Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

23 Februari

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Feb 2006 6:43    Onderwerp: 23 Februari Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 23. Februar

1914


1915
Vernichtende russische Verluste bei Grodno
Luftbombardement von Calais
Der englische Truppentransportdampfer "192" versenkt
Erfolgreiche Kämpfe am Dnjestr

1916
Einbruch in die französische Front nördlich Verdun
Italienische Vorstellungen bei Durazzo erobert
Asquiths Friedensbedingungen
Die "Westburn" versenkt
Neutralitätsbruch Portugals

1917
Erfolg der Stoßtrupps bei Zloczow
Bewilligung eines neuen Kriegskredits von fünfzehn Milliarden
Schwere englische Verluste bei Fellahie

1918
Walk und Dubno besetzt
Erhöhte Gefechtstätigkeit am Hartmannsweilerkopf
Erfolgreiche Kreuzfahrt des Hilfskreuzers "Wolf"
Dubno besetzt
Der Vierbund zu Friedensverhandlungen mit Rußland bereit

http://www.stahlgewitter.com
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Feb 2006 6:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

February 23

1917 Germans begin withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line

On this day in 1917, German troops begin a well-planned withdrawal—ordered several weeks previously by Kaiser Wilhelm—to strong positions on the Hindenburg Line, solidifying their defense and digging in for a continued struggle on the Western Front in World War I.

One month after Paul von Hindenburg succeeded Erich von Falkenhayn as chief of the German army’s general staff in August 1916, he ordered the construction of a heavily fortified zone running several miles behind the active front between the north coast of France and Verdun, near the border between France and Belgium. Its aim would be to hold the last line of German defense and brutally crush any Allied breakthrough before it could reach the Belgian or German frontier. The British referred to it as the Hindenburg Line, for its mastermind; it was known to the Germans as the Siegfried Line.

In the wake of exhausting and bloody battles at Verdun and the Somme, and with the U.S edging ever closer to entering the war, Germany’s leaders looked to improve their defensive positions on the Western Front. The withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line meant that German troops were removed to a more uniform line of trenches, reducing the length of the line they had to defend by 25 miles and freeing up 13 army divisions to serve as reserve troops. On their way, German forces systematically destroyed the land they passed through, burning farmhouses, poisoning wells, mining abandoned buildings and demolishing roads.

The German command correctly estimated that the move would gain them eight weeks of respite before the Allies could begin their attacks again; it also threw a wrench into the Allied strategy by removing their army from the very positions that British and French joint command had planned to strike next. After the withdrawal, which was completed May 5, 1917, the Hindenburg Line, considered impregnable by many on both sides of the conflict, became the German army’s stronghold. Allied armies did not break it until October 1918, one month before the armistice.

http://www.historychannel.com/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 17:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

23 February 1914, Commons Sitting

Hague Conference.


HC Deb 23 February 1914 vol 58 cc1374-6 1374

Mr. BARNES asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, if he is aware that the last Hague Conference, among its last acts, registered a recommendation to the Powers that a third conference should be held within a time corresponding to that between the first and second, that a programme should be prepared beforehand so as to secure the deliberations being conducted with authority and expedition, and that it would be desirable that some two years before the probable date of the meeting a preparatory committee should be charged by the Governments with the task of collecting the various proposals to be submitted to the Conference and of ascertaining what subjects were ripe for International Regulations as well as preparing a programme upon which the Governments should decide in sufficient time to allow careful examination in each country; will he say if, in accordance with the above, it falls within the province of the British Government, without reference to any other Power, to appoint its National Committee to prepare its own proposals for the preparatory committee; has he now received a communication from the United States Government with regard to the date of the third Hague Conference; has the British Government made any suggestions to, or received any from, any other Powers as to how the International Preparatory Committee should be appointed; if not, will they now make suggestions; and will he assure the House that the Government desires an early meeting of the Conference, and that better preparations will be made than in 1899 and 1907 for the initiation of proposals in which this country is interested?

Mr. ACLAND The answer to the first part of the question is in the affirmative. From this the hon. Member will see that at the last Hague Conference every step was taken to secure that the next Conference should be prepared for in the best possible way, except that no agreement was come to as to the manner in which the preliminary International Committee should be summoned and composed. This was apparent before the Conference separated, and the representatives of 1375 His Majesty's Government at the Conference made several informal suggestions towards the settlement of the question, but their efforts were not successful. It being the wish of His Majesty's Government to avoid any possible controversy with other Powers on these preliminary questions, they think it undesirable that the initiative should be taken by a Power which has already put forward suggestions which did not prove generally acceptable, and which has not been able to ratify some of the agreements come to in 1907. I am glad to say that I have to-day received a communication from the Government of the United States of America, making suggestions for an International Committee. This will at once receive most careful consideration. No suggestions have so far as I am aware been made by any other Powers on this subject.

With regard to the method which each Government may follow to formulate its views on subjects which may be discussed, this, as I said last Wednesday, is a matter for each Government itself to determine. In connection with the Second Peace Conference, an Interdepartmental Committee was set up, under the chairmanship of the then Attorney-General, to advise as to the programme to be discussed and the views to be put forward on behalf of His Majesty's Government, and similar machinery may be employed with regard to the next Conference at the proper time. I can assure the hon. Member that His Majesty's Government have no desire to postpone the Conference, but any attempt to hold it at a date earlier than that which would suit the convenience of the Powers participating would tend to defeat the objects for which these Conferences are held. I cannot accept the suggestion that His Majesty's Government did not adequately prepare for the Conferences of 1899 and 1907. On the contrary, the greatest pains were taken to examine fully every question involving the interests of this country.

Mr. BARNES Are we to take it that the Government has not yet taken any steps of its own to set up our own National Committee?

Mr. ACLAND No; because up till now we have not been certain at all as to when, or how, or with whom the preliminary International Conference will be held. If the proposal which is made by the United States should prove generally acceptable, 1376 we will at once take steps to prepare questions to be discussed.

Mr. J. A. BAKER May I ask if the Government is prepared to co-operate heartily with the United States in having this Conference come to?

Mr. ACLAND Oh, certainly!

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1914/feb/23/hague-conference
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 17:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HMS Cordelia (1914)

HMS Cordelia was a C-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy. She was part of the Caroline group of the C-class of cruisers.

She was laid down in July 1913, launched 23 February 1914 and commissioned into the navy in January 1915. She was assigned to the 1st Light Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet, and on 31 May to 1 June 1916 Cordelia took part in the Battle of Jutland with a number of her sisters. In 1917 she was reassigned to the 4th Light Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet. She survived the war.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Cordelia_(1914)
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 17:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Edith Elizabeth APPLETON O.B.E. R.R.C.

British Expeditionary Force
Nº 3. Clearing Station
23.2.15

My dearest Mother,
– – – – – – at present I have charge of the theatre and we are having quite a busy time there – – – – The knitted things were very soon used up by the Tommies – Before I forget it I will tell you that things are more needed here than anywhere – we are like a bottomless pit for socks – shirts – pyjamas +c and sometimes use more than 50 pairs of socks in one day – You see we get the men soaking wet from the trenches and have to change all their clothes – If you like for a change to make heelless socks, very loosely knitted, they are so useful for frozen feet – we put them on over cotton wool –
I went for a pleasant country walk yesterday, the country was very sodden & under water, but the air fresh & sunny. I don't wonder that it is the fashion to wear clogs here – the roads are the last word in horribleness to walk on – it is like walking over the rocks in St Margarets Bay, when the road is rather cut up.
My cold is nearly gone – St Omer was rather a coldy place I think, and so was Hazebrouck – but this is much better.
With love to all etc – – Edie
P. S. If anyone has a parcel of woollen socks &c to spare – please send them to
Sister E. E. Appleton –
British Expeditionary Force
No. 3. Clearing Station –
G. P. O. London.

http://www.edithappleton.org.uk/EarlyLetters/Letter19150223_transcript.pdf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 17:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

On February 23, 1915, Nevada passed a divorce law that made divorce possible after only six months of residency. It was the first easy divorce law in the United States.

http://askville.amazon.com/Monday-yuck-23-09--but-CArnival/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=40387608
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 17:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

BRITISH MERCHANT SHIPS LOST AT SEA DUE TO ENEMY ACTION

OAKBY, 1,976grt, 23 February 1915, 4 miles E by N from Royal Sovereign LV, torpedoed without warning and sunk by submarine

BRANKSOME CHINE, 2,026grt, 23 February 1915, 6 miles E by S ¾ S from Beachy Head, torpedoed without warning and sunk by submarine

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1LossesBrMS1914-16.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 18:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Battle of Verdun, 1916
Verdun remained in French hands, although the defensive situation was dire. A message was sent to French headquarters on 23 February reporting that Driant had been lost, as had all company commanders, and that the battalion had been reduced from 600 to around 180 men.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/verdun.htm

February 23, 1916
French artillery kills entire French 72nd division at Samogneux Verdun

http://www.brainyhistory.com/events/1916/february_23_1916_77696.html


23 februari 1916
De Duitsers overspoelen de vlakte van Wavrille waardoor de Fransen genoodzaakt zijn l'Herbebois te verlaten. Val van Brabant, op de avond is de frontlinie Samogneux-Ferme d'Anglemont-Beaumont-de noordelijke bosranden van Bois des Fosses en Bois Le Chaume-Ornes.

http://www.verdun.nl/1916.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 22 Feb 2010 18:37, in toaal 2 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 18:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI.

Vol. 150 - February 23, 1916.

The German Government has put restrictions on the sale of sauerkraut, and a hideous rumour is afoot to the effect that they are preparing to use it on the prisoners by forcible feeding.

An interned German was recently given a week's freedom in which to get married, and the interesting question has now been raised as to whether his children, when they reach the age of twenty-one, will be liable to the Conscription Act or will have to be interned as alien enemies.

According to Miss Ellen Terry but little attention has been given by the critics to the letters in Shakspeare's plays. We rather thought that one of Germany's intelligent young professors had recently subjected the letters to a searching analysis, the result being to establish beyond a reasonable doubt that England started the War.

From The Observer:—
"The King has sent a congratulatory letter to Mrs. Mann of Nottingham, who has nine sons serving in the Army and Navy. This is believed to be a record for one working-class family."
Though a mere bagatelle, of course, for the idle rich.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22697/22697-h/22697-h.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 18:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Tsarist Downfall of February 1917
Political activism was escalating. Radicals from within the Duma and from without openly incited the country to rebellion. All of the political parties united against the monarchy in face of its increasing weakness. The conservatives started to believe that "the only way to save the monarchy was to remove the monarch.". Calls were made to the workers to strike and to call for the removal of the autocratic regime. On 23 February 1917, a women's procession organized by socialists marched in Petrograd. The following day, workers began to strike.

Lees verder: http://www.echeat.com/essay.php?t=25751

The Russian Revolution of February 1917: The Question of Organisation and Spontaneity
Guchkov and his associates scheduled their coup d’etat for March 1917. If it had gone according to plan it would have preceded the most likely crisis point at which a popular revolution would erupt - the Bolshevik demonstration planned for May Day. But something happened which upset everyone’s plans. When Kayurov and his friends called a demonstration on 23 February to mark International Women’s Day, they did not foresee that this would continue on the 24th, and would increase in scale.

Lees verder: http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~semp/revolution.htm

February revolution 1917 - what lessons for today?
On 23 February, the women textile workers, without prior agreement from any party, went on strike in several factories, which led to mass demonstrations in the city. This opened the floodgates of revolution, which unfolded over the next five days.

Lees verder: http://socialistworld.net/eng/2007/03/16history.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 19:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

23 februari 1917

De zwaarbeschadigde Duitse torpedoboot 'V 69' wordt door de Nederlandse stoomtrawler 'Eems' naar de haven van IJmuiden gesleept. Het schip was de vorige avond in gevecht gewikkeld geweest met Britse schepen, die verhinderden dat het schip zou opstomen naar Zeebrugge. Aan boord bevinden zich een groot aantal doden en gewonden, waarbij sommigen aan dek waren vastgevroren. Een deel van de doden zal later naar Duitsland worden overgebracht, een ander deel wordt in IJmuiden begraven. De zwaargewonden worden overgebracht naar het militair hospitaal in Amsterdam. Het is de bedoeling dat de 'V 69' na noodreparaties naar Rotterdam zal worden overgebracht. Het schip weet echter tijdens de reis (11 februari) hier naar toe tijdens dichte mist zelfstandig naar Wilhelmshafen uit te wijken.
Bron: E. Gröner: 'Die deutschen kriegsschiffe 1815-1945'

Het vrachtschip ss. 'Salland' (1905) van de Koninklijke Hollandsche Lloyd, op weg van Amsterdam naar Buenos Aires, onder kapitein A. Vreugdenhil, wordt op de Noordzee door de Duitse onderzeeboot 'U 55' getorpedeerd. Alle opvarenden kunnen worden gered en aan boord worden genomen van de Britse torpedobootjager HMS 'Hope' en vervolgens te Plymouth aan wal worden gezet.
Bron: L.L. von Münching: 'De Nederlandse koopvaardij in WO I (1917)' in: 'DBW' jrg. 57 nr. 9 (2002)

http://www.scheepvaartmuseum.nl/collectie/maritieme-kalender?j=&m=1&d=23
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 19:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Lenin on the Need to Accept Brest-Litovsk Peace Terms, 23 February 1918

Reproduced below is the text of Lenin's appeal of 23 February 1918 calling for Russian acceptance of peace terms dictated by representatives of the Central Powers at Brest-Litovsk.

Lenin was concerned at moves by his associates to first protest at and then unilaterally withdraw from the peace conference. In his address he explained that his worst fears were becoming evident, i.e. that as the Russian Army failed to respond to orders so the peace terms on offer became ever more punitive and annexationist.

He therefore recommended that the peace terms currently on offer be accepted (albeit reluctantly) and that Russians should remain confident that revolution would similarly sweep over other European nations (including Germany).

Consequently Russia indicated its willingness to sign the treaty on 28 February; it was duly signed on 3 March 1918.

Lenin's Address Urging Acceptance of the Brest-Litovsk Peace Treaty, 23 February 1918
The German reply offers peace terms still more severe than those of Brest-Litovsk. Nevertheless, I am absolutely convinced that to refuse to sign these terms is only possible to those who are intoxicated by revolutionary phrases.

Up till now I have tried to impress on the members of the party the necessity of clearing their minds of revolutionary cant. Now I must do this openly, for unfortunately my worst forebodings have been justified.

Party workers in January declared war on revolutionary phrases, and said that a policy of refusal to sign a peace would perhaps satisfy the craving for effectiveness - and brilliance - but would leave out of account the objective correlation of class forces and material factors in the present initial moment of the Socialist revolution.

They further said that if we refused to sign the peace then proposed more crushing defeats would compel Russia to conclude a still more disadvantageous separate peace.

The event proved even worse than I anticipated, for our retreating army seems demoralized and absolutely refuses to fight. Only unrestrained phrasemaking can impel Russia at this moment and in these conditions to continue the war, and I personally would not remain a minute longer either in the Government or in the Central Committee of our party if the policy of phrasemaking were to prevail.

This new bitter truth has revealed itself with such terrible distinctness that it is impossible not to see it. All the bourgeoisie in Russia is jubilant at the approach of the Germans.

Only a blind man or men infatuated by phrases can fail to see that the policy of a revolutionary war without an army is water in the bourgeois mill. In the bourgeois papers there is already exaltation in view of the impending overthrow of the Soviet Government by the Germans.

We are compelled to submit to a distressing peace. It will not stop revolution in Germany and Europe. We shall now begin to prepare a revolutionary army, not by phrases and exclamations, as did those who after January 10th did nothing even to attempt to stop our fleeing troops, but by organized work, by the creation of a serious national, mighty army.

Their knees are on our chest, and our position is hopeless. This peace must be accepted as a respite enabling us to prepare a decisive resistance to the bourgeoisie and imperialists.

The proletariat of the whole world will come to our aid. Then we shall renew the fight.


Source: Source Records of the Great War, Vol. VI, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/brestlitovsk_lenin.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 20:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Enigma machine

An Enigma machine is any of a family of related electro-mechanical rotor machines used for the encryption and decryption of secret messages. The first Enigma was invented by German engineer Arthur Scherbius at the end of World War I. This model and its variants were used commercially from the early 1920s, and adopted by military and government services of several countries—most notably by Nazi Germany before and during World War II. A range of Enigma models were produced, but the German military model, the Wehrmacht Enigma, is the version most commonly discussed. (...)

On 23 February 1918 German engineer Arthur Scherbius applied for a patent for a cipher machine using rotors and, with E. Richard Ritter, founded the firm of Scherbius & Ritter. They approached the German Navy and Foreign Office with their design, but neither was interested. They then assigned the patent rights to Gewerkschaft Securitas, who founded the Chiffriermaschinen Aktien-Gesellschaft (Cipher Machines Stock Corporation) on 9 July 1923; Scherbius and Ritter were on the board of directors.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enigma_machine
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 20:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

SM U-118...

... was a type UE II mine laying submarine of the Imperial German Navy and one of 329 submarines serving with that navy during World War I. U-118 engaged in naval warfare and took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic.

With the ending of hostilities on 11 November 1918 came the subsequent surrender of the Imperial German Navy, including SM U-118 to France on 23 February 1919.

in the early hours of 15 April 1919, while it was being towed through the English Channel towards Scapa Flow, its dragging hawser broke off in a storm. The ship ran aground on the beach at Hastings in Sussex.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_U-118
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2010 20:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

23 February 1920, Commons Sitting

EX-KAISER.


HC Deb 23 February 1920 vol 125 c1287 1287

Sir H. BRITTAIN asked whether Holland has decided to keep the ex-Kaiser in Curacoa?

Mr. BONAR LAW No intimation of the decision of the Netherlands Government has yet reached His Majesty's Government.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1920/feb/23/ex-kaiser
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Feb 2010 13:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

23 February Sold Ludwig Eckert

Sold Ludwig Eckert, 8 Komp, 18 (Bay) Inf Regt (6 (Bav) Bde, 3rd Bav Div).

Aged 22, Ludwig was killed in action during defensive actions in the region of the ‘Bluff' on the Ypres - Comines Canal. He has no known grave.

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-people/remember-on-this-day.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Feb 2010 13:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Turkish Front, 1917

In Mesopotamia, the British recaptured Kut-el-Amara February 23, 1917. They then advanced up the Tigris River and captured Baghdad March 11, forcing the Turks to retreat from Persia. Russian forces began to advance into western Persia in March but withdrew in July because of the Russian Revolution.

http://history.howstuffworks.com/world-war-i/world-war-i-in-19175.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Tandorini



Geregistreerd op: 11-6-2007
Berichten: 7014

BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Feb 2010 18:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oprichting van het Rode Leger op 23 februari 1918. Er bestond daarvoor al een Rode Garde maar die diende meer als een soort partijpolitie van de Bolsjewieken dan als een leger. Leon Trotski wordt beschouwd als de oprichter en organisator.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 18:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

George Barnett - Major General, United States Marine Corps



He was appointed Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps on February 25, 1914 and served in that position, as the twelfth Commandant of the Marine Corps, until June 30, 1920. He commanded the Corps during its preparation for and active participation in the World War, for which service France conferred upon him the Legion of Honor, and the United States the Distinguished Service Medal.

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/gbarnett.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 18:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Een nacht in de Belgische loopgraven - Reportage van oorlogscorrespondent Izak Samson

I

Hondschooten, 23 Februari 1915.

Ik heb de gelegenheid waargenomen een nacht in een loopgraaf door te brengen.
Bij Diksmuide waren nog weer pas nieuwe, flinke versterkingen aangelegd, en deze hadden nog wel het comfort, dat zulke nieuwe loopgraven kunnen aanbieden. Geruimen tijd was Diksmuide met rust gelaten: de aanvallen hadden meer elders plaats gehad. Ik verwachtte dus hier het leven in een loopgraaf te zullen meemaken zonder stoornis.

Des namiddags ging ik van hier uit met een auto mee. In plm. 1 uur was ik tot op twee kilometer afstand van het eigenlijke doel. 't Was nog te licht om nu al in de donkere holte te kruipen. Ik sloop dus met mijn geleider - want zonder dien komt men er niet door - nog wat rond.

Ik kon nu nog eens rustig de omgeving opnemen. Een troosteloozer aanblik dan hier heb ik nimmer gehad. Rondom niets dan puin. Puin op, langs en in het water. Hier en daar buiten de eigenlijke kom van het dorp, een enkele woning, of liever overblijfselen van vroegere woningen. Hier en daar een muurbrok, met soms een goedkoope verkleurde prent er aan. Nog weer elders stukken van huisraad die boven de puinhoopen uitsteken. Zelfs het overblijfsel eener wieg, stak boven een steenmassa uit. Natuurlijk was het een ijzeren geraamte. Hout zou allang een prooi van het vuur uit de loopgraven geworden zijn.

Doch ik zag ook nog wat anders. Ik zag, hoe de Belgen hier den tijd hadden benut, om hun stellingen meer stevigheid te geven. Niet alleen, dat haar verdedigende waarde verhoogd is, doch ze zijn nu voor een deel herschapen in aanvalspunten. Met allerlei schiettuig en materiaal heeft men dit resultaat verkregen. Trouwens, aan heel de stelling aan den IJzer is 't duidelijk te bemerken, dat waterbouwkunde en aanverwante kennis hier goed is toegepast.

Luguber is het te zien wat hier alzoo komt aandrijven. Langs heel dit gebied raakt er hoe langer hoe meer los uit den zwaren kleigrond. Lijken en voorwerpen worden langzaam door den bodem losgelaten, en voor zoover het kan drijven komt het aan de oppervlakte.

Dag aan dag, wanneer het water door een stevigen wind in beweging wordt gebracht, spoelen langs de dijken die de inundatie begrenzen, lijken aan. Steeds vergezellen een aantal aasvogels de voor hen los gekomen prooi. Aanvankelijk poogden de hier liggende Belgen de lijken aan de aasvogels te ontnemen en ze te begraven. Doch al spoedig moesten ze die pogingen opgeven, omdat de Duitschers hen bij dit werk beschoten. Het zweven der vogels boven hun prooi diende zelfs als aanduiding der mikpunten. Nu laat men de zuivering aan die dieren over.

De Belgen hebben hier langs het kanaal en den spoorweg nu stellingen kunnen betrekken, die hen in staat stellen zwaarder geschut aan te voeren. Dit is aan dien kant van groot belang, omdat zij daardoor te beter het niet-geïnundeerde gebied kunnen bewerken.

Ik heb hier wel den indruk gekregen dat een goed voorbereide en verdedigde waterlinie een beter weermiddel is dan forten, zeker beter is dan boven den grond uitstekende forten. Het bouwen van forten die boven den grond uitsteken, zeide mij een genie- officier, is het geven van schietdoelen voor de tegenpartij. 't Was gebleken, dat goed aangelegde aardwerken beter waren en ook goedkooper dan gewapende betonforten. De taaie grond is een beter verdedigingsmiddel dan het hardste cement of staal.

Na aldus met rondzien en luisteren den tijd te hebben doorgebracht, werd ik naar de loopgraaf geleid; men bracht mij in het gedeelte waar de wachtcommandant, met zijn kleinen staf is ingericht. De aarden wanden waren met ijzeren platen beschoten, en om het wat gezelliger te maken, had men allerhande illustraties tegen de muren gehecht. Natuurlijk waren de portretten van het Koningspaar te vinden tegenover den ingang. De ernstige, doch goedhartige gelaatstrekken van Koning Albert vielen onmiddellijk bij het binnentreden op, wijl de stralen eener carbidlamp het geheele vertrek verlichtten. Natuurlijk ontbreken evenmin de portretten van de generaals Leman en Joffre. Zelfs burgemeester Max hing er.

Een juichkreet ging er op, toen ik een pakje thee, eenige citroenen, een zakje suikerklontjes en vooral een pakje Hollandsche tabak te voorschijn haalde. Dat was hier een ongekende weelde. Een ketel, die natuurlijk uit de puinhoopen was gezocht, werd nu op een kacheltje gezet, en men zou nu toch eens thee zetten. Doch daarmee belastte ik mij liever zelf, omdat ik uit ervaring weet dat ze dan naar mijn smaak is. Zoo zouden we 't ons dus zoo gezellig mogelijk maken.

Intusschen kreeg ik allerlei geschiedenissen te hooren die stof zouden geven voor menigen brief. Zoo vernam ik allereerst dat de Duitschers nu sedert kort waren begonnen de loopgraven hunner tegenpartij met brandende benzine te bespuiten. Voorheen stelden ze zich tevreden met het verbranden van hun eigen dooden, nu beproeven ze de levende tegenstanders te dooden.

Ik schreef reeds eerder, dat men hier telkens wat nieuws beleefde op het gebied van dood en vernieling. 't Spreekt vanzelf dat zulk gedoe weer tegenmiddelen uitlokt. Ik had intusschen de thee gereed, en nu werd ze in allerhande drinkgerei uitgeschonken. Al wie er buiten gemist kon worden, werd binnengeroepen om een bakje te halen. Den anderen werd 't gebracht.

Nu kwam men gezellig bij elkaar zitten, we waren juist met een dozijn bijeen. De helft was reeds oudgedienden, d.w.z. ze waren van 't begin van den oorlog af in functie. Drie van hen behoorden reeds voordien tot het staande leger, als beroepsoldaten. Dat waren natuurlijk gegradueerden. Ze hadden heel veel meegemaakt. Een ervan was o.a. bij den strijd in Luik geweest. Hij vertelde met hoe groot vertrouwen men aldaar rekende op de forten. Men meende na de eerste dagen stellig dat de Duitschers er niet zouden doorkomen. Zooveel te grooter was de teleurstelling, toen het Duitsche zware geschut, het eene fort na het andere in elkaar geschoten had.

Toen begonnen deskundigen reeds te twijfelen aan de onneembaarheid van Antwerpen. Men had toch hier de verschrikkelijke uitwerking van het moderne vestinggeschut gezien. Doch wat kon men doen? Daarbij kwam het gerucht van het gebeurde met de bevolking te Visé en elders. Men was wanhopig verbitterd op de Duitschers. Van Fransche hulp was, verzekerde mijn zegsman, toen volstrekt geen sprake. Alles moest men alleen opknappen. Na den val van Luik trokken de meesten af. Dit wil zeggen, nadat de forten in puin waren geschoten, had een groot deel der bezetting zich weten te redden door de vlucht. Toch vielen er nog velen in handen der Duitschers.

De verteller zelf had zich langs omwegen naar Antwerpen begeven. Door de verrassing was men wel iets in de war. En het feit dat de Duitschers plots met een zeer groote macht binnenvielen, gaf voedsel aan het vermoeden, dat ze door Ho1land waren gekomen. Nu wist men wel beter: ‘De Ollanders? Ons menschen waren al dood geweest als gullie ons nie eten hadden gegeven.’ Ik bemerkte met genoegen dat de waarheid nu toch overal doordrong. Het verhaal ging verder over de voorbereiding der verdediging van de vesting Antwerpen. Doch over wat volgde, hoop ik morgen te vertellen. Want aanstonds gaat er een goede geest van hier, die mijn blaadjes kan meenemen.

II

Hondschooten, 23 Februari 1915.

Terwijl wij zoo voortpraatten, was het omstreeks 10 uur geworden. Toen klonk er een schot door de stille avondlucht. Het was gelost door een der mannen, die de uitkijkwacht had. Alleen in een uiterst geval mag er geschoten worden. Er moest dus iets belangrijks te doen zijn.

Onmiddellijk werd ons licht gedoofd, en allen werden doodstil. Men zond een der daartoe aangewezen mannen naar buiten. Ik vond 't vreemd dat niet allen terstond naar buiten stormden. Doch later bleek mij dat dit juist goed was. Na eenige minuten kwam 't rapport.

Een man was nader gekomen van de tegenovergestelde zijde en was niet blijven staan op het commando. Nadat men heel voorzichtig den omtrek had opgenomen trad men nader. Twee soldaten haalden den aangeschoten man, doch plotseling klonken nu schoten uit een tiental geweren. Nu kwamen de mannen uit hun schuilplaatsen. Een vijftigtal verspreidden zich bliksemsnel over de loopgraven en ieder koos een der schimmen die ze zagen, tot mikpunt. Drie vielen, om niet weer op te staan, de anderen verwijderden zich.

Intusschen waren de eerst uitgetrokken soldaten den aangeschotene genaderd. 't Was een Duitsch onderofficier, die 't einde van een lange lont bij een vaatje met springstof hield. Blijkbaar was dus de bedoeling geweest mijn logies in de lucht te laten vliegen.
De waakzaamheid van den schildwacht had dat intijds verhinderd. Het vaatje werd buitgemaakt.

Nu was 't voor het verdere van den nacht met onze rust gedaan. Ieder oogenblik verwachtte ik een aanval. Doch de wachtcommandant zeide mij, dat alleen bij het welgelukken van den aanslag de bestorming zou hebben plaats gevonden. Hij legde mij uit, dat de Duitschers nu wel wisten, dat hun werk hier vooreerst moest mislukken. Wel zouden achter die tien, eenige honderdtallen gereed gestaan hebben, doch ze wisten wel uit ervaring, dat nu langs heel de linie onmiddellijk gewaarschuwd werd.

Zelf trok men ook niet vooruit, omdat men niet kon weten welke hinderlagen nog gelegd waren. 't Eenige wat te doen stond, was met lichtkogels den omtrek verkennen, een sluippatrouille uitzenden, en alle man in het geweer. Dit gebeurde dan ook. Ik wachtte nu maar op de terugkomst der sluippatrouille. Ik hoopte van hen nog eenig nieuws te zullen vernemen.

In afwachting luisterde ik naar de zaakkundige opmerkingen van mijn gastheer. ‘Zie.’ zeide hij onder meer, ‘zoo leven we nu hier, elk moment loopen we de kans van beslopen te worden, en dan in de lucht te vliegen.’ Dit, meende hij, was geen oorlogvoeren. ‘Telkens moeten we van die kleine aanvallen afslaan. Slapen doet men dan ook maar alleen wanneer het lichaam uitgeput is. Dit is gelukkig meestal het geval. Anders zou men, wetende aan welke gevaren men bloot staat, hier geen oog sluiten. Ons zenuwleven lijdt dan ook zeer. 't Is goed dat er onder ons mannen geen alcohol gedronken wordt, want dat zou ons de kalmte doen verliezen. Juist op het verliezen van ons evenwicht bouwt de vijand zijn hoop. Zouden we nu met een groot getal uit de loopgraaf zijn getrokken, wellicht zouden de anderen dan langs een anderen kant er in getrokken zijn. Doch zoo dom zijn we niet.’

Inderdaad lijkt mij dit leven zeer afmattend. Ik begon te meenen, dat de patrouille wel wat lang weg bleef. Doch mijn mentor legde mij uit, dat men voor iedere honderd meter wel een kwartier mocht rekenen, want 't moest alles kruipende gaan. De gestalten zouden rechtop gaande te goed een mikpunt zijn voor den vijand.

Plotseling, terwijl we nog spraken, hoorden we het geknetter van ettelijke geweren. Nu was men toch slaags geraakt, en wel met een patrouille der tegenpartij die eveneens op verkenning was. De Belgen waren alleen zoo gelukkig geweest het eerste de andere partij op te merken. Nu kwam er ook in en om de loopgraaf meer actie. Men verwachtte dat de aanval meer algemeen zou worden, en was dus op z'n hoede.

Doch een geruimen tijd ging voorbij, toen kwam de uitgezonden patrouille terug met drie dooden en eenige gewonden. Een mitrailleur met munitie was mede buitgemaakt en tien gevangenen had men meegebracht. De gewonden der tegenpartij had men moeten laten liggen met het oog op mogelijk gevaar. Hoe hard men dit zelf vond, men had al eerder leergeld betaald.

Toen ik in den vroegen morgen met de gevangenen gesproken had, werd 't mij duidelijk waarom 't dien nacht gebleven was bij dit kleine voorval. De reden was zeer eenvoudig. Men had langs dien kant niet zoo veel mannetjes, en de positie der verbondenen was te sterk, om ze met een kleine macht aan te vallen. Er was nog een reden, doch die vischte ik slechts op uit de gesprekken der gevangenen. Men vecht liever niet bij nacht en op kleinen afstand tegen de Belgen. Hun bajonetten zijn lang, en ze weten er vaardig mee om te gaan.


Personalia Izak Samson (1872-1928)
Een van de Nederlandse verslaggevers die indertijd voor verschillende bladen vanaf het front als ooggetuige verslag gedaan van de gruwelen van de oorlog was Izak Samson. Hij was in de loop van zijn leven behalve als journalist, ook werkzaam als diamantbewerker, vertegenwoordiger in alcoholvrij bier en boekhandelaar.
Izak Samson was een overtuigd socialist en anti-militairist en schreef voor Het Volk, het Algemeen Handelsblad en Het Nieuws van den Dag.
De op deze website gepubliceerde stukken van Samson zijn afkomstig uit Brieven, indrukken en beschouwingen door een neutraal journalist aan het Westfront der Geallieerden gedurende de jaren 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917 (Amsterdam 1917).


http://www.wereldoorlog1418.nl/ooggetuigen-eerste-wereldoorlog/samson-nacht-loopgraven.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 18:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ethel Clayton, Motion Picture Magazine Cover [United States] (February 1915)



http://www.magazine-covers.net/t4725773/ethel-clayton/motion-picture-magazine-united-states-february-1915-magazine-cover.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 18:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Card from 2nd Lt Albert Brainerd Raynes, 23rd February 1915



http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/item/5871?CISOBOX=1&REC=2
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 18:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Killingbeck Hospital, New Ward



23rd February 1915: View of new ward, built with a covered verandah (still under construction). This was used to treat patients with tuberculosis, it was thought that exposure to the air aided recovery.

http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/09405/F0C03030E06534581D180D81435D733256C8A8D0.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 19:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

French Society of Agriculture

The French Society of Agriculture was found in 1761 by the King Louis XV who named it « Société d’Agriculture de la Généralité de Paris ». The 23 February 1915 it became “l’Académie d’Agriculture de France”.

The Academy purpose is to have a direct contact with the public opinion and to prepare original propositions on the national and international fields. Its competences cover agriculture, fishing, sea farming, but also food and industrial products, machinery, environment, rural life…as for their scientific, technical, legal, political and social aspects.

http://www.academie-agriculture.fr/description-anglaise.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 19:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Chorley Well Represented at Accrington Pals Service
Monday, 21st February, 2011

Chorley was well represented at the Accrington Pals valedictory service held at St. John’s Church, Accrington on Sunday, 20th February.

It commemorated the 96th anniversary of the Accrington Pals Battalion leaving Lancashire on the 23rd February 1915, to go off to war.

http://www.chorleypalsmemorial.org.uk/?p=2168
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 19:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hugo von Pohl



Hugo von Pohl (August 25, 1855 – 23 February 1916) was a German admiral who during the First World War commanded the German High Seas Fleet from 1915 until shortly before his death from illness in 1916.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_von_Pohl
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 19:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Enrico Caruso - O Holy Night (1916 in original French)

The only Christmas song recorded by Caruso (from the 23rd February 1916).
"O Holy Night" ("Cantique de Noël") is a Christmas carol composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem "Minuit, chrétiens" by Placide Cappeau (1808-1877), a wine merchant and poet. Cappeau was asked to write a Christmas poem by a parish priest. It has become a standard modern carol for solo performance with an operatic finish.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hv5t7pOs4vc
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 19:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Douglas Reynolds



Douglas Reynolds VC (20 September 1882 - 23 February 1916) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Educated at Cheltenham College. He was 31 years old, and a Captain in the 37th Bty., Royal Field Artillery, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 26 August 1914 at Le Cateau, France, Captain Reynolds took up two teams with volunteer drivers, to recapture two British guns and limbered up two guns under heavy artillery and infantry fire. Although the enemy was within 100 yards he managed, with the help of two drivers (Job Henry Charles Drain and Frederick Luke), to get one gun away safely. On 9 September at Pysloup, he reconnoitred at close range, discovered a battery which was holding up the advance and silenced it.

Reynolds later achieved the rank of Major, but was wounded in action, and died in the Duchess of Westminster's hospital in Le Touquet, France, on 23 February 1916.

Major Reynolds is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery in Northern France, while his Victoria Cross is displayed at the Royal Artillery Museum in Woolwich, London.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Reynolds
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 19:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Punch Magazine (23rd February, 1916)



http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWzeppelinF.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Edgar Algernon Robert Cecil, Viscount Cecil of Chelwood (1864-1958)



(...) Fifty years old at the outbreak of World War I and too old for military service, Cecil went to work for the Red Cross. Following the formation of the 1915 coalition government, he became Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs on 30 May 1915. He served in this post until 10 January 1919, additionally serving in the cabinet as Minister of Blockade between 23 February 1916 and 18 July 1918. He was responsible for devising procedures to bring economic and commercial pressure against the enemy. (...)

http://www.answers.com/topic/robert-cecil-1st-viscount-cecil-of-chelwood
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letters from Tsar Nicholas to Tsaritsa Alexandra - February 1917

Stavka. 23 February, 1917

MY BELOVED SUNNY,

Sincerest thanks for your dear letter, which you left in my coupé. I read it with avidity before going off to sleep. It was a great comfort to me in my loneliness, after spending two months together. If I could not hear your sweet voice, at least I could console myself with these lines of your tender love. I did not go out once till we came here. I am feeling much better to-day - there is no hoarseness and the cough is not so bad. - The day was sunny and cold and I was met by the usual public (people], with Alexeiev at the head. He is really looking very well, and on his face there is a calm expression, such as I have not seen for a long time. We had a good talk together for about half an hour. After that I put my room in order and got your telegram telling me of Olga and Baby having measles. I could not believe my eyes-this news was so unexpected. Especially after his own telegram, in which he says that he is feeling well. In any case, it is very tiresome and disturbing for you, my darling. Perhaps you will cease to receive so many people? You have a legitimate excuse - fear of transmitting the infection to their families.

In the 1st and 2nd Cadet Corps the number of boys ill with measles is increasing steadily. At dinner I saw all the foreign generals-they were very sorry to hear this sad news.

Here in the house it is so still; no noise, no excited shouts! I imagine him sleeping - all his little things, photographs and knick-knacks, in exemplary order in his bedroom and in the room with the round window!

Ne nado! On the other hand, what luck that he did not come here with me now, only to get ill and lie here in our little bedroom! God grant that the measles may pass without complications; it would be so much better if all the children fell ill with it at the same tim!

I greatly miss my half-hourly game of patience every evening. I shall take up dominoes again in my spare time. - The stillness round here depresses me, of course, when I am not working. - Old Ivanov was amiable and charming at dinner. My other neighbour was Sir H. Williams, who is delighted at having met so many of his compatriots here lately.

You write about my being firm - a master; that is quite right. Be assured that I do not forget; but it is not necessary to snap at people right and left every minute. A quiet, caustic remark or answer is often quite sufficient to show a person his place.

Well, my dear, it is getting late. Good-night. May God bless your sleep...

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/letters/february17.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Russian Revolution

The beginnings of the Russian Revolution did not have a specific goal. On 23 February 1917, workers simply took to the streets of Petrograd to complain about shortages of food. In a matter of days, most local shops and factories had shut down to join the protest. Soldiers and police officers eventually joined the protest, and all attempts to restore civil order were crushed. On the first few days of March 1917, Nicholas II abdicated and was quickly replaced by a Provisional Government put together by the Duma Socialist Party.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-was-the-russian-revolution.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Butte de Warlencourt


Australian official correspondent and later official historian, Charles Bean, and Private Arthur Bazley (left rear) examine German trenches captured
by Australian soldiers at the ‘Maze’ near Le Sars, France, before the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in February 1917.


All winter the men of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) gazed at the Butte from their trench lines forward of Flers and Le Sars. Regular patrols in no–man’s–land had examined German positions hereabouts, looking forward to spring, when the offensive would supposedly begin again. On the night of 23 February 1917, Australian patrols near the Butte reported that much coughing and talking could be heard from the German lines, as well as the firing of rifle grenades and flares. Later in the night there was more firing of machine–guns and sniper fire, but all was obscured by dense fog. On the next night, a patrol forward from the line held by the 9th Battalion (Queensland) crept towards the village of La Barque, visible to the north–east of the Butte. They found the enemy frontline trench deserted, finding nothing more dangerous there than a black cat! A message telling of the empty trench went to headquarters in code and simple French—‘Bon, bon, très bon’.

http://www.ww1westernfront.gov.au/warlencourt/index.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

23. February 1918. Estonia, Pärnu - declaration of independence



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Declaration_of_Estonian_independence_in_P%C3%A4rnu.jpg
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Suicide in the Trenches

(published in the Cambridge Magazine, 23 February 1918)

I knew a simple soldier boy
Who grinned at life in empty joy,
Slept soundly through the lonesome dark,
And whistled early with the lark.

In winter trenches, cowed and glum
With crumps and lice and lack of rum,
He put a bullet through his brain.
No one spoke of him again.

You smug-faced crowds with kindling eye
Who cheer when soldier lads march by,
Sneak home and pray you'll never know
The hell where youth and laughter go.


Siegfried Sassoon

http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/sassoon.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16026
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Feb 2011 20:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Defender of the Fatherland Day

Defender of the Fatherland Day is a popular Russian holiday on February 23, although the date itself has no major historical significance in Russia. The day focuses on the achievements of military forces and veterans.

(...) The reasons behind celebrating Defender of the Fatherland Day on February 23 are unclear, as the date does not coincide with any historical event. Russia first celebrated this day in 1922 as the fourth anniversary of the Red Army. However, Russian leader Vladimir Lenin signed a decree for the creation of a Bolshevik Army on a different date (January 15, 1918). In 1938, Soviet history books started claiming that the Red Army won an important victory over German invaders on February 23, 1918, but no independent sources supported this claim. The Russian Parliament voted to remove it from the holiday’s history in 2006.

Between 1936 and 1990, February 23 was observed as the Soviet Army and Navy Day. It became a workday in 1991. The Russian parliament reintroduced it as a public holiday in 2002, after renaming it as Defender of the Fatherland Day.

http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/russia/fatherland-defender
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group