2 keer bewerkt
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 10:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from the President, Woodrow Wilson — to the Secretary of Labor, W.B. Wilson

April 4, 1916

My dear Mr. Secretary:

I am very much complimented and pleased that you should have sent me a copy of your verses. I shall look forward with the greatest pleasure to reading them, and no small part of that pleasure will be that I am included in the limited circle of friends to whom you refer to in your preface.
Cordially and sincerely yours,

Woodrow Wilson

https://www.dol.gov/100/wilsonbook/page12.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 10:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

First World War Veterans of Guysborough County

The year 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the First World War. This blog contains stories of the war's Guysborough County military personnel, along with background information related to their service. In November 2015, I published the stories of 72 Guysborough County veterans who died from 1915 to 1917. In November 2017, I published a second volume, containing the stories of 64 individuals who died from 1918 to 1937. Both volumes are available for purchase online at bantrypublishing.ca .

Guysborough County CEF Enlistments - April 4, 1916

Eight Guysborough County natives and one resident enlisted with CEF units on April 4, 1916:

Bright, James Kendall: Born June 19, 1894 at Country Harbour, son of John William & Margaret Olive (Fenton) Bright.
Enlistment: 193rd Battalion at Guysborough. Transferred to 42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada) on December 5, 1916. Shrapnel wound (leg) on April 9. 1917 at Vimy Ridge, France. Rejoined 42nd in France on November 21, 1917. Gassed at Cambrai (September 29, 1918), returned to unit on October 10, 1918. Discharged at Halifax on April 13, 1919.
Post-war: Returned to Sherbrooke, marrying Mary Viola Jordan and raising a family of four children (two boys and two girls). Served in Veterans’ Guard during the Second World War. Employed as Sherbrooke post office caretaker. Passed away at Camp Hill Hospital, Halifax on January 9, 1970 and laid to rest in St. James Anglican Cemetery, Sherbrooke.

Lees beslist verder op http://guysboroughgreatwarveterans.blogspot.nl/2016/04/guysborough-county-cef-enlistments.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 10:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

April 4th 1915 - Letter from Juliet Sladden to her sister, May Sladden

Seward House
Badsey
Evesham

Sunday April 4th 1915

My dear May

Thanks awfully for your nice letter. I feel rather a little wretch not writing to you for Easter, but oh we have been so busy that I really hadn’t a minute. On Saturday morning about half past ten we got a wire from Boo to say that he and Mela were coming after all, Boo in time for lunch to stay till Tuesday night, and Mela in the evening to stay till Monday night. Of course we were delighted, but it meant rather a scramble nevertheless. You poor thing, I am sorry you have missed him especially as it seemed so certain on Thursday that he was not coming; I expect you feel about as sick as I did at not seeing Arthur – the fates were unkind! Well as you have so unfortunately missed him you may just as well stay over next Sunday as Aunt Lizzie suggested, and be sure I can get along quite easily – with only Father and me in the house there will be very little to do and Queenie gets along with me very well. Of course if I went and developed a bad cold or something equally silly I should have to send along and ask you to come back and rescue us, but I don’t think that is very likely. I have had a slight suppressed cold for the last two or three days, which I have kept off with oil of lavender and strength of will! I certainly don’t intend to have another cold yet.

Yes, Father did give Det your message about the cheque.

It is very jolly having Cyril and Mela here for Easter and we are spending quite a happy time. We four and Queenie went to the eight o’clock celebration this morning. Queenie got up of course before and did some of the work. We got breakfast at 9.15 which wasn’t bad considering, don’t you think? The locum is quite a nice man; he was very quick over the early services as he only reads half the sentences for most people and the whole sentence for the last person of the row: we were out by a quarter to nine. Ethel of course had Sunday school, so I had the housework to do. I took up Mother’s breakfast, cleared the table, made her bed and gave a lick to the bedrooms and the drawing room, and put out the table-cloth and dinner napkins for Queenie, and that was all I had time to do before church, so the lamps had to wait until after as usual! Poor lamps! Ethel has a theory that however much has to be done we can squeeze it all in somehow in the appointed time – except the lamps, and they always have “to be done afterwards”.

I quite agree with you – the daily round and common task do swamp everything else sometimes to an almost unbearable degree at home. I know that Cyril has felt it at times very strongly. And I don’t mind confessing that it was so bad last holidays that I was quite thankful to go back to school. We must quench it somehow; anyway it has been better this hols: and the last few days I haven’t noticed it at all. Probably the result of only one slavey – calm after tempest you know! And Queenie is rather pleased with herself at having the whole show to herself – it won’t last long but it is pleasant while it does. She needs similar spurs frequently to keep her at all up to the mark, doesn’t she?

Ypers is a great acquisition in the household, I think. He keeps us all lively.

Mela is looking a little tired and pale after her hard work; I think she is glad to get on to some new work. Isn’t it splendid the matron told her just as she came over here that if she chooses she can go on to the Bournbrooke Military Hospital. I think Mela has got on the right side of matron! She will get paid there, £20 a year, and the hours are shorter she thinks.

Strictly between you and me I shan’t be sorry when Thursday comes as I am looking forward to a quiet time then even though I shall have all the work to do alone with Queenie. Ethel is such a very strenuous person I find I can’t keep up with her perpetual motion system. I don’t mind working like a gallows slave in the morning and doing a few odd things afterwards, but she continually runs after me all the evening with, “Just come and help me for a minute, Betty, I wanted to do one or two little odd jobs, it won’t take more than a minute or two.” But it really takes an hour or two. After my accustomed work of sitting for some hours every day, I get a bit fed up with trotting round all the time. And I wouldn’t grumble if I thought it was really necessary but I don’t think it is personally!

Hope you will have a good rest at Eastbourne and come back quite refreshed. I must go and get ready for church now. (I don’t really want to go very much but Ethel wants me to come along with her, so I must leave my multitude of letters and the Swinburne poems I’m dying to read until another day, for the Bowdens are coming in to supper and you know how much reading and writing one does when Mrs Bowden is about! Besides, it is rude not to entertain.)

Love from your affectionate
Betty

http://www.badseysociety.uk/sladden-archive/letters/jes19150404
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 10:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

April 4, 1914, "WENDELL JAMES TO SHOW BRITISHERS HE CAN BEST THEIR CHAMPION"

On this day in sports 100 years ago, The Ogden Standard reported that Wendell James, who won the 220-yard high and low hurdles for Wesleyan, was contemplating a trip to England so that he could best the "Britishers," who apparently had someone who runs that exact distance while jumping over hurdles of varying heights. I'm not sure when the 220-yard high and low hurdles faded from relevance, but I think we can all agree that it was probably hilarious to watch.

https://www.si.com/extra-mustard/2014/04/04/this-day-in-sports-100-years-ago-2
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Apr 2018 10:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A Journey Through Charlie Chaplin's Movies from 1914 to 1967: The Star Boarder (4 April 1914)

Story: Living in a boarding house, the Tramp takes the fancy of the landlady, much to the annoyance of her family and the other boarders.

Production: Gordon Griffith, who plays the camera-mad kid in this short, was one of the first successful child actors in American cinema. He not only made the switch from child star to adult actor, but also navigated the change from silent cinema to the talkies and, indeed, from appearing before the camera to working behind-the-scenes. As well as starring here with Chaplin (and in other later shorts, as well as an appearance in Tillie’s Punctured Romance), he’d go on to be the first actor to portray the character of Tarzan (as a child, in a 1918 film) and he played Tom Sawyer (in Huckleberry Finn, 1920). He worked as an assistant director in the 1930s and 1940s as the screen roles dried up, then became a producer through to the mid-1950s. His sparky and sly youngster is the catalyst for the drama in The Star Boarder as his ‘picture show’ at the short’s climax feeds the confusion of those watching—he’s the first of Chaplin’s child co-stars, a trend that would culminate in The Kid (1921) with Jackie Coogan.

Edgar Kennedy (who also features in Tillie’s Punctured Romance) is the husband who fears that Chaplin’s lodger is usurping him in his wife’s affections. Like Ford Sterling before him, at this stage Kennedy is firmly wedded to the over-emoting Victorian school of acting that permeated much of early silent cinema. The eccentric moustache he sports only helps to exaggerate his features and grimaces, and he has great fun emoting away and over-signalling his feelings and intentions. Kennedy started as one of the original Keystone Kops and would later go on to star opposite the likes of Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers, making his mark in a series of classic sound films and becoming well-known for his patented ‘slow burn’ reaction to the antics of the clowns he featured beside, as well as for directing a series of two-reel comedies for Hal Roach.

Chaplin has great fun here playing the boarder—who is dressed as the Tramp figure, but doesn’t act the same way—who can lord it over the rest due to the attentions of their landlady (Minta Durfee), often pulling faces at others when they fail to get their way or capture her attention. Chaplin once again displays the fleet-of-foot physicality that marked him out from so many of the other screen clowns of this period: the little dance he does when left alone in the pantry and goes looking for something to eat (or rather, drink) is a delightful moment. That’s followed by another outing for his ever-graceful drunk act. His face conveys everything we need to know about his discomfort when he has to sit upon the stolen pie in order to hide it (and the two bottles of beer) from a visiting friend of the landlady.

For the first time perhaps we see Chaplin playing the most sympathetic role in the picture: gone is the violent tough that the early Tramp appeared to be. Out of everyone in this boarding house, he’s perhaps the least objectionable (even if he helps himself to all the beer and pie he can carry). It’s a trait that future films would build upon and develop, turning the Chaplin character into someone the film audience would root for (in his next short, Mabel at the Wheel, Chaplin would—in dramatic contrast—play the villain). Although directed by Nichols (seemingly with some input from Sennett), this is a slower paced, less frenetic Keystone short and more room is given over to character development by Chaplin, suggesting he was having an effect on his films even when he wasn’t in full control (a state of affairs that’s only a few films off).

Slapstick: The tennis match affords much opportunity for falling over while swinging the racket and failing to hit any balls. A fall from a ladder sees the landlady and the boarder caught by the boy with the camera in yet another compromising situation, if viewed from the ‘right’ angle. Naturally everything ends in the usual Keystone rumble, but Chaplin manages to effectively separate himself and enjoys a personal struggle with the sheet that made up the screen. Finally, a one-on-one tussle with Edgar Kennedy brings the whole thing to an exhausting close.

Verdict: Growing in confidence, Chaplin is beginning to display many of the attributes that would make him the figure we know today, 3/5

Lees én kíjk verder op https://chaplinfilmbyfilm.wordpress.com/2014/04/04/the-star-boarder-4-april-1914/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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