Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

17 Maart

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45653

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2006 6:50    Onderwerp: 17 Maart Reageer met quote

March 17

1917 Shakeup in French government

In the midst of Allied plans for a major spring offensive on the Western Front, the French government suffers a series of crises in its leadership, including the forced resignation, on March 17, 1917, of Prime Minister Aristide Briand.

Horrified by the brutal events at Verdun and the Somme in 1916, the French Chamber of Deputies had already met in secret to condemn the leadership of France’s senior military leader, Joseph Joffre, and engineer his dismissal. Prime Minister Briand oversaw Joffre’s replacement by Robert Nivelle, who believed an aggressive offensive along the River Aisne in central France was the key to a much-needed breakthrough on the Western Front. Building upon the tactics he had earlier employed in successful counter-attacks at Verdun, Nivelle believed he would achieve this breakthrough within two days; then, as he claimed, “the ground will be open to go where one wants, to the Belgian coast or to the capital, on the Meuse or on the Rhine.”

The principal power over French military strategy, however, had moved with Joffre’s departure to a ministerial war committee who answered not to the commander in chief, Nivelle, but to the minister of war, Louis Lyautey, a former colonial administrator in Morocco appointed by Briand in December 1916, around the same time as Joffre’s dismissal. Lyautey loudly and publicly derided the Nivelle scheme, insisting (correctly as it turned out) that it would meet with failure. He was not the only member of Briand’s cabinet who opposed the offensive, but the prime minister continued to support Nivelle, desperately needing a major French victory to restore confidence in his leadership. On March 14, Lyautey resigned. This embarrassing public disagreement with his ministers brought Briand down as well, forcing his resignation on March 17.

French President Raymond Poincare’s next choice for prime minister, Alexandre Ribot, appointed Paul Painleve as his minister of war. Also hesitant to fully support Nivelle’s plan, Painleve and the rest of the Ribot government were finally pressured to do so by the need to counteract the German resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare (announced in February 1917) and by Nivelle’s threat that he would resign if the offensive did not proceed as planned. The so-called Nivelle Offensive, begun on April 16, 1917, was a disaster: the German positions along the Aisne, built up since the fall of 1914, proved to be too much for the Allies. Almost all the French tanks, introduced into battle for the first time, had been destroyed or had become bogged down by the end of the first day; within a week 96,000 soldiers had been wounded. The battle was called off on April 20, and Nivelle was replaced by the more cautious Philippe Petain five days later.
www.historychannel.com
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2006 7:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Events
None for 17 March

Births
1 1888 Pierre Wertheim
2 1896 Patrick Huskinson
3 1897 Francis Turner
4 1898 Thomas Elliott

Deaths
1 1917 Eric Pashley
2 1918 Maurice Scott
3 1918 Hans Bethge
4 1918 St. Cyprian Tayler
5 1963 Pierre Ducornet

Claims
1 1916 Maxime Lenoir #3
2 1917 Lancelot Richardson #7
3 1917 Reginald Malcolm #2
4 1917 John Malone #2 #3 #4
5 1917 Roy Chappell #2
6 1917 Cecil Clark #2
7 1917 Leonard Emsden #2 #3
8 1917 G.A. Hyde #1
9 1917 James Leith #6
10 1917 James Slater #2
11 1917 Sydney Smith #1
12 1917 Herbert Travers #2
13 1917 Charles Woollven #4
14 1917 Alexandre Bretillon #1
15 1917 René Doumer #6
16 1917 René Fonck #2
17 1917 Georges Guynemer #35
18 1917 Karl Allmenröder #3
19 1917 Hartmut Baldamus #14 #15
20 1917 Heinrich Gontermann #4
21 1917 Ludwig Hanstein #2
22 1917 Wilhelm Hippert #1
23 1917 Friedrich Mallinckrodt #3
24 1917 Manfred von Richthofen #27 #28
25 1917 Kurt Schneider #1
26 1917 Paul Strähle #3
27 1917 Werner Voss #16 #17
28 1917 Kurt Wolff #3
29 1917 Francis Casey #1
30 1917 Francis Kitto #1
31 1918 Franz Schleiff #9
32 1918 George Thomson #15 #16
33 1918 Charles Bissonette #1

Losses
1 1917 Eric Pashleykilled in flying accident
2 1918 W.N. Holmesshot down
3 1918 Alexander Roulstonewounded in action
4 1918 Maurice Scottkilled in flying accident
5 1918 Hans Bethgekilled in action
6 1918 Hans Müllershot down
7 1918 Werner Steinhäuserwounded in action
8 1918 St. Cyprian Taylerkilled in action; shot down by Jasta 24

http://www.theaerodrome.com/today/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 20:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ROYAL HUMANE SOCIETY BRONZE MEDALS CITATIONS TAKEN FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1914

O'Reilly, James. Corporal. Case 41000
On the 17th March 1914, Pte. Falkiner, Royal Munster Fusiliers, fell overboard from the R.I.M. SS Sladen into the Irrawady at Prome, Burma, the night being dark and the current strong. O'Reilly plunged in after him but failed to reach him before he sank.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~tamarnet/bronz14s.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 17 MARCH, 1915

28th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (Artists' Rifles); the undermentioned to te Second. Lieutenants. Dated 18th March, 1915: —
Serjeant Noel Elmslie.
Corporal William Goodwin Blake Shinner.
Private Thomas Harold Hughes.
Private Eric Jtilake Harvey.

The Kent Cyclist Battalion
Second Lieutenant Ronald F. Jenyns to be Lieutenant. Dated 23rd January, 1915.

The Huntingdonshire Cyclist Battalion.
Captain Joseph R. W. Myers to be Adjutant, vice Captain Francis W. M. Drew, who has vacated the appointment. Dated 18th March, 1915.
Allen Woodward Wilson to be Second Lieutenant. Dated llth March, 1915.

http://www.uridge.org/Documents/LondonGazette-Symondson.pdf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Allied-Turkish Forces - Beginning of the Dardanelles Campaign - March 1915

Forces Available to the British 17 March 1915

29th Division: (Gallipoli - April 1915)

86th Brigade
2/Royal Fusiliers
1/Lancashire Fusiliers
2/Royal Munster Fusiliers
1/Royal Dublin Fusiliers

87th Brigade
2/South Wales Borderers
1/King's Own Scottish Borderers
1/Royal Inniskilling
1/Borderers

88th Brigade
4/Worcester
2/Hantfordshire
1/Essex
5/Royal Scots

Mounted Troops:
C Sqn Surrey Yeomanry
Divisional Cyclist Company

XV Artillery Brigade, RHA:
B Battery, RHA (4-10pdr guns)
L Battery, RHA (4-10pdr guns)
Y Battery, RHA (4-10pdr guns)

Lees verder op http://www.cgsc.edu/CARL/nafziger/915DCAA.pdf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

BRITISH MERCHANT SHIPS LOST AT SEA DUE TO ENEMY ACTION

LEEUWARDEN, 990grt, 17 March 1915, 4 miles W by N ½ N from Maas LV, captured by submarine, sunk by gunfire

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1LossesBrMS1914-16.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

This Week In Military/Aviation History 15-21 March

17 March 1911 - The Curtiss D pusher-engined biplane with a tricycle landing gear is demonstrated to the United States Army. Later it becomes their Army Aeroplane No.2.

17 March 1917 - Zeppelin LZ86 (L39) is brought down over Compiegne in France by anti-aircraft fire.

http://www.warbirds-online.org/2010/03/14/this-week-in-militaryaviation-history-15-21-march/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1915: Four French Corporals, for cowardice

On this date in 1915, four French corporals were shot at a farm in Suippes for refusing to advance out of their trenches through the carnage of a World War I no man’s land.

It was not only Corporals Theophile Maupas, Louis Lefoulon, Louis Girard and Lucien Lechat who had refused. The entire 21st Company of the 336th Infantry regiment, exhausted and already decimated by combat, was ordered over the trench at dawn on March 10.

Under withering machine gun fire, and with French artillery carelessly dropping shells just in front of their own lines, the 21st stayed put. Frantic to force the advance, the French commander ordered artillery to drive the troops ahead by shelling his own trenches — an order the artillerists refused to carry out unless someone put it in writing.

In that slaughterhouse of trench warfare, insubordination in the ranks met stern reprisals. Generals with no strategy but to make mincemeat of their countrymen could not well abide the meat’s reluctance to be minced. Examples must be made, especially inasmuch as the impracticality of executing entire companies impressed even the brass.

On March 16, six corporals and 18 soldiers of the intransigent company faced military trial in the Suippes town hall; the four condemned were shot the next day and buried under dishonorable black crosses. (...)

A witness to a different French military execution discomfitingly describes the near-total dehumanization of the victims:

The two condemned were tied up from head to toe like sausages. A thick bandage hid their faces. And, a horrible thing, on their chests a square of fabric was placed over their hearts. The unfortunate duo could not move. They had to be carried like two dummies on the open-backed lorry, which bore them to the rifle range. It is impossible to articulate the sinister impression the sight of those two living parcels made on me.

The padre mumbled some words and then went off to eat. Two six-strong platoons appeared, lined up with their backs to the firing posts. The guns lay on the ground. When the condemned had been attached, the men of the platoon who had not been able to see events, responding to a silent gesture, picked up their guns, abruptly turned about, aimed and opened fire. Then they turned their backs on the bodies and the sergeant ordered “Quick march!”

The men marched right passed them, without inspecting their weapons, without turning a head. No military compliments, no parade, no music, no march past; a hideous death without drums or trumpets.


The shootings this day became emblematic of those lost and obscured legions. The circumstances of the “crime” — the senselessness of the advance, the order to bombard their own troops, the fury of the reprisal — recommended it to novelist Humphrey Cobb, and subsequently to a young Stanley Kubrick who adapted a fictionalized form to the 1957 film Paths of Glory.

Lees het hele artikel... http://www.executedtoday.com/2008/03/17/1915-french-corporals-maupas-lefoulon-girard-lechat/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

BRAND WHITLOCK LETTERS, 1915
Letters from Schoolchildren of Ghent, Belgium, March 1915


The German army invaded Belgium on August 3, 1914, and in three weeks controlled the country. War had a disastrous effect on Belgium, which imported 80 percent of its food. With the country's ports of entry closed, and demands on its reserves made by its occupiers, sources of food rapidly disappeared. Only a month later, Brand Whitlock, American minister to Belgium, described the grain shortage as "acute." Already hungry in the fall, the Belgians faced an even hungrier winter.
A domestic relief organization, the Comite Central de Secours et d'Alimentation of Brussels merged, under the sponsorship of the ministers of Spain and the United States, both neutral nations, but it soon realized that it could not fight the nation-wide famine certain to follow. An American engineer resident in Brussels, Millard K. Shaler, as representative of the Comite, went to London on September 26. He contacted members of the American Relief Committee and requested aid for Belgium. The A.R.C. had been formed to assist the repatriation of Americans stranded in Europe and had expected to return home once its task was accomplished. The American Relief Committee, however, was impressed favorably by Shaler's appeal. Herbert Hoover, a member of the Committee, took the case to the American ambassador to England. Eventually through negotiations it was arranged for supplies to be sent from the United States to the U. S. ambassador to England and by him to the U. S. minister to Belgium.
The Committee for Relief in Belgium was organized formally on October 22. Through delicate diplomacy, it managed to arrange for food to be sent to Belgium. By the end of February 1915, 182,000 metric tons of flour, beans and peas, maize, milk, rice, and other foodstuffs, as well as clothing, had arrived in Belgium. Famine, if not hunger, had been averted.
Although dominated by Americans, the Committee for Relief in Belgium was officially an international group, having citizens of the Netherlands and Spain on its governing board. Yet the letters in this collection are invariably addressed to the American people, American children, or to the "American Relief Committee."
It should come as no surprise that schools undertook a massive letter-writing campaign in March 1915. The C. R. B. had recognized the special nutritional requirements of children, and schools served· as kitchens for the hungry children. American children sent boat-loads of gifts to their counterparts in Belgium. This spirited campaign was not limited to the schoolchildren of Ghent. Similar letters from other children survive in the manuscript collections of the Committee for Belgian Relief and the personal papers of its administrators. These are held by the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, in Stanford, California.
In his capacity as U. S. Minister to Belgium, Brand Whitlock (1869-1934) acted as liaison for the C. R. B. with the German occupiers. For the grateful Belgians, who celebrated Washington's Birthday in 1915 with fervor, Whitlock personified the American people. On March 17, 1915, precisely when the schoolchildren were writing their letters, the Belgian Minister at Washington sent William Jennings Bryan, U. S. Secretary of State, a letter on behalf of the Belgian government in which he praised and thanked Whitlock for his efforts. Whitlock received, or rather took custody, of the
schoolchildren's letters, but he did so on behalf of the American people in his official capacity as U. S. Minister. His wife Ella Brainerd Whitlock, as her special interest, represented the United States in visits to schools and in efforts to aid Belgian children.
The object of the schoolchildren's gratitude was diffuse. "America" and "children of America" were the most common addressees. "American Relief Commission," the most precise and tangible group to which any were addressed, was used by a few. None, however, were addressed by the schoolchildren to Brand or Ella Whitlock personally. This fact creates confusion for the archivist in giving the proper name or main entry to this collection. Nevertheless, since these letters came to the collections of the University of Toledo presumably through the graces of Ella Whitlock, the accepted archival principle of provenance dictates that this collection be given the heading of Brand Whitlock.

http://www.utoledo.edu/LIBRARY/canaday/findingaids1/mss-023.pdf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Fifth battle of the Isonzo, 9-17 March 1916

The fifth battle of the Isonzo was a short-lived offensive launched at the request of Britain and France who wanted diversionary attacks to prevent the Central Powers moving more troops into the battle at Verdun.

The Italians gathered seven corps and two Alpini groups for the offensive, which began in fog, snow and rain on 9 March. The offensive was called off after eight days, partly because of the continuing poor weather and partly because General Cadorna was aware that the Austrians were planning an attack in the Trentino (battle of Asiago, 15 May-25 June 1916).

This was the least costly of the battles of the Isonzo. The Italians suffered 1,882 casualties, the Austrians 1,985. The next attack on the Isonzo, the sixth battle (6-17 August) would be the most successful so far, after the Italians moved their troops back from the Trentino to the Isonzo quicker than the Austrians.

http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_isonzo5.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Action of 17 March 1917

The Action of 17 March 1917 was a German raid on British shipping in the Strait of Dover as well as the harbours of Ramsgate and Margate. Two flotillas of German torpedo boats set out from the coast of Flanders and split. One group attacked the British drifters and destroyers patroling near Goodwin Sands, while the other attacked the towns of Ramsgate and Margate, shelling the towns and shipping in their harbors. While attempting to fight off the German squadron near Goodwin Sands, the destroyers HMS Paragon and HMS Llewellyn were torpedoed. Paragon was sunk and Llewellyn damaged before the Germans withdrew with no casualties.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Action_of_17_March_1917
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 21:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Telegram from the American Consulate in Sweden to the U.S. Secretary of State, March 17, 1917

Telegram from Morris, Ambassador to Sweden, to Byrne, U.S. Secretary of State

ERH GREEN CIPHER
FROM Stockholm
Dated March 19, 1917,

Secretary of State, Washington.

Learn from Russian Legation and other reliable sources that Russian revolutionary movement understood to be general throughout the Empire; that the revolutionists entirely successful in Petrograd and Moscow; that both cities now quiet.

General opinion among diplomatic corps in Stockholm is that if Government remains in control moderate party as at present the recent developments will be for general good of Russia and the world, but if later on control passes into the hands of extremist party outcome is more doubtful.

M O R R I S,
American Minister


http://history.hanover.edu/texts/tel1.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 22:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

From John Laffin Guide to Australian Battlefields of the Western front 1916-18

Following a strategic German withdrawal, the AIF 2nd Division occupied Bapaume from the west and southwest on 17 March 1917. Lieutenant A.C. White of the 30th battalion was the first to enter the town. He was followed by other soldiers, staff officers, war correspondents and official photographers. They found that the Germans had systematically destroyed the town and then set fire to much of it. The buildings around the main square including the town hall were the only ones in reasonably sound condition.

The cellars were searched and a mine was found in the town hall and removed. On the night of 25 March a second mine, better hidden and operated by a chemical fuse, exploded. Sleeping in the town hall were about thirty diggers, including those who ran the Australian Comforts Fund’s battlefield coffee stall, and two French parliamentary deputies. The rescuers, who dug through the rubble all that night and the next day, could save only six of the thirty.

Bapaume remained an AIF HQ for three months after its capture.

http://percysmith.blogspot.com/2007/04/chapter-25-somme-march-to-april-1917.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 22:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Alexander Agassiz (Auxiliary Schooner, in service 1918)

Alexander Agassiz, a small civilian auxiliary schooner, was active along the west coast of Mexico during the World War I era. On 17 March 1918 she was captured off Mazatlan by USS Vicksburg, whose Commanding Officer believed that she might be used by the enemy for hostile purposes. Among the fourteen people on board were five German civilians and some small arms and ammunition. Taken to San Diego for adjudication, Alexander Agassizseizure was disallowed by a prize court, which ordered that restitution be made to her owner.

Bekijk de foto's op http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-civil/civsh-a/a-agasz.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 22:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World War 1: American Soldier's Letters Home

This blog is derived from letters home from Paul Hills during the first World War. They begin in April 1917, just after the United States declared war, when he joined a volunteer ambulance unit attached to the French army.

Letter dated March 17, 1918

Dear Mother-:

Your two letters telling about Papa’s being sick came yesterday and the day before and upset me more than I can tell you. It doesn’t seem right at all in the order of things that he, always so strong, active and healthy should for no obvious reason be suddenly made temporarily an invalid. Here it is rather different and a day does not pass but that some strong man out of a perfectly clear sky is struck down and becomes suddenly simply someone that has been this or that and may be this or that when once again in the future he is on his feet. However, to have anyone in a place of peace and quiet ill seems somehow not at all fair and I can’t reconcile myself to it at all.

I am still just where I landed at the front up in my airy perch plotting out and trying to figure just what the Bosche is doing. By now tho as you can well imagine I am quite fed up with it and not a little bored. Spring seems to have fairly arrived and the weather the last week has been beautiful, quite warm and with wonderfully clear sunshiny days. Therefore I am getting less keen about staying in one place from which I only get away for two hours every other day. My leave which is due now for over a month seems to have been put off indefinitely so perhaps I may instead of going to Cannes as I had planned in the spring, it will be summer at least before I get there which is a time not so pleasant from everything I can gather.

My French is steadily getting better, I think, for I am still eating and living with a crowd of French and enjoying it as much as anything. I have dreams in French now very nearly as much as I do in English which seems to be quite an advance.

You wrote me that the coin of the realm is rather scarce at home. If you need it I can manage to send you fifty or seventy-five dollars a month for I am in the situation as long as I am at the front of not being able to spend, try as I may, the amount I get. It is the first time in my life that such a thing has happened and is certainly a unique sensation. I also the other day or rather quite a while ago spent the money I was going to send Carroll for Xmas on insuring my life in his favor for $10,000 which should anything happen I figured would help out not a little, especially since he will probably be in college then if the war doesn’t last for twenty more years.

You weren’t right in your guess about my being at (Ed: place name illegible) but tell Mr. Fougerey that I already have had the pleasure of becoming acquainted with the wine of that country.

A perfectly great package of sox came from Nannoo the other day and they were certainly welcome as I had just about run out here, having been separated from my heavy baggage for over a month. Well, this all now
Good bye. With love, Paul

http://wwar1letters.blogspot.com/2008/06/letter-dated-march-17-1918.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2010 23:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

17 March 1919, Commons Sitting

WAR SHRINE, HYDE PARK.


HC Deb 17 March 1919 vol 113 cc1726-7 1726

Mr. GILBERT asked the First Commissioner of Works whether his attention has been called to the present condition of the War Memorial in Hyde Park; and if he will state if he proposes to take any action in order that it may be kept in a proper condition by the addition of flower beds or in some other manner?

Sir A. MOND The war shrine in Hyde Park was erected by private subscription for a specific occasion—namely, Remembrance Day, 4th August, 1918, and consequently was intended to be of a temporary character. There is no authority to maintain this shrine out of public funds, but I have instructed the park staff to give all possible assistance, and this has been done. I am in communication with the donors in regard to the present condition of the shrine, for which they are responsible; but, of course, the scarcity of flowers in the winter has made it difficult to maintain it up to its original standard.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/mar/17/war-shrine-hyde-park
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2010 0:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1918)

17 maart 1918 - “Er is veel werk en er is nog wel wat te verdienen met zaken te doen, maar ik heb er nu geen tijd voor. Op Molmarkt had ik een oske gekocht. Ik heb het vijf weken gehad en doorverkocht met 500 frank winst. Een stierkalf verkocht ik na twee en een halve maand met 475 frank winst. Alles wordt duurder.” (Peter Huybrechts van het Lipseinde in Zondereigen aan zijn oom Cornelis Huybrechts, geïnterneerde soldaat in Riel)

http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=191:09-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1918&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2010 0:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bommenwerpers tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog

Hoewel de RFC en de RNAS beperkte bombardementen uitvoeren, zou het nog tot 16/17 maart 1917 duren voordat de eerste strategische bommenmissie plaatsvond. De 3th Wing van de RNAS, vliegend in Handley Page 0/100's, viel hierbij het treinstation van Moulin-les-Metz aan. Pas in oktober 1917 werd echter een specifieke eenheid voor strategische aanvallen op Duitse industriële doelen opgericht, de 41th Wing van de RFC. Uitgerust met Airco DH.4, Airco DH.9 en RAF F.E.2b bommenwerpers, had deze eenheid tot mei 1918 57 aanvallen op Duits grondgebied ondernomen.

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.be/wiki/index.php/Bommenwerpers_tijdens_de_Eerste_Wereldoorlog
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mrt 2010 0:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nat King Cole

Nathaniel Adams Coles (Montgomery, 17 maart 1919 - Santa Monica, 15 februari 1965) was een Amerikaans jazz-zanger, pianist en songwriter.

Wanneer hij in 1948 als eerste zwarte Amerikaan een huis koopt in de blanke buurt Hancock Park in Los Angeles vertellen de eigenaren hem dat ze geen "ongewensten" in de buurt willen. Cole antwoordt: "Ik ook niet. En als ik een ongewenst iemand zie komen, ben ik de eerste die klaagt."

In de jaren veertig is Cole de eerste Afro-Amerikaan met een eigen radioprogramma en in de jaren 1956-1957 heeft hij als eerste zwarte Amerikaan een eigen wekelijkse televisieshow bij NBC. Daarnaast treedt hij herhaaldelijk als filmacteur op, o.a. in St. Louis Blues.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nat_King_Cole

Zie ook http://www.natkingcole.com/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2011 20:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Krantenartikel, 17 maart 1914



http://www.olzheim.nl/krantenarchief/krantenarchief/index.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2011 20:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Jeroom Leuridan

Jeroom Leuridan (Oostvleteren, 18 juli 1894 – Ieper, 26 juli 1945) was een Vlaams-nationalistisch politicus, publicist en advocaat.

(...) In januari van het tweede oorlogsjaar startte Jeroom Leuridan een dagboek. Nauwgezet maakt hij aantekeningen over het leven vlak achter het front. Oostvleteren was niet bezet maar het front was zo dichtbij dat er regelmatig schade was door Duits artillerievuur. Op de boerderij werd hij geconfronteerd met vreemde troepen en vooral het ongedisciplineerde gedrag van Franse soldaten stoorde hem enorm. Zo was hij onder meer op 15 februari 1915 getuige van de brand van een burgerwoning die willekeurig door Franse soldaten was aangestoken. Verder getuigd hij in zijn dagboek hoe op 17 maart 1915 een Franstalige Belgische krijgsraad een Frans-onkundige soldaat veroordeelde voor lafheid. De enige Vlaamse zin in het hele proces, zo noteerde Jeroom, klonk op het einde van het proces: “Heb gue noc iets te segue?” Neen, zo vervolgt Jeroom in zijn dagboek, de jongen had niets te ‘segue’, hij had toch niets verstaan. Het is in deze periode dat de politieke opvattingen van Jeroom Leuridan, gekenmerkt door sterke anti-Franse en anti-Duitse gevoelens gevormd werden. Vanaf april 1915 schrijft hij, onder het pseudoniem Kerlinga, artikels voor de Belgische Standaard, een Nederlandstalige krant die in onbezet gebied (De Panne) werd uitgegeven tijdens de oorlog. Op 26 juni 1915 meldde Jeroom Leuridan zich als vrijwilliger voor het Belgisch leger en hij kwam, na de opleiding in het kamp van Auvours, aan het front bij het 3e Linieregiment waar hij in 1917 korporaal werd. Op 8 september 1918 werd Jeroom bij De Kippe (Merkem), in de Kwaebeek-loopgraaf in de arm getroffen door een mitrailleurkogel maar hij ging verder met zijn gevechtstroepen. Dezelfde dag werd hij door granaatscherven in beide benen getroffen toen hij de toegang tot een bunker wou forceren. (...)

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeroom_Leuridan
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Mrt 2011 20:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Naar het front, 17 maart 1915

(...) Een ander staaltje hoe Tommy op het moment vertroeteld wordt en hoe hij een potje kan breken: het gebeurde alweer op World's fair. Daar zag ik de enigen dronken man die ik tot dusver hier in Londen heb gezien. Een Tommy. Zijn dronkenschap nam de vorm aan van hinderlijke luidruchtigheid. Een bobby gaat naar hem toe en maant hem aan met zijn lawaai op te houden.

Het Dronken-Dropje: ‘You dit en dat… enz.’, alles in het zuiverste Billingsgate-dialect, wat in Londen zo ongeveer equivalent is met de fameuze Schiedamse dijk.

Bobby: ‘You… (een benaming, die wel zeer kern- en schilderachtig is, maar die onze zetters zou doen blozen, en daarom dus hier best door stippeltjes is weer te geven), if you weren't in the Army, I'd run you in like a hot poker into a barrel of butter. Je moest je schamen, je in uniform zo aan te stellen.

Het D. D. knipoogde eventjes verbouwereerd met de ogen, kwam tot bezinning en zei: ‘You are right, I'm wrong. Shake hands, and get someone to see me home.’

Bobby en het D. D. gaven elkaar de hand, en een andere militair bood zich aan zijn gealcoholiseerde makker veilig huiswaarts te loodsen.

Ware deze scène op een andere tijd voorgevallen, dan zou Bobby, die twee hoofden boven de soldaat uitstak, zonder verdere pour-parlers, deze bij zijn jaskraag hebben gepakt en naar het politiebureau hebben geleid.

Moet ik nog meer aanhalen om te bewijzen dat wat de rekrutering, en de geest van het volk in Engeland betreft, het opperbest gesteld is. Nee, het is duidelijk dat Engeland deze oorlog tot het einde toe zal, en kan voeren. Het zal zijn een ‘fight to a finish.’ Eenieder hier, de vrouwen niet het minst, is bereid een aandeel van de last op zich te nemen. Ondanks de wekelijkse verlieslijsten, de zogenaamde ‘rolls of honour,’ waarop in lange kolommen staan de namen van het beste dat Engeland bezit, namelijk jonge, viriele kerels, die hun krachtige gezonde lichamen en hun leven aan het vaderland hebben opgeofferd, en dat zijn er duizenden en misschien wel tienduizenden, ziet men weinig uiterlijke kentekenen van rouw. Het is alsof de moeders, de dochters en de vrouwen van Engeland onderling hebben afgesproken geen rouw te tonen.

Een kranig ras, dat zulke vrouwen bezit!

Een enkele verandering heeft de oorlog echter wel gebracht, een verandering die zelfs den meest oppervlakkige beschouwer opvalt, n.l. de Engelsman is iets losser geworden, ik zou bijna zeggen: meer mens. Hij heeft iets van zijn vroegere haast overdreven zelfdwang, zijn koude, reepousserende gereserveerdheid en zijn stugheid laten schieten. Hij draagt niet meer het masker waarmee hij vroeger zijn innerlijke gevoelens en emoties placht te verbergen. Hij geeft zich meer. Men ziet op straat, in openbare gebouwen, tussen mannen en vrouwen - blijkbaar van goede huize zelfs - vertrouwelijke scènes afspelen, waar men in de dagen van voor de oorlog vergeefs naar zou hebben gezocht, en welke hen die zich daaraan schuldig maakten, voor goed zouden hebben gedeclasseerd, zoals liefkozingen tussen de beide seksen, tussen in het publiek, e.d. handelingen welke door het Engelse begrip tot dusver steeds als niet geheel comme-il-faut, of zelfs indecent werden beschouwd.

Het is heus geen exaltatie, maar de werkelijke indruk die ik gekregen heb van de houding van het Engelse volk d.w.z. van de man en van de vrouw in Engeland, indien ik schrijf dat deze indruk mij aan de volgende beide regels van Jacques Normand doet denken:

Prés de l'autel du Dieu que chaque jour elie prie.
Il dressera le noble autel de la Patrie.

31 januari. Hedenmorgen liep ik langs Kingsway toen mijn aandacht getrokken werd door een groot aantal mensen dat zich op het trottoir voor een laag, onaanzienlijk gebouw verdrong. Dichterbij komende zag ik het typische, zware, imbeciele snuit van een Zuid Brabander, een Belgische soldaat in uniform, doch zonder wapens, omringd door tal van zijn landgenoten. Dat het landgenoten waren, maakte ik op uit het feit dat zij geen Engels spraken. Het moet Vlaams zijn geweest, hoewel het, wat mij betreft, ook best voor Grieks kon doorgaan. Want ik verstond er geen woord van. Als het Vlaams was, dan was het zeker geen Vlaams dat ik ooit in mijn leven heb gehoord.

Ik sprak de soldaat in het Hollands aan en stelde hem de een of andere vraag. Wat, ben ik vergeten; doet trouwens niets terzake. Met zijn lodderachtige ogen keek deze gepersonifieerde domheid mij onbegrijpend aan, stiet een paar hese, rauwe klanken uit die waarschijnlijk Vlaams moesten voorstellen, en keerde zich daarop weer tot zijn makkers.

Is er een van jullie die misschien Hollands verstaat? Or English? vroeg ik.

Geen asem. Slechts imbeciele blikken werden op me gericht. ‘Ya-t-il personne qui parle francais, donc, ici?’ vroeg ik. ‘Oui, mowa, oen poo.’ (Oui, moi, un peu), kreeg ik eindelijk van een hunner te horen.

Het Frans van de man was juist op het kantje af te begrijpen. Van hem vernam ik dat het gebouw waar zij voor stonden het gebouw was van het Belgian Relief committee; dat aan de Belgische vluchtelingen van een bepaald district in Londen daar dagelijks twee maal 's daags eten werd verstrekt; dat daar ook ondergebracht het Belgische wervingskantoor, en dat zij, al die mannen die hier buiten stonden, bedoel ik, gekomen waren om opnieuw te tekenen en naar het front te worden gezonden.

‘Is het mogelijk voor een Hollander om voor dienst bij het Belgische leger te tekenen,’ vroeg ik. Hij wist het mij niet te vertellen. Hij geloofde niet dat er bezwaren bestonden, men had mensen nodig, en zou het dus niet zo nauw nemen, meende hij. In elk geval zou ik het kunnen proberen, suggereerde hij.

Ik ging dus naar binnen, kwam eerst terecht in een grote ruime zaal, die tjokvol was met vrouwen en kinderen, geschaard aan lange tafels, elk met een kommetje soep en andere spijzen voor zich. Een dame, een geboren aristocrate in houding en uiterlijk, zeker een lady zo-en-zo die de boel presideert, komt op me af en spreekt mij aan in het Engels. In het Engels zei ik haar dat ik naar het Belgian Recruting- Office zocht.

‘Waarvoor?’ vroeg zij me indiscreet. ‘Om me voor den dienst aan te melden’. „Maar U is toch geen Belg; aan uw spraak te oordelen tenminste’. Een compliment op mijn Engels, waar ik niet anders dan gevoelig voor kon zijn.

‘Neen, ik ben Hollander; dat is in deze tijden zowat sama-djoega.’

’Ik vrees meneer, dat ze geen buitenlanders aannemen, U kunt het in elk geval proberen. Gaat u dat vertrek maar binnen’.

Het was dus al met een heel schijntje hoop op succes dat ik de mij aangeduide deur opende en een klein kamertje binnentrad, dat zoals bleek, een aparte uitgang had naar de straat en dat vroeger waarschijnlijk dienst had gedaan als tokolokaal. Want er stond nog een toonbank in. Hiervoor stonden tal van mannen, sommigen geheel in uniform, anderen maar gedeeltelijk zo, maar de meeste helemaal zonder uniform. Erachter zaten een paar burgers aan een afzonderlijk klein tafeltje te schrijven, en een officier, die er wel zeer slordig, verfomfaaid en ongekamd uitzag, maar wiens pittig, mannelijke gezicht toch een prettige indruk maakte. Twee even slordig uitziende onderofficieren hielpen hem.

Aan mijn meer gesoigneerd uiterlijk, dat natuurlijk afstak bij de bende om me heen, dankte ik het waarschijnlijk dat de officier de anderen liet wachten en mij onmiddellijk, dus vóór mijn beurt, te woord stond.

‘Plait-il?’
‘Je voudrais bien m'engager’, zei ik.
’Dat is goed,’ en een register bijhalende vroeg hij:
‘Uw naam?’
‘Flotsam.’
‘Geboorteplaats en datum van geboorte?’

Whitehall had me een les geleerd en de dame in het lokaal ernaast had me op m'n hoede gesteld. Ik antwoordde dus met een stalen gezicht ‘Antwerpen. Zo-en-zo oud!’ Aan een dergelijke leugen, - eenb'pieux mensonge zoals de Fransen het noemen - barst men niet, dacht ik. ‘

‘Tekent U hier uw naam maar en toont mij dan uw papieren!’

‘Papieren? Mais, je n'en ai pas. Je les ai perdus,’ zei ik. ‘Dan zult u zich eerst moeten legitimeren bij de consul. Voordien kunnen wij u niet aannemen. C'est bien dommage, mais c'est I'ordre, monsieur.‘

Dus alweer een streep door de rekening. Want het zou mij nooit gelukken de consul voor 't lapje te houden. En zelfs de poging daartoe, indien uitgevonden, zou mij in deze tijden, dat men in elke buitenlander een spion ziet, in een hoogst onaangenaam parket brengen.

Ik probeerde het dus over een andere boeg te gooien en zei, dat ik een vriend had ter plaatse, die, hoewel Hollander van geboorte, zijn gehele leven lang in België had doorgebracht en zich geheel met dat land en die natie vereenzelvigd had. Zou het die vriend toegestaan worden om dienst te nemen in het Belgische leger, vroeg ik.

‘Ik denk wel van niet, meneer. Wij kunnen den man in elk geval niet aannemen. De enige kans, die hij heeft om in het leger te komen is zich naar Havre te begeven, en daar de minister persoonlijk op te zoeken. Ik geloof evenwel niet dat hij slagen zal, want, voor zoover mij bekend, nemen wij geen vreemdelingen op.’

Hiermede moest ik mij wel tevreden stellen en ging dus heen.

Enfin, om 't verhaal niet al te lang te maken, kan ik nog in 't kort mededelen dat ik ook een bezoek heb gebracht aan het Franse Consulaat, of liever twee bezoeken. Ik vond het gedrang daar evenwel op beide keren zo groot, van mensen, die hun paspoorten kwamen halen, of brengen, of lieten viseren, dat ik, na beide malen - een paar uren te hebben geblauwbekt, maar weer heenging zonder den consul te zien.

8 februari. Ik heb nu de keuze tussen naar Havre te gaan en verder door naar Parijs om te zien of het daar voor den duur van den oorlog opgerichte Legion Etrangère een realiteit of een fictie is, of naar Montreal via New-York, om te trachten me als Amerikaan bij het Canadese contingent te doen inlijven.

Aangezien Havre me het zekerst toeschijnt, en de reis derwaarts in elk geval minder kostbaar is dan naar New York, ga ik er morgen heen.

Voor ik deze brief sluit, nog een enkel woord over den economische toestand. Men zal mij tegenwerpen dat ik na een verblijf van 5 dagen nauwelijks bevoegd ben om hierover te oordelen. Ik geef dit onmiddellijk toe en mijn oordeel kan uit de aard van de zaak slechts een zeer oppervlakkig zijn en geen grote waarde hebben. En toch ik heb Londen van Noord tot Zuid, van Oost tot West doorkruist, ik heb tal van gelegenheden opgezocht waar het publiek zich vermaakte, heb gesprekken aangeknoopt met mensen van allerlei slag, heb de armere stadswijken bezocht, de kleine gemene nachtkroegen, de grote restaurants, de picture palaces, de publieke danszalen, de schouwburgen, de tearooms, de eethuizen waar men zich voor een shilling (60 ets) vol kan eten. Ik heb de verschillende redactiebureaus afgelopen, zit den godganse dag in de ‘tube’ of in de ‘bus’, of anders in een taxi naast de chauffeur, en hoor de mensen uit. Ik heb de verklaringen van den een kunnen toetsen aan die van tal van anderen en kan, gesteund ook door hetgeen mijn ogen hebben aanschouwd, dus tot een conclusie komen, die, hoe oppervlakkig dan ook, toch niet geheel verkeerd kan zijn.

De gevolgtrekking is deze, namelijk dat de toestand over het algemeen niet zo slecht is. Er kan armoede heersen, maar van bepaald gebrek, nooddruft, heb ik nog niets gezien. Slechts één geval van bedelarij heb ik gezien gedurende al mijn zwerftochten bij dag en nacht door Londens straten, een oude vrouw, die plotseling uit een donker hoekje op mij af kwam schieten en me met bevende stem vroeg of ik geen kleinigheid kon missen. Zij was juist uit haar ‘lodgings’ gezet, vertelde zij, omdat zij de huur niet langer kon betalen. Men komt uit Indië; is niet gewend een Europese vrouw gebrek te zien lijden; het is koud en guur; dus men geeft, daar waar de Londenaar zelf haar misschien zou zijn voorbijgelopen, en men geeft allicht meer, dan een ander zou doen, omdat men uit Indië komt, en omdat men geeft uit naam van de een of ander die men liefheeft en achter heeft gelaten, een vader, een moeder, een vrouw of iemand anders, in de hoop dat de zegen van zoon gift op haar of op zijn hoofd zal komen

Zelfs van verkapte bedelarij, zoals dat gedaan wordt onder het mom van veter- of lucifersverkopen, plaveisel tekenen, enz. zag ik weinig.
De lokalen voor publiek vermakelijkheden zijn, voor zoover ik die heb bezocht, druk bezocht.

In de bars, de restaurants, de eethuizen en op de marktplaatsen is het vertier groot. De prijzen van de levensmiddelen zijn wel wat gestegen gedurende de laatste zes maanden, maar toch niet zo dat die verhoging drukt.

Dat het Zeppelingevaar toch niet geheel denkbeeldig is, zoals ik dacht, blijkt uit hetgeen ik gisteravond van een bobby, dien ik tot vriend heb gemaakt, vernam, namelijk dat er tegen half zeven 's avonds plotseling een paar van die luchtschepen zich plotseling in de buurt van Deale of Gravesend hebben vertoond, doch weer door het geschut van de Theems forten werden teruggedreven. Ik heb de morgenbladen nog niet kunnen inzien en' weet dus niet wat hiervan aan is. (...)

http://www.greatdutchwar.nl/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=409%3Anaar-het-front-17-maart-1915&catid=73%3Agroot-brittannie&Itemid=74
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group