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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 8:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HANSARD → 27 March 1917 → Commons Sitting → PRISONERS OF WAR.

BRITISH IN TURKEY.

Mr. PETO asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether parcels for prisoners of war in Turkey are now-stopped; if so, whether he can state the reason or reasons for this; whether the interned crews of the merchant ships "Assiout" and "City of Khios" are included; and whether he is taking any steps in the matter?

Mr. JAMES HOPE (Lord of the Treasury) Notice has been received from the Swiss Post Office that the transmission through Austria-Hungary of parcels for prisoners of war in Turkey has been stopped until further notice. His Majesty's Government are not aware of the reasons for this stoppage, which affects the prisoners mentioned by the hon. Member as well as all others, and they have requested that the United States Ambassador at Vienna may enter a strong protest against it.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1917/mar/27/british-in-turkey
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 9:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GEORGE EDWARD HILLING (1883 – 27 March 1917)

George Edward Hilling was born in 1883 in Winchester, the second son of George Hilling, a butler, and his wife, Agnes. George Snr, had previously been in service at Poringland House in Norfolk. He and Agnes had six children. The two eldest, William Thomas (born 1881) and George Edward were born in Weeke. Then, after they had moved to Langford, came three girls, Emily (1885), Agnes (1888) and Elsie (1890), and finally another son, Walter Henry (1892). The family lived at 1, Blackmoor before moving to Victoria Jubilee Memorial Cottages, Langford. George Senior was still employed as a butler.

In 1901, George Edward, aged 17, was working as a grocer’s porter. However, by 1911, he was a police constable living in lodgings in Fishponds, Bristol. There, he married Rose Clark and they had a son whom George never saw.

George Edward was Gunner 291727 and was serving in France with the 129th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery when he was killed in action on 27th March 1917. He was 34. He is buried at the Ecoivres Military cemetery at Mont-St.Eloi (IV.H.8), Pas de Calais, France. This cemetery is 8 kilometres north west of Arras and contains 1,728 Commonwealth, 786 French and 4 German war graves.

The following appeared in the Weston Mercury & Somersetshire Herald on 14th April 1917:-

“LANGFORD HERO KILLED IN ACTION

We deeply regret to announce the death of Private George Hilling, second son of Mr and Mrs G. Hilling of Langford, who was killed in action on the 26th ult. Gunner Hilling was born and brought up in Langford and attended Churchill School, where his portrait hangs with those of many other old boys who are fighting in honour’s cause, and some of whom, alas, will never return. The dead hero, whose two brothers are both serving at the Front, was for 12 years in the Bristol Police Force. He joined the Bristol Heavy Battery of Artillery, and was drafted to France a year ago. There is added pathos in the fact that he had not seen the little son who was born during his absence, and, needless to say, heartfelt sympathy is entertained with Mr and Mrs Hilling, who are much respected in the village, and with the young widow and child. Private Hilling was a fine man both physically and in personal attributes, and the following letters bear eloquent testimony to his heroism and bravery:

-th Heavy Battery

H.E.F.

March 26th 1917

Dear Mrs Hilling, – I am very grieved to tell you that your husband, Gunner G.E. Hilling, was killed in action this afternoon. He died in a noble endeavour to procure water for his fellow gunners. His death has robbed us of one of the best gunners of the battery. He was always cheery, even in the most trying conditions. You will be glad to know that he suffered no pain, being killed instantaneously. He left a will in his pay book, which has been forwarded to the base, leaving £11 his property and effects to you, his wife. Please let me know if there is anything I can do for you as I was his section officer.

Yours sincerely

A.M.Jones


The following letter is from his brother William:

Dear Father and Mother, – It is with deep regret, I have to write and tell you of poor George’s death. He was killed by a German shell and died instantly, so one good thing poor George knew nothing of it. Frank and I have been up to the cemetery today, and we are going to the funeral tomorrow, the 28th. It is a hard task for me to write and tell you this news. I shall miss him more than I can say. He was just the same here as he was at home. I have written to poor Rose. I will write more next time. Frank wishes to be remembered to you all.

From your loving son,

Bill


So died a brave soldier and British Gentleman”.

http://langfordhistory.com/lhg/2015/09/17/george-edward-hilling-1883-27-march-1917/
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 9:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Death of a soldier: 27 March 1918.

Ninety seven years ago today (...) Eric Andrew GRAY was killed in action during World War I.

I’ve recently written a couple of posts about Eric Gray, prompted in part by being sent a letter he wrote in 1917 after the Battle of Messines. You can read the letter here, and what I’ve learned of his military service here.

I originally began researching Eric Gray’s life on behalf of my father in law. He had talked often of his uncle who had, he believed, “died at Ypres.” When I obtained a copy of Eric’s service record from Archives New Zealand, I found that although he had fought and been wounded at Messines (considered the beginning of the Second Battle of Ypres), he actually died in the Somme valley. (...)

Eric Gray’s death is recorded on the first page of his service record. Details are shown below. The first line of text says:

Killed in action March 27th 1818. This is dated 8.4.18

1818? Lees verder op https://suzysu.wordpress.com/2015/03/27/death-of-a-soldier-27-march-1918/
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Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 27 Mrt 2018 9:20, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 9:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sharpe, Charles E., Letter, 27 March 1918

Transcript:
I hope you will write and let me know if you receive this short letter. I will be looking for one.
We are having some cooler Weather, just now we have been having some nice Summer weather but [it] has changed a little now.
I think I must now bring this to a close by thanking you again for your kindness.
I remain yours sincerely
Charles E. Sharpe.
No. 663758
8th C.M.G.C.
B.E.F.
France.

http://digitalcollections.mcmaster.ca/pw20c/sharpe-charles-e-letter-27-march-1918-0
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 9:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dever, John Melody Letter: 1918 March 27th

SPECIAL ORDER
By Lieut - General Sir Arthur Currie K.C.B., K.C.M.C.
COMMANDING CANADIAN TROOPS

27th March 1918

In an endeavor to reach an immediate decision the enemy had gathered all his forces and struck a mighty blow at the British Army. Overwhelmed by sheer weight of numbers the British Division is the line between the SCARPE and the OISE have fallen back fighting hard, steady, and [?]
Measures have been taken successfully to meet this German onslaught. The French have gathered a powerful Army, commanded by a most able and trusted leader and this Army is now moving swiftly to our help. Fresh British Divisions are being thrown in. The Canadians are soon to be engaged. Our Motor Machine Gun Brigade have already played a most gallant part and once again covered itself with glory.
Looking back with pride on the unbroken record of your glorious achievements, asking you to realize that to day the fate of the British Empire hangs in the balance, I place my trust in the Canadian Corps, knowing that where Canadians are engaged there can be no given way.
Under the orders of you devoted officers in the coming battle you will advance or fall where you stand facing the enemy.
To those who will fall I say "You will not die but step into immortality. Your mothers will not lament you fate but will be proud to have borne such sons. Your names will be revered for ever and ever by your grateful country and God will take you onto himself."
Canadian's, in this fateful hour, I command you and I trust you to fight as you have ever fought, with all your strength, with all your determination, with all you tranquil courage. On many a hard fought field of battle you have overcome the enemy. With God's help you shall achieve victory once more.

A.W. CURRIE, Lieut-General
Commanding Canadian Corps

http://www.canadianletters.ca/content/document-10203
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 9:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sheffield Independent - 27 March 1919

Report in the Sheffield Independent 27 March 1919 finally confirming Lord Grosvenor's death:

"OCTOBER '14 TO MARCH '19 - Lady Hugh Grosvenor whose husband's death is now officially concluded to have taken place in October 1914, when he was listed as 'missing' along with her brother, Lord Crichton, had long ago abandoned all hope of his being alive. In October 1917, as nothing had been heard of him, Lady Hugh after three years of anxiety, was reluctantly compelled to believe he was no more. She then resigned his prospective candidature for Macclesfield. He was the Duke of Westminster's step-uncle."

http://thegreatwar.whitchurch-shropshire.co.uk/sheffield-independent-27-march-1919/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 12:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Boat Race 1920

The 72nd Boat Race took place on 27 March 1920. Generally held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. As a result of the First World War, this was the first race for six years: Oxford went into the race as reigning champions, having won the previous race held in 1914. Both universities had participated in various Peace Regattas in 1919. In this year's race, umpired by former rower Frederick I. Pitman, Cambridge won by four lengths in a time of 21 minutes 11 seconds. The victory took the overall record to 39–32 in Oxford's favour. (...)

The First World War caused a six-year hiatus in the event: during the conflict, at least 42 Oxbridge Blues were killed, including four of the previous race's Cambridge crew and one from the Oxford boat. No race was arranged for 1919, but the crews participated in the Peace Regatta at the Henley Royal Regatta that year. Taking part in the King's Cup, Cambridge were defeated by the Australian Army crew in the semi-final, the latter going on to defeat Oxford in the final. The Light Blues also took part in the Inter Allied Peace Regatta in Paris the same year, victorious in the final against New Zealand and Australia crews. (...)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boat_Race_1920
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 12:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

South Russian Government

The South Russian Government (...) was a Russian White movement government established by Armed Forces of South Russia commander Anton Denikin in Novorossiysk, Kuban, in March 1920 during the Russian Civil War.

On 27 March 1920, Denikin was forced to evacuate Novorossiysk for Crimea, which the Whites had controlled since June 1919. However, the slipshod retreat discredited Denikin and he stepped down, succeeded by General Pyotr Wrangel, who was elected new Commander-in-Chief of the White Army by military council. The South Russian Government was dissolved on 30 March in Feodosiya. Wrangel set up a new Government of South Russia in Sevastopol in April.

This attempted establishment of civil government by the White authorities was a recognition that previous neglect of civil administration by the General Command of the Armed Forces of South Russia had cost the Whites civilian support.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Russian_Government
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2018 12:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Manifeste Cannibale Dada - by Francis Picabia - 27th March 1920

You are all indicted, stand up! It is impossible to talk to you unless you are standing up.
Stand up as you would for the Marseillaise or God Save the King.

Stand up, as if the Flag were before you. Or as if you were in the presence of Dada, which signifies Life, and which accuses you of loving everything out of snobbery if only it is expensive enough.

One dies a hero's death or an idiot's death - which comes to the same thing. The only word that has more than a day-to-day value is the word Death. You love death - the death of others.

Kill them! Let them die! Only money does not die; it only goes away for a little while.

That is God! That is someone to respect: someone you can take seriously! Money is the prie-Dieu of entire families. Money for ever! Long live money! The man who has money is a man of honour.

Honour can be bought and sold like the arse. The arse, the arse, represents life like potato-chips, and all you who are serious-minded will smell worse than cow's shit.

Dada alone does not smell: it is nothing, nothing, nothing.
It is like your hopes: nothing
like your paradise: nothing
like your idols: nothing
like your heroes: nothing
like your artists: nothing
like your religions: nothing.

Hiss, shout, kick my teeth in, so what? I shall still tell you that you are half-wits. In three months my friends and I will be selling you our pictures for a few francs.


Wacht... wát? http://391.org/manifestos/1920-manifeste-cannibale-dada-francis-picabia.html#.WroxYohubIU
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Mrt 2019 8:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Margaret Duncan’s diary: 26-27 March 1918
by Nicky Sugar, Archivist at Bristol Archives

In February 1918 Margaret Duncan, a Post Office clerk from Scotland, sailed to East Africa for a new job and new adventures. Her diary and photograph albums are now in the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection at Bristol Archives (ref: 2001/090/2). One hundred years on, we share her story for the first time.

Last month Margaret docked in Dar es Salaam, the captured former capital of German East Africa and still home to many Germans at that point. In this instalment she continues to explore the city, “ever so happy” in the company of Sergeant Jim White…

My diary - Dar es Salaam - Tuesday 26 March 1918
We still lie in harbour at Dar es Salaam, I don’t mind how long we stay. Sunday morning brought Sergt White aboard again, Sunday afternoon Sparks and Eleanor went to church ashore and “Jim” and I had a Rickshaw ride round and through the prohibited area, along the seashore and close to the wrecked “Konig” which the Germans sank in the Channel with the intention of blocking it. I took a photo of it and Jim took one of me sitting in the Rickshaw, the photos of this tour should prove both interesting and amusing if they turn out. We have a borrowed camera, mine still in the hold.

Yesterday morning I had two visitors, Sapper Harry Potts came aboard first and soon Jim joined us here and we formed a jolly little circle on deck. Potts has been speaking on the Nairobi wire, and they wonder why we are already eight days overdue! Life on a Coasting Steamer is great, half of our time is put off lying in harbour, and trips ashore are absolutely topping.

Margaret Duncan enjoying the picnic she shared with Jim, the bottle of raspberry drink visible in the pictureWe had a delightful little picnic yesterday afternoon, our two selves. Jim had got fruit and cakes and an obliging Greek shopkeeper put Raspberry drink in a bottle for us, so off we set in a Rickshaw to a lovely palm grove on the outskirts of the town. Possibly some day this spot will form part of a delightful public park, there will be a prom and golf course, and this tropical port will become a holiday resort.

Meantime there are houses around that part which are still occupied by German women, the German children are wheeled out by black nurses in things that are [more] like toy carts than prambulators. We get looks of hatred from the women, they have no love for our Soldiers nor their friends. We enjoyed our little picnic just like a pair of school children, we were so happy. Our plates and cups were Captured ware from the Kaiserhof Hotel and were marked with the German Crown and the word “Kaiserhof”, Jim brought them from his quarters.

Group photograph of the staff of the Dar es Salaam Telegraph Office which Margaret Duncan visitedI had visited the Imperial Signal Headqrs on Sunday, the boys there are so envious of the lucky one who has a girl on board the Cluny and they made a great fuss over me, they tell me that I can’t realise what it really means to them to speak to a girl after all the months of Soldier life and the monotony of one another’s company day after day. They had got so badly out of the way of speaking to ladies that they felt awkward. However they were soon quite at ease with me, placed a chair in the centre of the office floor so that I could speak to them all at once and they could all see me well.

We spend the evenings after dinner on deck. Life in D.S.M. is very sweet!

Wednesday 27 March
Farewell to Dar es Salaam 10.30am and we are out of the bay. Days of dreamy delight; of glorious dawns, of palm trees towering up against skies of pink, orange, blue and grey; of calm blue waters and native barges drifting ever over them. Evenings of beauty, of moon and starlight, spent on deck, or drifting slowly up and across the creek. Such was last night, our last night together after four long days of close companionship. Only four days? But the four were in Dar es Salaam! Not prim and proper St Andrews. We were happy, ever so happy, can never forget the happy days at D.S.M. and we can recall them to one another with pleasure when we return to Scotland.

Yesterday afternoon we went for a walk through the purely native quarter of Dar-es-Salaam. We were greeted with their “Jambo”, their “Hullo” or equivalent greeting. I saw Harry Potts again, also some others, and the crowd on the veranda of the P.O. Bungalow waved and waved us an enthusiastic farewell as our boat moved off again to the Cluny. Dar es Salaam is occupied by Swahili tribes, I have started picking up a few words of their language, but some say I’ve got it with a Scottish accent. That comes of learning it from a Scottie!

We have now anchored outside Zanzibar, it looks nice, we came in before three, so the journey occupied less than five hours, Mombasa is looming near, and then Nairobi. We have taken a few photos on our borrowed camera.

Bekijk de foto's op https://www.bristolmuseums.org.uk/blog/margaret-duncans-diary-26-27-march-1918/
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