Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

The Surreys play the game.

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Somme Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Merlijn



Geregistreerd op: 18-2-2005
Berichten: 11533

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Er is ook een gedicht over geschreven:

"On through the heat of slaughter
Where gallant comrades fall
Where blood is poured like water
They drive the trickling ball
The fear of death before them
Is but an empty name
True to the land that bore them
The Surreys play the game"
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Rifleman T. Cantlon



Geregistreerd op: 21-2-2005
Berichten: 3350
Woonplaats: The Land of Plenty

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dat gedicht kende ik nog niet Surprised

Wat een sterke tekst zeg!
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Merlijn



Geregistreerd op: 18-2-2005
Berichten: 11533

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die foto van Neville zelf had ik nog nooit gezien.
Ik vond hem op deze site
http://www.silentcities.co.uk/index.htm
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Rifleman T. Cantlon



Geregistreerd op: 21-2-2005
Berichten: 3350
Woonplaats: The Land of Plenty

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

is ook bekend van wie dat gedicht is? Confused
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Merlijn



Geregistreerd op: 18-2-2005
Berichten: 11533

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik zelf weet het niet zeker.
Maar misschien iemand anders?
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Merlijn



Geregistreerd op: 18-2-2005
Berichten: 11533

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik kende hem wel maar ik heb hem van hier vandaan.
http://lachlan.bluehaze.com.au/surreysplayedthegame.html
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Rifleman T. Cantlon



Geregistreerd op: 21-2-2005
Berichten: 3350
Woonplaats: The Land of Plenty

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Google levert o.a. dit op:

Am still trying to find the original author and citation

Zou een aardig puzzeltje worden. Maar waarschijnlijk is het net zo'n anoniem gebleven auteur als van het Chanson de Craonne (ander topic over)
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
psycho_groupie



Geregistreerd op: 7-9-2005
Berichten: 447
Woonplaats: Veeningen

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Jan 2006 21:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ik kwam ook niet veel verder...

Quote:
Nevill was killed instantly and the Surreys were mowed down by machine guns, but one of the soccer balls is in the Imperial War Museum today. An anonymous poem appeared shortly afterward:
On through the heat of slaughter
Where gallant comrades fall
Where blood is poured like water
They drive the trickling ball
The fear of death before them
Is but an empty name
True to the land that bore them
The Surreys play the game.

_________________
This is one dull text for men, one useless text for mankind
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
erik



Geregistreerd op: 2-11-2005
Berichten: 943
Woonplaats: maaseik

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jan 2006 20:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nevill in het museum van Albert:

De grafsteen in 2003:
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2006 11:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
90 years on, the Somme remembered

Max Hastings
Saturday July 1, 2006
The Guardian

Captain WP Nevill of the 8th East Surreys was a complete ass. In the line in France, he liked to stand on a firestep of an evening, shouting insults at the Germans. Knowing that his men were about to participate in their first battle and keen to inspire, he had a wizard idea.

On leave in England, he bought footballs for each of his four platoons. One was inscribed: "The Great European Cup. The Final. East Surreys v Bavarians. Kick-off at Zero." Nevill offered a prize to whoever first put a ball into a German trench when the "big push" came.

Sure enough, when the whistles blew on July 1 1916, and 150,000 English, Scots, Welsh and Scottish soldiers climbed ladders to offer themselves to the German machine-guns, Nevill's footballers kicked off.

One of the few eye-witnesses to survive described watching a ball arch high into the sky over no-man's-land, on its way to the German trenches near Montauban. No winner collected Nevill's prize, however. Within minutes the captain was dead, as were most of his men.

Here is one of the enduring images of the Somme, which even after 90 years retains its fascination for a generation reared on Blackadder. In whom does not the spectacle of a field of poppies inspire a surge of mingled pity and rage?

So it did, among those who were there in 1916. One of my great-uncles, like Nevill an officer in the East Surreys, described the wild flowers in front of the parapets in his unhappy letters home. I have them all, including one to my grandfather, begging him to use his supposed influence to get my great-uncle transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. He was killed before Nevill.

The Somme is perceived as the great betrayal of innocents - and of the old working class in khaki - by Britain's ruling caste in breeches and glossy riding boots. It is thought to exemplify the futility of the first world war, and to represent the apogee of suffering in its campaigns. Like most such national legends, it would not have survived this long if there were not some truth in it.

Revisionist historians, of whom John Terraine was the foremost in his 1961 biography Haig: The Educated Soldier, have tried to persuade us that its generals were not the unfeeling brutes which caricature suggested.

They have failed. Haig was not a fool, indeed he administered Britain's huge armies in France with notable competence. But his own diaries present an image of an aristocratic Border Scot on the make; not much troubled by losses except insofar as these frustrated his military purposes; and preoccupied with royal intrigue.

He often wrote privately to King George V, not least expressing disgust about politicians, the despised "frocks". No British general of the second world war dared to emulate Haig's practice of serving champagne in his chateau headquarters while his men were drinking mud out of shellholes. He shared with most of his subordinates a pathetic faith in the power of artillery bombardment, and an almost unlimited willingness to keep attacking, even when battle after battle demonstrated that his offensives were profiting only the manufacturers of headstones.

The Somme assault was the most spectacular of Haig's failures. It was launched at the urgent behest of the French, to relieve pressure on Verdun, where a million "poilus" and "fritzes" were slaughtering each other.

The July 1 assault was preceded by weeks of British bombardment, which failed to achieve most of its purpose: much German barbed wire remained uncut; sufficient German machine-gunners survived in deep dug-outs.

In some sectors, attackers reached the first and even second German lines. "While we were rounding up prisoners," wrote Captain Herbert Sadler of the Royal Sussex, one of the successful British units, "I came upon one of the Fusiliers being embraced round the knees by a trembling Hun who had a very nice wristwatch. After hearing the man's plea for mercy the Fusilier said, 'That's all right, mate, I accept your apology, but let's have that ticker.' "

Yet, before British commanders could exploit such local successes, the Germans were able to shore up their lines. Haig's armies lost almost 60,000 dead and wounded on the first day. They continued to suffer through the months that followed, in increasingly grotesque attempts to reinforce failure.

Some units, ordered to launch assaults from the second line, were slaughtered by the Germans even before reaching the British front. This was the sort of tactical folly for which posterity justly declines to forgive Haig and his "donkeys".

Yet, in some important respects, popular legend errs in its understanding of what happened in 1916, and indeed between 1914 and 1918. First, our idea of the mindset of British soldiers is wildly over-influenced by the writings of soldier-poets, men like Frederic Manning, who wrote:

These are the damned circles Dante trod,

Terrible in hopelessness

But even skulls have their humour,

An eyeless and sardonic mockery

Infinitely more characteristic was the view expressed by the veteran HEL Mellersh, writing in 1978. He deplored the delusion that most combatants thought the war "one vast, futile tragedy, worthy to be remembered only as a pitiable mistake. I and my like entered the war expecting a heroic adventure and believing implicitly in the rightness of our cause; we ended greatly disillusioned as to the nature of the adventure, but still believing that our cause was right and we had not fought in vain."

As to the merit of the cause, it is striking to perceive the number of modern historians, some of them German, who perceive the Kaiser's Germany as an aggressive military tyranny of the nastiest kind. They argue that its victory in the first world war would have been a catastrophe for the freedom of Europe.

I am aware of no responsible historian who believes there was a way to break the stalemate of the western front, even with tanks. The technologies of killing and destruction had advanced vastly faster than those of mobility and communication. In battle after battle, defenders proved able to reinforce a threatened place faster than the attackers could exploit success there.

The obvious answer was to stop attacking. The allies might have sat tight in their trenches, and waited for blockade, starvation and the Americans to force the Germans to quit. Because the Germans occupied a substantial part of France, an overwhelming political and strategic onus rested on the French and British to sustain the offensive.

And yes, there was also a stubborn belief on the part of Haig and his subordinates that to abandon a commitment to attack would be unsoldierly, unBritish, wet - what we might characterise as the spirit of Captain Nevill.

One further issue should be considered. The allied generals of the first world war have been damned by posterity for their faith in attrition.

In the second world war, British strategy and tactics were overwhelmingly influenced by a determination that there should never again be a battle as costly, and as repugnant to popular sensibility, as the Somme.

Yet such fastidiousness was made possible by the fact that between 1941 and 1945 the Red Army did the attriting on behalf of us all. During that war, British and American ground forces killed about 200,000 German soldiers. The Russians killed about four million. Stalin's armies experienced a hundred Sommes, and Russia lost 27 million lives. Somebody, somewhere had to suffer to wear down Hitler's Wehrmacht. It was Britain's good fortune that this time it was not us.

As the bugles sound at the ceremonies in northern France today, we can mourn the hundreds of thousands they recall, and cherish a bleak gratitude. The scale of sacrifice remains unique. But the great poppy fields of the second world war lay in Russia rather than France and Flanders.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/frontpage/story/0,,1810319,00.html
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Jul 2006 16:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Paul Fussell, in The Great War and Modern Memory, explains:

One way of showing the sporting spirit was to kick a football toward the enemy lines while attacking. This feat was first performed by the 1st Battalion of the 18th London Regiment at Loos in 1915 It soon achieved the status of a conventional act of bravado and was ultimately exported far beyond the Western Front. Arthur ("Bosky") Burton, who took part in an attack on the Turkish lines near Beersheba in November, 1917, proudly reported home: "One of the men had a football. How it came there goodness knows. Anyway we kicked off and rushed the first [Turkish] guns, dribbling the ball With us." But the most famous football episode was Captain W. P. Nevill's achievement at the Somme attack. Captain Nevill, a company commander in the 8th East Surreys, bought four footballs, one for each platoon, during his last London leave before the attack. He offered a prize to the platoon which, at the jump-off, first kicked its football up to the German front line. Although J. R. Ackerley remembered Nevill as "the battalion buffoon," he may have been shrewder than he looked: his little sporting contest did have the effect of persuading his men that the attack was going to be, as the staff had been insisting, a walkover. A survivor observing from a short distance away recalls zero hour:

As the gun-fire died away I saw an infantry man climb onto the parapet into No Man's Land, beckoning others to follow [Doubtless Captain Nevill or one of his platoon commanders.] As he did So he kicked off a football. A good kick. 'The ball rose and travelled well towards the German line. That seemed to be the signal to advance.

Captain Nevill was killed instantly. Two of the footballs are preserved today in English museums.

That Captain Nevill's sporting feat was felt to derive from the literary inspiration of [Henry Newbolt's] poem ["Vitai Lampada"] about the cricket-boy hero seems apparent from the poem by one "Touchstone" written to celebrate it. This appears on the border of an undated field concert program preserved in the Imperial War Museum:

THE GAME

A Company of the East Surrey Regiment is reported to have dribbled four footballs-the gift of their Captain, who fell in the fight—for a mile and a quarter intothe enemy trenches.

On through the hail of slaughter,
Where gallant comrades Fall,
Where blood is poured like water,
They drive the trickling ball.
The fear of death before them
Is but an empty name.
True to the land that bore them-
The SURREYS play the game.

And so on for two more stanzas. If anyone at the time thought Captain Nevill's act preposterous, no one said so. The nearest thing to such an attitude is a reference in the humorous trench newspaper The Wipers Times (Sept. 8, 1917), but even here the target of satire is not so much the act of Captain Nevill as the rhetoric of William Beach Thomas, who served as the Daily Mail's notoriously fatuous war correspondent. As the famous correspondent "'Teech Bomas," he is made to say of Nevill's attack: "On they came kicking footballs, and so completely puzzled the Potsdammers. With one last kick they were amoungst them with the bayonet, and although the Berliners battled bravely for a while, they kameraded with the best." (The Great War and Modern Memory, 27-28.)

http://www.lib.byu.edu/~english/WWI/children/captain_nevill.html
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Jul 2006 16:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hauptmann W.P. Nevill von den East Surreys war jung, überzeugter Soldat und leidenschaftlicher Fußballfan. Keiner seiner Männer hatte Fronterfahrung, und so kaufte er zur allgemeinen Motivation kurzerhand vier Fußbälle für seine vier Einheiten. Ein ehrenvolles, heldenhaftes und siegreiches Spiel wollte er von seinen Untergebenen sehen. Der Anstoß fand pünktlich um 7.30 Uhr am Morgen des 1. Juli 1916 statt.

Stille lag über der Somme, als die britische Artillerie nach sieben Tagen und Nächten beispiellosen Trommelfeuers endlich verstummte. In den von roten Mohnblumen übersähten Feldern warteten über 120.000 britische Soldaten auf die Zero Hour, den Zeitpunkt des Angriffs auf die deutschen Stellungen vor ihnen. Da sie die Verteidigungslinien des Gegners durch das Trommelfeuer zerstört wähnten, schleppten sie nicht nur Waffen, sondern auch hinderliches Arbeitsgerät mit, um die vermeintlich zerbombten Schützengräben wieder aufzubauen.

Private DraperHauptmann W.P. Nevill spürte, dass ihm ein großartiger und sportlicher Tag bevor stand, als er hinaus an die französische Morgenluft trat, die so friedlich nach den sieben Tagen des Höllenfeuers wirkte. Wie jeden Morgen stieß er wüste Beschimpfungen in Richtung der deutschen Stellungen aus. Ein letztes Mal munterte er seine East Surreys auf, sich nicht zu sehr um nebensächliche Gewehrsalven oder Granateneinschläge zu kümmern, sondern mit britischem Stolz Fußball zu spielen. Im Niemandsland zwischen den Schützengräben. Ohne Deckung. Und demjenigen, der einen der vier Bälle als Erster in das Tor dribbeln würde, versprach Hauptmann Nevill sogar eine Belohnung. Was genau er denn mit “Tor” meine, fragte ihn ein Gefreiter daraufhin. “Den deutschen Schützengraben vor uns”, antwortete Hauptmann Nevill lächelnd.

Stille lag über der Somme kurz vor 7.30 Uhr, kurz vor Beginn der Offensive. Zeitgleich mit dem Zeichen zum Angriff kletterte Hauptmann Nevill aus seinem Graben, bedeutete seinen Männern zu folgen und schoss einen Fußball hoch ins Niemandsland hinein. “Ein guter Schuss. Der Ball stieg auf und flog weit in Richtung der deutschen Linie”, erinnert sich ein Überlebender später. Noch während der Ball die angenehme Luft des französischen Sommers durchschnitt, folgten viele der East Surreys ihrem Hauptmann und dribbelten die anderen Bälle Richtung Feind, weil sie glaubten, diese Schlacht würde so harmlos wie ein Fußballspiel für sie enden.

Wenig später brach der grausamste Schlachtenlärm über sie herein, den die Menschheit bis dato entfacht hatte, zerfetzte die wunderschönen Wälder und Mohnfelder nahe der Somme zu Schlammsümpfen und kahlen Steppen. Tatsächlich soll es einem Soldaten der East Surreys in diesem nie dagewesenen Inferno gelungen sein, einen Ball in einen deutschen Schützengraben zu schießen. Die Belohnung aber konnte er sich nicht mehr abholen: Hauptmann W.P. Nevill starb in der ersten halben Stunde der Schlacht. Sein Wahnsinn wurde in der britischen Presse damals als aufrichtiger Heldenmut dargestellt.

Zwei der vier Bälle können heute im Museum besichtigt werden. Einer von ihnen trägt die Inschrift:

The Great European Cup
The Final
East Surreys V. Bavarians
Kick-off at Zero

Stille kehrte an der Somme erst am 18. November wieder ein.

East Surreys

Die Schlacht an der Somme war die verlustreichste Schlacht des Ersten Weltkriegs. Mit Hauptmann Nevill zusammen wurden über 8.000 britische Soldaten allein in der ersten halben Stunde vernichtet, über 19.000 allein am 1. Juli 1916.
Mehr Informationen:
The Guardian zum 90. Jahrestag.
Wikipedia - Schlacht an der Somme.
Zeitgenössische Pressemeinung.
The First Day on the Somme von Martin Middlebrook.
.
http://fooligan.de/2006/07/08/der-grosse-europapokal-das-finale/
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
erik



Geregistreerd op: 2-11-2005
Berichten: 943
Woonplaats: maaseik

BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Aug 2006 23:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De originele bal te zien in het IWM:
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Richard



Geregistreerd op: 3-2-2005
Berichten: 13329

BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Aug 2006 23:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Eigenlijk was die W.P. Nevill, als ik het goed begrijp, dus een ongelooflijke opportunistische sukkel zonder enige realiteitszin en daarom een soort legende geworden. Zo'n beetje het toppunt van naiviteit en daarom verworden tot curiositeit.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Merlijn



Geregistreerd op: 18-2-2005
Berichten: 11533

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Aug 2006 8:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

erik @ 12 Aug 2006 0:02 schreef:
De originele bal te zien in het IWM:

Het is trouwens niet helemaal zeker dat dit de originel is he.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
erik



Geregistreerd op: 2-11-2005
Berichten: 943
Woonplaats: maaseik

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Aug 2006 22:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Merlijn,
De uitleg over de bal op de site van het IWM:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConGallery.45/imageIndex/1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
wagner



Geregistreerd op: 18-2-2005
Berichten: 443
Woonplaats: Eindhoven

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Aug 2006 20:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

In het boek "Billie - The Nevill Letters:1914-1916" van Ruth Elwin Harris wordt het "hoe en waarom" van de voetballen als volgt beschreven:

One of the most controversial aspects of the battle on july 1st was the way in which the British were ordered to attack: at a walking pace uphill towards the German front line and its heavy artillery. Rawlinson took it for granted that German artillery would have been wiped out by the British bombardment, and the german wire cut. The attack would therefore be a walkover. (…) One reason for Rawlinson’s insistence on the slow pace was his fear that the inexperienced battalions of Kitchener’s New Armies would disintegrate in a rush attack.
Some of Kitchener’s officers themselves wondered how both they and their men would react in a battle situation. The East Surreys had discussed it in the mess as far back as April. It was Billie (who, so the divisional history says, ‘held as vastly important the study of his men’s mental and temperamental characteristics,’) who suggested that the men should be given footballs to dribble before them as they attacked over No Man’s Land.
Football had been important to the battalion ever since the Codford days. During the previous winter, Association Football had even been considered part of brigade training during the battalion’s time in billets, with every platoon expected to put a team forward for matches. Believing that so familiar an occupation would calm the men, Billie sought permission from Major Irwin, who sanctioned it, ‘on condition,’Irwin remembered years later, ‘that he and his officers really kept command of their units and didn’t allow it to develop into a rush after the ball…if a man came across the ball he could kick it forward but he mustn’t chase after it and I think myself that it did help them enormously. It took their minds off it.

Wagner
_________________
Frieden macht Reichtum, Reichtum macht Übermut, Übermut macht Krieg. Krieg macht Armut, Armut macht Demut, Demut macht Frieden
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Niwde



Geregistreerd op: 26-6-2005
Berichten: 69
Woonplaats: Leeuwarden

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Aug 2006 10:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Richard @ 12 Aug 2006 0:11 schreef:
Eigenlijk was die W.P. Nevill, als ik het goed begrijp, dus een ongelooflijke opportunistische sukkel zonder enige realiteitszin en daarom een soort legende geworden. Zo'n beetje het toppunt van naiviteit en daarom verworden tot curiositeit.


Precies, het lijkt zelfs wel of er een soort waardering bestaat voor deze actie terwijl hij striktgenomen zijn manschappen een welhaast zekere dood heeft ingejaagd (voor zover die al niet zeker was...).
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage
A Duck



Geregistreerd op: 19-6-2005
Berichten: 823

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Aug 2006 11:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Niwde @ 16 Aug 2006 11:37 schreef:
Richard @ 12 Aug 2006 0:11 schreef:
Eigenlijk was die W.P. Nevill, als ik het goed begrijp, dus een ongelooflijke opportunistische sukkel zonder enige realiteitszin en daarom een soort legende geworden. Zo'n beetje het toppunt van naiviteit en daarom verworden tot curiositeit.


Precies, het lijkt zelfs wel of er een soort waardering bestaat voor deze actie terwijl hij striktgenomen zijn manschappen een welhaast zekere dood heeft ingejaagd (voor zover die al niet zeker was...).


Het feit dat hij door deze onzinnigheid niet alleen zijn manschappen, maar ook zichzelf de dood heeft ingejaagd maakt hem net zo goed tot slachtoffer van de waanzin van de oorlog. Alleen dan een slachtoffer dat erg tot de verbeelding spreekt.
_________________

Is het een vliegtuig? Is het superman?
Nee, het is A Duck.
"In oorlog wordt geschiedenis geschreven, in vrede wordt deze slechts opgetekend."
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Niwde



Geregistreerd op: 26-6-2005
Berichten: 69
Woonplaats: Leeuwarden

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Aug 2006 12:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Natuurlijk is het net zo triest dat de Neville zelf ook is gevallen, dat ben ik volledig met je eens. Neville was net zo goed slachtoffer van het opportunisme.

Het verbaast mij alleen dat ik ten aanzien van dit, in mijn ogen, waanzinnige optreden, maar zelden een kritische noot vind. Laten we wel zijn, zelfs al had de artillerie op 1 juli 1916 de beoogde vernietigende uitwerking gehad, dan nog was deze actie pure waanzin. Een kapitein is niet de eerste de beste en je mag toch verwachten dat deze enige tactische realiteitszin heeft.

Daarbij teken ik wel gelijk aan dat zoiets wellicht in die tijd niet als waanzin gezien werd, maar als moedig en voorbeeldig. Mogelijk heeft deze visie nog steeds de nodige aanhang. Er zijn trouwens wel meer verhalen van Britse officieren die met de nodige overmoed het niemandsland betraden (of zelfs te paard bereden) en daardoor vrijwel meteen sneuvelden.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage
Richard



Geregistreerd op: 3-2-2005
Berichten: 13329

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Aug 2006 13:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik denk dat als je dit soort kritiek op een Brits forum zou plaatsen, de woedende reacties niet van de lucht zouden zijn.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Niwde



Geregistreerd op: 26-6-2005
Berichten: 69
Woonplaats: Leeuwarden

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Aug 2006 13:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zeker weten Laughing Ga ik ook maar niet doen. Toch is het wel jammer dat de Britten op dit punt te weinig zelfkritisch zijn.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage
Richard



Geregistreerd op: 3-2-2005
Berichten: 13329

BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Aug 2006 13:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Niet alleen op dit punt.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Jul 2007 18:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Het gerucht gaat dat bij de Tommy in Pozières ook een originele voetbal ligt.
Maar ja, hoe weet je ooit zeker of het om die voetbal van die gelegenheid gaat.
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Somme Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group