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18 Februari

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2006 8:07    Onderwerp: 18 Februari Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 18. Februar

1914

1915
64000 Russen gefangen
Deutscher Sieg bei Plock-Racionz
Der Kaiser über den Sieg in der Winterschlacht in den Masuren
Einmarsch österreichisch-ungarischer Truppen in Czernowitz
Untergang eines deutschen Luftschiffes
Tod des "Blücher" Kommandanten Erdmann

1916
Die Engländer bei Ypern blutig abgewiesen
Kavaja südlich Durazzo besetzt
Englische Niederlage am Tigris
Englische Niederlage in Ostafrika
Die Besatzung von Kamerun auf Fernando Po

1917
Starke englische Angriffe zurückgewiesen
Die Russen im Oitoz-Tal zurückgeschlagen

1918
Wieder ein Flugzeug über London
Wiederbeginn der Feindseligkeiten an der großrussischen Front
Vormarsch auf Dünaburg und in Richtung Kowel
Ein großer englischer Passagierdampfer versenkt
Der Vorstoß deutscher Torpedoboote in den Ärmelkanal

www.stahlgewitter.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2006 8:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

February 18

1913 Raymond Poincare becomes president of France

Raymond Poincare, a conservative politician who had been elected president of the French Republic over the objections of Georges Clemenceau and the French Left a month earlier, takes office on this day in 1913.

Known for his right-wing nationalist beliefs and his strong Catholic faith, Poincare served as France’s prime minister and foreign secretary before being elected to the presidency. A native of France’s Lorraine region, lost to Germany in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71, he bitterly hated and feared Germany. As prime minister in the years before World War I, Poincare worked to strengthen France’s alliances with both Britain and Russia. While Poincare was convinced that the system of alliances in Europe would preserve the balance of power and avert a war, in reality the solidification of the Triple Entente (an alliance among France, Britain and Russia) in the years before 1914 made Germany increasingly nervous and only intensified the atmosphere of tension that would soon explode into world war.

During the war, Poincare fought to keep a spirit of strong national unity alive and urged France’s military and civilian population alike to stand firm against the onslaught of the German enemy. In the spirit of this unity, Poincare appointed his liberal nemesis, Georges Clemenceau, as prime minister in 1917. Though the two men despised each other, they shared a hard-line attitude towards Germany and fought together for strong penalties for the losing nations at the Versailles peace conference, held in Paris in 1919.

Angered by what he saw as excessive leniency towards Germany in the final Versailles treaty, Poincare declined to stand for reelection and returned to the Senate in 1920. He was again appointed prime minister in 1922. In this post, he enforced the payment of German reparations; when the struggling country defaulted, he sent French troops to seize the industrial zones of the Ruhr Valley in January 1923. Poincare stepped down with the victory of a left-wing coalition in 1924, but returned to the post of prime minister in 1926. He would head two more ministries until 1929, when he retired from government service for health reasons. Poincare died in 1934.

www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE DEATH OF FRANK JAMES.

Kearney, Mo., Feb. 18. --- Frank JAMES died at the old SAMUELS home, three miles from Kearney, at 3:40 o'clock this afternoon, following a final stroke of apoplexy at 10 o'clock this morning. He was 73 years old. He had been ill all winter, suffering a first stroke last November.
The funeral will be held Saturday with burial in the family lot here, beside the graves of his mother, Mrs. Zerelda SAMUELS, and his 8-years-old half-brother, Archie, who was killed by a bomb tossed into the SAMUELS home by Pinkerton detectives searching for the JAMES brothers.
The body of Jesse JAMES, which now rests under the sod of the SAMUELS farm yard, probably will be disinterred and buried with the rest of the family.

"The Kansas City Times" (Missouri), Friday, February 19, 1915
http://boards.ancestry.co.uk/topics.crime.jesse-james/162/mb.ashx
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

18th February 1918 - CROPTHORNE MAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL

CROPTHORNE MAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL – Sergt Guise, a Cropthorne man, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He is an old soldier, early in life joining the Worcestershires and he spent several years in India. After seven years in the army he returned home a few months before the outbreak of war and started market gardening. Called up as a reservist he went to France with the First Expeditionary Force and has seen much hard fighting from Mons onward and has been wounded several times. He had been offered a commission, but at present prefers to remain an N.C.O.

http://www.ww1worcestershire.co.uk/key-dates/1918/02/cropthorne-man-wins-military-medal/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

SMS Bayern (1915)

SMS Bayern was the lead ship of the Bayern class of battleships of the German Imperial Navy. She was named for Bavaria, then a kingdom within the German Empire. The vessel was launched on 18 February 1915 and entered service in July 1916, too late to take part in the Battle of Jutland. Her main armament consisted of eight 38 cm (15 in) guns in four turrets, which was a significant improvement over the preceding König's ten 30.5 cm (12 inch) guns. The ship was to have formed the nucleus for a fourth battle squadron in the High Seas Fleet, along with three of her sister ships. However, only one of the other ships—Baden—was completed; the other two were canceled later in the war when production requirements shifted to U-boat construction.

Lees het hele artikel op http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMS_Bayern_(1915)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De temperatuur op 18 februari 1916 lag tussen 3.1 en 8.4°C en was gemiddeld 4.5°C. Er was 8.2 mm neerslag. Er was 0.9 uur zonneschijn (9%). De gemiddelde windsnelheid was 4 Bft (matige wind) en kwam overheersend uit het zuid-westen.

http://www.genealogieonline.nl/genealogie_beemer/I178.php
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

18 February 1916

The last German garrison in the Cameroons surrenders to the British general Sir Charles Dobell.

http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/1916

Charles Macpherson Dobell

Lieutenant-General Sir Charles Macpherson Dobell KCB, CMG, DSO (22 June 1869 – 17 October 1954) was a Canadian soldier who served with the Royal Welch Fusiliers of the British Army.

During World War I, he fought in the Cameroons and was later promoted to Lieutenant-General. He served with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign under General Sir Archibald Murray, but they were both replaced in 1917.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Macpherson_Dobell
Zie ook http://www.firstworldwar.com/bio/dobell.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The February 1917 revolution

From 18 February to 4 March, Russia was paralysed by strikes.

The strikes began at the Putilov steel works on 18 February. A total of 20 000 workers were locked out by their employers over a pay dispute. The next day, over 850 factories around Petrograd shut down and 90 000 workers joined the strike.

By 22 February, over half a million workers were protesting. Public transport stopped. Newspapers went out of print. The number of striking workers increased when rumours circulated of yet another cut in bread supplies.

The twenty-third of February was International Women's Day. Thousands of women took to the streets to march alongside the other disgruntled workers.

Lees het geheel op http://www.skwirk.com/p-c_s-56_u-427_t-1085_c-4192/the-february-revolution-1917-fall-of-the-romanovs/qld/sose-history/the-russian-revolution/towards-revolution
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Merrylees, John Innes, Diary, Egypt, 17-18 February 1917

Dear Ma, Just a line to let you know I have come through another terrible fight all right. No doubt you will have seen something about the fall of Jericho. Well that was the result of our attacks. We lost a lot of boys in the affair; 4 or 5 in my old company were laid out. A good job I am in A Co. now. I must have brought my luck with me because my old platoon suffered very badly, we had 4 hours continuous fight to get one hill but we made the old Turk run in the end. As a reward we are being half starved again. Bully & biscuits that's all & not much water. Still we hope for something better. It is still raining hard. We are nearly washed out of our levy. The other officers in my levy all soaked through. I am lucky today; I have had no letter or parcels for some time & have not seen a newspaper for ages. Suppose you are keeping all the reports about our doings for me. Some of the others show them to me sometimes. How are things at home? We heard that everything is being rationed, how do they do it & what do you get? Some men have just come to us from England & say things are not nearly so bad as made out to be. Is that right? We don't get any meat now, do you? I was in Jordan valley the other day. It's quite hot down there & very unhealthy about Jericho. There are swarms of flies. It's horrible. Have you heard from Harry lately? Is he alright? What are [?] doing now? Earning enough to keep the whole of us now I suppose. You should be pretty well off now. I am bankrupt at present waiting to hear that you have arranged my money affairs so that I can become solvent. How is the property? If any ofthe property becomes empty, the rent must be increased but not with the weekly houses as it is not allowed. A 32 pound note is worth 34 pounds now and so on. Well must say good bye now as the mails are being called for. Hope all are well. Much Love, Willie Received on the 20th May.

Nog meer op http://digitalcollections.mcmaster.ca/merrylees-john-innes-diary-17-18-february-1917
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

18 February 1918, Commons Sitting: GERMAN PRISONERS (KAISER'S BIRTHDAY).

Major HUNT asked the Prime Minister whether he is aware that the German flag was lately hoisted at the German prisoners' camp at Sandhill Park, Somerset, on the Kaiser's birthday; and whether he is aware that this was resented by the men guarding the camp and by the inhabitants of the district; and, as the Union Jack is not allowed to be hoisted in Germany, will he take steps to prevent this sort of thing happening again in this country?

Mr. MACPHERSON No, Sir; my hon. and gallant Friend is misinformed. The German flag has never been hoisted at Sandhill Park, Somerset.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1918/feb/18/german-prisoners-kaisers-birthday
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

T. E. Lawrence, The Battle of Seil el-Hasa
Arab Bulletin No 79, 18 February 1918


Tafila, January 26

A Turkish temporary regiment, commanded by Hamid Fakhri Bey, acting G.O.C. 48th Division, and composed of 3/151, 1/152, a murettab battalion of 150, with a company of gendarmes, a detachment of 100 cavalry, two Austrian quick-firing mountain guns, and twenty-three machine guns, was railed to Kalaat el-Hasa station on January 19, and left Kerak on January 23 to retake Tafila. The troops had been hurriedly collected from the Hauran and Amman commands, and came forward from Kerak short of supplies, and leaving no food and few men there.

On January 24, they came in contact in the afternoon with our patrols in Seil el-Hasa, and by night had driven them back into Tafila. The Sherifian officers had laid out a defensive position on the south bank of the great valley in which Tafila stands, and Sherif Zeid left for this about midnight, taking with him the sixty regulars and 400 irregulars (Ageyl, Bisha, Muteir) who had come with him from Akaba. The Sherifian baggage marched away at the same time towards Buseira, and everybody thought that we were running away. I think we were.

Tafila of course panicked, and as Diab el-Auran (the busy-bodied sheikh) had given us ominous reports of the disaffection and treachery of the villagers, I went down from my house before dawn into the crowded streets, to listen to what was being said. There was much free criticism of the Sherif distinctly disrespectful, but no disloyalty. Everyone was screaming with terror, goods were being bundled out of the houses into the streets, which were packed with women and men. Mounted Arabs were galloping up and down, firing wildly into the air, and the flashes of the Turkish rifles were outlining the further cliffs of the Tafila gorge. Just at dawn the enemy bullets began to fall in the olive gardens, and I went out to Sherif Zeid and persuaded him to send Abdullah Effendi (the machine gunner and the junior of our two officers) with two fusils mitrailleurs to support the peasants who were still holding the northern crest. His arrival stimulated them to a counter-attack in which they drove the Turkish cavalry back over the near ridge, across a small plain to the first of the low ridges falling into Wadi el-Hasa. He took this ridge also, and was there held up, as the Turkish main body was posted just behind it. The fighting became very hot, with huge bursts of Turkish machine-gun fire and a good deal of shelling.

Zeid hesitated to send forward reinforcements, so I went up to Abdullah's position (about seven miles north of Tafila) to report. On my way I met him returning, having had five men killed and one gun put out of action, and having finished his ammunition. We sent back urgent messages to Zeid to send forward a mountain gun, any available machine guns, and what men he could collect, to a reserve position, which was the southern end of the little plain between the Hasa valley and the Tafila valley. This plain is triangular, about two miles each way. The opening lay to the north, and was a low pass, through which the Kerak road ran, and up which the Turks were coming. The sides of the triangle were low ridges, and Abdullah's charge had taken all the western ridge.

After Abdullah had gone I went up to the front, and found things rather difficult. It was being held by thirty Ibn Jazi Howeitat, mounted, and about thirty villagers. The Turks were working through the pass, and along the eastern boundary ridge of the plain, and concentrating the fire of about fifteen machine guns on the face and flank of the rather obvious little mound we were holding. They were meanwhile correcting the fusing of their shrapnel, which had been grazing the hill-top and bursting over the plain, and were beginning to sprinkle the sides and top of the hill quite freely. Our people were short of ammunition, and the loss of the position was obviously only a matter of minutes. A Turkish aeroplane came up and did not improve our chances.

The Motalga horsemen were given all the cartridges we could collect, and the footmen ran back over the plain. I was among them, since I had come straight up the cliffs from Tafila, and my animals had not caught me up. The mounted men held out for fifteen minutes more, and then galloped back to us unhurt. We collected in the reserve position, a ridge about sixty feet high, commanding an excellent view of the plain. It was now noon, we had lost about fifteen men and had about eighty left, but a few minutes later about 120 Ageyl came up, and my men with a Hotchkiss automatic, and Lutfi el-Aseli with two. We then held our own easily till 3 p.m. when Sherifs Zeid and Mastur came up with Rasim and Abdullah, one Egyptian army 2.95 mountain gun, two Vickers, two large Hotchkiss, and five fusils mitrailleurs, with twenty mule M.I., thirty Motalga horse, and about 200 villagers. The Turks were trying to shell and machine-gun our ridge, but found difficulty in ranging. They had occupied our old front line, and we had its range (3,100 yards) exactly, as I had paced it on my way back (this mountain country is very difficult to judge by eye). We mounted all our materials on our ridge, and Rasim took all the mounted men (now about eighty) to the right, to work up beyond the eastern boundary ridge. He was able to get forward unseen, till he had turned the Turkish flank at 2,000 yards. He there made a dismounted attack of ten men and five fusils mitrailleurs, keeping his horse in reserve. Meanwhile the Turks had just five Maxims and four automatics on the western ridge of the pass, and opened on our centre. We replied with Vickers and Hotchkiss, and put twenty-two rounds of shrapnel over the face of the mound. A reinforcement of 100 men from Aima now reached us (they had refused Sherifian service the day before over a question of wages, but sunk old scores in the crisis), and we sent them, with three Hotchkiss automatics, to our left flank. They crept down behind the western ridge of the plain till within 200 yards of the Turkish Maxims, without being seen, as we opened across the plain a frontal attack of eighteen men, two Vickers, and two large Hotchkiss. The ridge was a flint one, and the Turks could not entrench on it, as we had found in the morning; the ricochets were horrible. They lost many men, and our left flank were finally able by a sudden burst of fire to wipe out the Turkish machine-gunners and rush the guns. The mounted men then charged the retreating Turks from our right flank, while we sent forward the infantry and the banners in the centre. They occupied the Turkish line at sunset, and chased the enemy back past their guns into the bed of Wadi Hasa; where their cavalry in reserve put up a check that was not passed till dark. Our people mostly gave up the pursuit at this point (we had had no food since the day before, and the cold was pitiful) but the Bedouins of Kerak took it up and harried the flying mob all night.

Our losses were about twenty-five killed and forty wounded. The Ibn Jazi Howeitat, under Hamad el-Arar, did splendidly, and the villagers were very steady and good.

http://telawrence.net/telawrencenet/works/articles_essays/1918_battle_of_seil_el-Hasa.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:53    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

18 February 1918

The first American fighter squadron, the 95th Aero (Pursuit) Squadron, arrives in France.

http://www.century-of-flight.net/Aviation%20history/aviation%20timeline/1918.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2010 22:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

18 February 1919, Commons Sitting: 1914–15 STAR.

Major BLAIR asked the Secretary of State for War when the general issue of the Mons medal is to be made?

Captain GUEST The general issue of the 1914 Star has already commenced, 716 and the stars for the personnel of twenty-four regiments have been dispatched to their respective record offices for disposal. The distribution will be proceeded with methodically until the complete issue has been effected.

Lieutenant-Colonel McCALMONT asked the Secretary of State for War whether he is aware of the desire on the part of the recipients of either medal to have the ribbon of the 1914 Star distinguished from that of the 1914–15 Star; and whether, failing any better distinction, the possibility of ordering the former to be worn with precedence over the general war medal and the latter after the war medal will be considered?

Captain GUEST The question of a distinction being made between the ribands of the 1914 Star and the 1914–1915 Star is at present under consideration.

Sir F. HALL asked the Secretary for War if he is aware that the decoration of the 1915 star awarded for active service in 1914–15 on the various fronts has been given to the Royal Medical Corps serving in Egypt and has been withheld from those similarly serving Malta; whether Malta was one of the principal hospital bases for Gallipoli; whether Egypt also was a hospital base for wounded evacuated from Gallipoli; if the personnel serving at the base hospitals in France received this decoration; and if he will state what are the grounds that led to this difference?

Captain GUEST The question of whether Malta should be considered to be a theatre of war in so far as the award of the "1914–15 Star" is concerned is at present under consideration.

Sir F. HALL Is not the point as I indicated in my question, and, if so, when can we get a reply on the subject?

Captain GUEST I think at a very early date.

Sir F. HALL I will repeat it in a fortnight's time and perhaps the right hon. Gentleman will be able to answer then.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/feb/18/1914-15-star
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2011 22:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

WarChron - February 1915 - East Prussia - Poland - Galacia

On 18 February, on the Northwest Front, the German 10th Army was pushing closer to Grodno. General von Pappritz's German forces seized Tauroggen. Violent snowstorms alternating with thaws made roads almost impassable with mud and floods.

On the Southwest Front, the Austro-Hungarian 4th Army opened an offensive against the Russian 3rd Army on the Dunajec River near Tarnow.

On 18 February, on the Caucasian Front, Turkish troops began the massacre of Armenian civilians, as some had provided assistance to the Russians.

http://www.warchron.com/eastPrussiaPolandGalacia.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2011 22:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from Sigmund Freud to Karl Abraham, February 18, 1915

Vienna IX, Berggasse 19
18 February 1915

Dear Friend,

(...) It is pleasing that all goes well with you again. It is the same with us, apart from small troubles. Martin is writing assiduously from his anonymous abode in Galicia, and greatly praises his condition; he is now in a ruined castle somewhere, quartered with German infantry. Ernst is kept under strict discipline in the training school in Klagenfurt; Oli, the last remaining one, will be called up on 3 March, but will probably volunteer beforehand for a rifle battalion. He would prefer to go into a railway regiment as a qualified technician, but cannot find a way in. (...)

http://www.pep-web.org/document.php?id=zbk.052.0297a
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2011 22:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

the futurist synthetic theatre
by f.t. marinetti, emilio settimelli, bruno corra - 18th february 1915

As we await our much prayed-for great war, we Futurists carry our violent antineutralist action from city square to university and back again, using our art to prepare the Italian sensibility for the great hour of maximum danger. Italy must be fearless, eager, as swift and elastic as a fencer, as indifferent to blows as a boxer, as impassive at the news of a victory that may have cost fifty-thousand dead as at the news of a defeat.

For Italy to learn to make up its mind with lightning speed, to hurl itself into battle, to sustain every undertaking and every possible calamity, books and reviews are unnecessary. They interest and concern only a minority, are more or less tedious, obstructive, and relaxing. They cannot help chilling enthusiasm, aborting impulses, and poisoning with doubt a people at war. War--Futurism intensified--obliges us to march and not to rot [marciare, non marcire] in libraries and reading rooms. THEREFORE WE THINK THAT THE ONLY WAY TO INSPIRE ITALY WITH THE WARLIKE SPIRIT TODAY IS THROUGH THE THEATRE. In fact ninety percent of Italians go to the theatre, whereas only ten percent read books and reviews. But what is needed is a FUTURIST THEATRE, completely opposed to the passeist theatre that drags its monotonous, depressing processions around the sleepy Italian stages.

Not to dwell on the historical theatre, a sickening genre already abandoned by the passeist public, we condemn the whole contemporary theatre because it is too prolix, analytic, pedantically psychological, explanatory, diluted, finicking, static, as full of prohibitions as a police station, as cut up into cells as a monastery, as moss-grown as an old abandoned house. In other words it is a pacifistic, neutralist theatre, the antithesis of the fierce, overwhelming, synthesizing velocity of the war.

Lees verder op http://www.391.org/manifestos/19150218marinetti.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Feb 2011 22:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Map showing submarine warfare zone around the United Kingdom, declared by Germany on February 18 1915.

Doorklikken als het u belieft. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:German_Submarine_Zone_February_1915_SGW_Vol_V.png
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Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 18 Feb 2019 9:15, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Diary of Arthur L. Linfoot - 58th Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C.

18 February 1918; Monday
Up about 7.30. Had a bath in the morning. On fatigue in the afternoon. Wrote letter home at night. Fritz* over bombing.
Billy Truman went on leave. Got down to bed early.

* Fritz: a name given to German troops by the British and others in the First and Second World Wars.

https://www.arthurlinfoot.org.uk/2018/02/18/18-february-1918-monday/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

PREMIER T.J. RYAN POLICY SPEECH 18TH FEBRUARY 1918
03 NOV 2014|ROBYN HAMILTON

State Library recently digitised the 1918 Policy Speech of Thomas Joseph Ryan, Premier of Queensland from 1915-1919.

Mr. Ryan had sailed north to Townsville in the S.S. Bingera for the purpose of delivering the speech in Townsville on the 18th February 1918. An unprecedented number of people greeted his arrival, and after an informal reception at the Queen’s Hotel, the Premier, escorted by the Mayor Alderman Clegg, proceeded to the Town Hall for a formal civic reception with a number of town dignitaries. In responding to the Mayor’s toast to his health, the Premier pointed out that he had come to Townsville to deliver his Policy Speech because he ‘recognised the importance of the city as the capital of North Queensland, and as one of the most important ports in the whole of Australia’. The Premier delivered his Policy Speech in the Theatre Royal that evening.

Premier Ryan’s speech covered a wide range of government interests and concerns – the recent floods, infrastructure development, agriculture and forestry, the mining industry, and state owned enterprises, from stations, butchers and fisheries to sawmills and banks. In commenting on the Great War, the Premier also covered repatriation initiatives, and the issue of war profiteering.

State Library of Queensland, http://blogs.slq.qld.gov.au/ww1/2014/11/03/digitisedslq-premier-t-j-ryan-policy-speech-18th-february-1918/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

David J. Castleman cablegram to Mary Pride Jones, 18 February 1918

WESTERN UNION CABLEGRAM Form 2606
Newcomb Carlton, President George W.E. Atkins, First Vice-President
302 E 53 St., N.Y. [Phone?] [illegible] PLAZA
Received at 14 NY BB 25 France Feb 18th 1918
E FM Miss Pride Jones 104 East 52 Street NewYork
Letter January Thirteenth Received Faring Fine Moving Again Supplement Adress Head Quarters Department General Transportation Yours. Casoleman 1112 AM


http://www.virginiamemory.com/transcribe/items/show/3419
Het origineel bekijkt u hier: http://www.virginiamemory.com/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/3419/12096
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

REMEMBER: ON THIS DAY - 18 February 1918 Gnr George Thistlethwaite

17932 Gnr George Thistlethwaite, 226 Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

A farm labourer from Horton-in-Ribblesdale, Yorkshire, George enlisted into the 10th Bn Duke of Wellington's (W Riding) Regt (as 13592) at the age of 17 at Settle on 8 September 1914. He was, however, discharged with 'general debility' whilst at Frensham Camp after only 26 days service and returned to his usual civilian life until becoming a munitions worker in 1916.

In August 1917, George returned to the army after being conscripted into service and served with 226 SB of the RGA on the Western Front as from December 1917.

Severely wounded by counter-battery fire in February 1918, George died of wounds in the 3 Casualty Clearing Station on 18 February 1918 and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, West Flanders, Belgium.

http://westfrontassoc.mtcdevserver.com/great-war-people/remember-on-this-day/4513-18-february-1918-gnr-george-thistlethwaite.html#sthash.UYc91xNS.dpbs
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Borth WW1 1914-18 Commemoration Committee: Monthly News Fron Home And Abroad

18th February 1918
- Armistice terminates on Russian front. Hostilities resumed by German armies. Dvinsk taken by German forces.
- General Sir W. Robertson, Chief of the British Imperial General Staff, resigns

http://www.borthcommunity.info/images/stories/WW1DocsPictures/43-WW1-Monthly-News-February-1918-Extra-Extra.pdf
Ook hier: https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/battles/chronology-of-the-great-war/timeline-february-1918/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Whiz-Bangs Krumps and Coalboxes

18th February 1918 Monday
“I was relieved on the 18th, and went back to the 130th Field Ambulance at L’Estrade. I found them all comfortably situated in a big farm-house. Captain Burke and I shared an Armstrong Hut, and were very comfy.”

There were various developments of the Armstrong Hut. It was a hut usually constructed of wood. They could also have canvas sides and/or corrugated steel sides and roofing.

http://whiz-bangskrumpsandcoalboxes.co.uk/2018/02/18/18th-february-1918-monday/

Van deze site:

Colonel Thom took over as Director of Medical Services at this time. He was born in Madras, India in 1870, but subsequently educated in Scotland at Dollar Academy which was founded in 1818. He studied medicine at Edinburgh University and graduated in 1893 as M.B. and C.M. He signed up to the R.A.M.C. in 1894 and from 1900 spent time in South Africa during the South African Wars. He returned to India around 1903 where he remained for about ten years. At the outbreak of the Great War he was back in Scotland training field ambulances at Bridge of Allan until 1915 when he was sent to Gallipoli. Here he managed the overseeing of removing wounded men from the beaches onto the hospital ships for which he was awarded the C.M.G.

He was recalled to the War Office and then became ADMS 32nd Division and DDMS 2nd Army Corps on the Western Front, for which he was further decorated with a C.B.

Almost three months after the Armistice he was sent out to Archangel to oversee all medical services. His area of responsibility was immense, being in charge of both Murmansk and Archangel fronts wherever Allied troops were operating. Despite there being a serious threat not only from the Bolsheviks but also from serious disease such as cholera, dysentery and smallpox, no serious outbreaks apart from dysentery occurred. For his work in Russia he was given a C.B.E.

Following his return to the UK and the War Office he became ADMS of Home Counties (West). Appointed Superintendent of the Royal Edinburgh Infirmary he died on 7thApril 1935.

http://whiz-bangskrumpsandcoalboxes.co.uk/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

T. E. Lawrence Society - 18 FEBRUARY 1917

Two weeks after meeting Lawrence in Cairo, Colonel Bremond
arrived in Wejh to see Feisal. Having been briefed by Lawrence, Feisal was able to counter Bremond’s advances, so that …

“… when Bremond came after ten days and opened his heart, or part of it, to Feisal, his tactics were returned to him with improvements …

“Bremond referred gallantly to the question of Akaba, and the real danger to the Arabs in the Turks remaining there: insisting that the British, who had the means for an expedition thither, should be pressed to undertake it. Feisal, in reply, gave him a geographical sketch of the land behind
Akaba (I recognized the less dashing part of it myself) and explained the tribal difficulties and the food problem — all the points which made it a serious obstacle. He ended by saying that, after the cloud of orders, counter-orders and confusion over the allied troops for Rabegh, he really had not the face to approach Sir Archibald Murray so soon with another request for an excursion.

“Bremond had to retire from the battle in good order.”


Events of 18 February 1917 as recounted by T. E. Lawrence in Seven
Pillars of Wisdom
(1926).

Satisfied that Bremond was repulsed for a while, two days later Lawrence returned to Cairo again.

http://www.telsociety.org.uk/18-february-1017/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diagram of the 2nd Division operations at the Actions of Miraumont 17-18 February 1917

Klik even door... https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Actions_of_Miraumont_17-18_February_1917.png

Hoort hierbij:

Actions of Miraumont, 17–18 February

As a preliminary to capturing the Loupart Wood line (Riegel I Stellung), Gough intended the Fifth Army to continue the process of small advances in the Ancre valley, by attacking Hill 130, the Butte de Warlencourt, Gueudecourt, Serre and Miraumont, before attacking the Loupart Wood line three days before the Third Army offensive at Arras. The capture of Hill 130, would command the southern approach to Miraumont and Pys, exposing German artillery positions behind Serre to ground observation, while attacks on the north bank took ground overlooking Miraumont from the west, possibly inducing the Germans to withdraw voluntarily and uncover Serre. II Corps planned to attack on 17 February with the 2nd, 18th and 63rd divisions, on a 3,000 yd (1.7 mi; 2.7 km) front. With the ground still frozen, assembly trenches could not be dug, so it was decided that the troops would assemble in the open for the attack.[20]

The artillery of II Corps began a destructive and wire-cutting bombardment on 14 February, using the new fuze 106 against the German wire, which proved an effective wire-cutter, although fog and mist made aiming and observation of the results difficult. At zero hour, four siege groups were to begin a bombardment of rear lines and machine-gun nests and four counter-battery groups were to neutralise German artillery within range of the attack.[e] Artillery tactics were based on the experience of 1916, with a creeping barrage fired by half of the 18-pounders, beginning 200 yd (180 m) in front of the infantry and moving at 100 yd (91 m) in three minutes. Other 18-pounders searched and swept the area from the German trenches to 250 yd (230 m) further back in succession, as the British infantry reached and attacked them. The rest of the 18-pounders fired standing barrages on each line of trenches, until the creeping barrage arrived then lifted with it. A protective barrage was then formed beyond the objective, according to the barrage timetable.[20]

A thaw set in on 16 February and next dawn, there were dark clouds overhead and mist on the ground, which turned soft and slippery before reverting to deep mud. The speed of the creeping barrage had been based on the infantry crossing frozen ground and was too fast for the conditions. At 4:30 a.m. the German artillery bombarded the front from which the British were to attack, apparently alerted by a captured document and a deserter.[22] The German bombardment caused many casualties as the British infantry assembled but no retaliatory fire was opened, in the hope that the German artillery would not be provoked. The subsidiary attack on the right flank, on Desire Support and Guard trenches south of Pys, by a 6th Brigade battalion of the 2nd Division, disappeared into the dark until 9:00 a.m., when it was reported that the attackers had been repulsed; British casualties and daylight made a resumption of the attack impossible. The effect of the failure on the right affected the operation further west by the 99th Brigade of the 2nd Division and the 54th and 53rd brigades of the 18th Division, which attacked the high ground from the right-hand Courcelette–Miraumont road, to the Albert–Arras railway line in the Ancre valley.

The divisional boundary was west of the western road from Courcelette to Miraumont, the 99th Brigade attacking on a 700 yd (640 m) front, with boundaries marked by the two sunken roads. The 54th Brigade had a front which sloped steeply to the left and included Boom Ravine (Baum Mulde), with both brigades vulnerable to flanking fire from the right. The 53rd Brigade on the left of the attack had a wider front, much of which was also exposed to fire from the positions on the north bank that were due to be attacked by the 63rd Division and was to consolidate at the second objective. The main attack had three objectives, the first about 600 yd (550 m) forward along the southern slope of Hill 130, the second at South Miraumont Trench required an advance of another 600 yd (550 m) to the north slope of Hill 130 on the right and the railway between Grandcourt and Miraumont on the western flank; the final objective was the southern fringe of Petit Miraumont.[23]

Each brigade attacked with two battalions, the 99th Brigade with two companies to extend the defensive flank formed on the right with the subsidiary attack and ​2 1⁄2 companies following on to leapfrog through to the final objective. In the 18th Division area the 54th Brigade attacked with an extra company, to capture dugouts up to Boom Ravine and consolidate the first objective, while the 53rd Brigade formed a defensive flank on the left. Artillery support came from the divisional artillery, army field brigades and the neighbouring Australian corps.[f] The creeping and standing barrages began at 5:45 a.m. and the infantry advanced against a sparse German artillery reply. The German infantry proved alert and inflicted many casualties with small-arms fire, which with the darkness, fog and a sea of mud slowed the advance and caused units to become disorganised. The 99th Brigade reached the first objective and established a defensive flank against German counter-attacks but the 54th Brigade found uncut wire at Grandcourt Trench and lost the barrage while looking for gaps. The German garrison was able to emerge from cover and engage the British infantry, holding them up on the right. The left-hand battalion found more gaps but had so many casualties that it was also held up. On the 53rd Brigade front, Grandcourt Trench was captured quickly but the advance was held up at Coffee Trench by more uncut wire.[25]

The Germans in Boom Ravine were engaged from the flank and three machine-guns silenced, before the advance in the centre resumed and infantry found their way through the wire at Coffee Trench and captured it by 6:10 a.m. Boom Ravine was eventually captured at 7:45 a.m. and the advance resumed, a long way behind the creeping barrage and the line outside Petit Miraumont was attacked. The 99th Brigade attack on the right, advanced towards the second objective but was much hampered by the fog and mud. The failure to maintain the defensive flank on the right left the Germans free to rake the brigade with machine-gun fire from the right, which caused more casualties. South Miraumont Trench was entered by a small number of troops, who were then forced back to the first objective. Fresh German troops also counter-attacked from Petit Miraumont and the railway bank to the west Many of the British troops had weapons clogged with mud and fell back, the troops on the right forming a defensive flank along West Miraumont road, where they were fired on from South Miraumont Trench behind its left flank and withdrew to a line 100 yd (91 m) north of Boom Ravine. The attack had not reached its furthest objectives but had advanced the line 500 yd (460 m) on the right, 1,000 yd (910 m) in the centre and 800 yd (730 m) on the left. Boom Ravine was captured but the Germans had retained Hill 130 and inflicted 118 casualties on the 6th Brigade, 779 casualties on the 99th Brigade of the 2nd Division and 1,189 casualties in the 18th Division, a total of 2,207 British casualties.[25]

On the north bank, the 63rd Division attacked with the 188th Brigade and two battalions of the 189th Brigade, to capture 700 yd (640 m) of the road north from Baillescourt Farm towards Puisieux, to gain observation over Miraumont and form a defensive flank on the left, back to the existing front line. Two battalions attacked with a third battalion ready on the right flank to reinforce them or to co-operate with the 18th Division between the Ancre and the Miraumont road. On the northern flank two infantry companies, engineers and pioneers were placed to establish the defensive flank on the left. The divisional artillery and an army field brigade with fifty-four 18-pounder field guns and eighteen 4.5-inch howitzers provided fire support, with three field batteries from the 62nd Division further north, to place a protective barrage along the northern flank. The darkness, fog and mud were as bad as on the south bank but the German defence was far less effective. The creeping barrage moved at 100 yd (91 m) in four minutes, slower than the rate on the south bank and the Germans in a small number of strong points were quickly overcome. The objective was reached by 6:40 a.m. and the defensive flank established, a final German strongpoint being captured at 10:50 a.m. No German counter-attack was made until next day, which was stopped by artillery-fire. The 63rd Division lost 549 casualties and the three divisions took 599 prisoners.[26]

The sudden thaw, fog and unexpected darkness interfered with wire-cutting, slowed the infantry, who fell behind the barrage and the apparent betrayal of the attack forewarned the German defenders, who were able to contain the attack and inflict considerable casualties.[26] Troops were ordered to edge forward during the next few days, wherever German resistance was slight but the failure to capture Hill 130 and persistent fog, left the British overlooked and unable accurately to bombard German positions. Further deliberate attacks intended on Crest Trench were made impossible by a downpour which began on 20 February. Edging forward continued in the 2nd Division area, which had gained 100 yd (91 m) since 19 February. From 10 January – 22 February the Germans had been pushed back 5 mi (8.0 km) on a 4 mi (6.4 km) front.[27] The Action of Miraumont forced the Germans to begin their withdrawal from the Ancre valley before the planned retirement to the Hindenburg Line.[28] At 2:15 a.m. on 24 February, reports arrived that the Germans had gone and by 10:00 a.m. patrols from the 2nd Australian Division on the right and the 2nd and 18th Divisions in the centre and left, were advancing in a thick mist, with no sign of German troops.[29] Further south the German positions around Le Transloy were found abandoned on the night of 12/13 March and Australian Light Horse and infantry patrols entered Bapaume on 17 March.[30]\

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operations_on_the_Ancre,_January%E2%80%93March_1917
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Feb 2019 9:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

18 February 1917 - Australiam troopship Berrima

The Australian troopship Berrima is torpedoed by the German submarine U-84 in the English Channel off the coast of Portland. The crew manages to beach the Berrima with the loss of four lives. Just six days earlier the ship had landed 1,600 Australian troops at Plymouth.

http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/events/18-february-1917/
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