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28 December

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Dec 2005 6:42    Onderwerp: 28 December Reageer met quote

This Day In History | World War I

December 28

1856 Woodrow Wilson is born


Thomas Woodrow Wilson, who will become the 28th president of the United States, is born on this day in Staunton, Virginia.

A former president of Princeton University and governor of New Jersey, Wilson won election to his first term in the White House as a Democrat in 1912 on a campaign program called “The New Freedom,” which stressed individualism and states’ rights. From the day he took office in March 1913—when a parade organized by the Congressional Union, later to become known as the National Organization for Women, drew crowds away from the inauguration ceremonies—Wilson had to contend with the growing controversy over women’s suffrage on the home front. His administration saw the passage of several major acts of legislation, including the Federal Reserve Act and the creation of the Federal Trade Commission, designed to regulate business practices.

As war broke out in Europe in the summer of 1914, Wilson lost his wife of thirty years, Ellen, to liver cancer. Unable to abandon himself to his grief, he instead dedicated himself to his work, winning re-election in 1916 on a strict neutrality platform and the slogan “He kept us out of the war.” But Wilson soon decided that the U.S. could not remain neutral in the face of German aggression on the high seas and in April 1917 he asked Congress for a Declaration of War.

American participation in World War I helped turn the tide towards the Allies, and Wilson played a crucial role in determining the terms of the resulting peace. His famous “Fourteen Points,” presented to Congress in January 1918, introduced the idea of an international covenant aimed at resolving conflict, an idea that would come to fruition with the formation of the League of Nations. At Versailles in the month’s following Germany’s surrender, Wilson struggled to convince his counterparts in Britain and France, David Lloyd George and Georges Clemenceau, that in order for peace to endure, Germany must not be punished too harshly.

Wilson faced even tougher resistance at home. In late 1919, the Versailles Treaty was defeated in Congress by steadfast opposition from Henry Cabot Lodge and other Republican legislators. (Because it was not ratified, the U.S. negotiated a separate Treaty of Berlin with Germany that was signed on August 25, 1921.) Despite this failure, Wilson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. His idea of his country as the world’s leader in shaping international relations is a vision that, to a certain extent, has continued to inspire U.S. foreign policy to the present day.

Wilson left the White House in 1921 after suffering a physical breakdown and a stroke that left him paralyzed. Nursed by his second wife, Edith, he died on February 3, 1924.

http://www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Dec 2005 6:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 28. Dezember

1914
Die französisch-englische Offensive in Flandern
Die Karpathenkämpfe
Der englische Vorstoß gegen die deutsche Nordseeküste
Ein Manifest der französischen Sozialdemokratie

1915
Beschießung des Bahnhofs Soissons
Vergebliche russische Sturmangriffe in Beßarabien
Kriegstagung der bulgarischen Sobranje

1916
Voller Sieg in der Schlacht bei Rimnicul-Sarat
Die Verfolgung der Russen in der Walachei
Die Durchbruchsschlacht in der Ostwalachei
Aufbringung eines russischen Munitionsdampfers durch ein deutsches U-Boot

1917
Zunehmende Feuertätigkeit bei Asiago
18500 Tonnen in der Irischen See versenkt
Die vorläufige Einigung mit Rußland
Drei englische Zerstörer verloren

1918
-

http://www.stahlgewitter.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Emperor Nicholas II- As I Knew Him - Diary in Russia 1914

28th December 1914.

Lunched with the Emperor on the Imperial train, and H.I.M. came up to me after lunch and talked about my ancestor, Sir Charles Hanbury-Williams, who was Ambassador to Russia in the time of the Empress Catherine (then Grand Duchess).

He then turned to the all-important question of munitions, the lack of which had become very acute and terribly serious. He told me he was much obliged to me for calling the attention of the Staff to certain points

in regard to U.S.A. and Canadian supplies and questions of transport, winter difficulties, methods of business, and to urgency of giving their orders at once, if they decided to place their orders there. Having been five years in Canada and visited the U.S.A., I naturally knew something of business methods there, etc.

H.I.M. told me he had given orders for the immediate carrying out of all that is necessary.

Note: I fear these orders did not have much effect, as the munition story was one of invariable delays and difficulties.

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/hanbury/1914.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

28 December 1914 - HMAS SYDNEY

HMAS SYDNEY, (cruiser), coaled at Ponta Delgada in the Azores. Nine German ships were observed at anchor in neutral Portuguese waters.

http://www.navyhistory.org.au/category/navy-day-by-day/1914-1918/page/2/


HMAS Sydney gun crew

http://www.navy.gov.au/File:Hmas-sydney-gun-crew.jpg
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

In a letter written on the 28th December 1914 John Baber made the following point.

"On Boxing Day we were relieved, but the Bn on the right still kept up the truce with the season. It is rumoured (I believe with truth) that our gunners shelled their trenches & the Germans left their trenches & approached outs for safety! The truce still continues today. It is purely local & quite an impossible position.
Your loving son, John."

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?s=f79e75278900bdfdeba2dbb2e642614d&showtopic=157233
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from Captain Sir Edward Hulse
Dr. Ken Newberger

“My Dearest Mother, Just returned to billets [quarters] after the most extraordinary Christmas in the trenches you could possibly imagine. Words fail me completely in trying to describe it, but here it goes!” So began an amazing letter dated Monday, December 28, 1914, by British soldier Captain Sir Edward Hulse in the midst of World War I. The letter received wide circulation both in England and in the U.S. Sadly, the captain was killed in action two and a half months later in France.

It was Wednesday, December 23, when the captain and his troops were ordered to the front line against German troops. The exchange of fire between the warring armies was intense. However, early Friday morning, on December 25, the shooting by the Germans began to subside. By 8:00 a.m., they were not firing at all. At 8:30 Captain Hulse was startled by an unexpected sight. Unarmed, four Germans left their protected positions and began walking toward the British side. Unsure of their intentions and not wanting them to get too close, the captain and one of his men headed out to meet them. Weapons from both sides were pointed at them.

As the men huddled together, Captain Hulse questioned their purpose. “What orders do you have from your officers?” “None,” the Germans replied. They came out from their trenches out of goodwill. They wanted to wish their British counterparts a merry Christmas. This is why the German soldiers ceased firing. They said that unless ordered otherwise they were going to withhold their fire.

After thirty minutes, the English party escorted the Germans back to their line of barbed wire. They parted after a friendly exchange of British cigarettes and German cigars. Then Captain Hulse went immediately to headquarters to report the incident.

Returning at 10 a.m., he couldn't believe what his eyes saw in the open space between the two armies: “I saw, to my amazement, not only a crowd of about 150 British and Germans ... [in front of] my lines, but six or seven such crowds, all the way down ... extending toward the 8th Division on our right.” The only things left in the trenches were the weapons.

Stunned, Hulse observed that the soldiers “were fraternizing in the most genuine possible manner. Every sort of souvenir was exchanged ... photos of families shown, etc.” The captain exclaimed, “It was absolutely astounding, and if I had seen it on film I should have sworn that it was faked!” A British soldier captured the prevailing sentiment. “It’s only right that we should show that we could desist from hostilities on a day which is so important in both countries.”

The captain went on to describe the day itself. “From foul rain and wet, the weather had cleared up the night before to a sharp frost, and it was a perfect day, everything white, and the silence seemed extraordinary, after the usual din. From all sides birds seemed to arrive, and we hardly ever see a bird generally. Later in the day I fed about 50 sparrows outside my dug-out, which shows how complete the silence was.”

During this lull in hostilities, an agreement for the care of the dead was reached. Soldiers who had been killed near the opposing side were carried out to the halfway line where they were honored and buried. Personal effects of the dead were exchanged. The sounds of war were stilled, and shalomic peace emerged for a day among soldiers who were otherwise locked in a struggle for life and death.

- - This Closing Paragraph has been Added - -

We live in a hostile, violent world. Yet the message of Christmas is still one of peace. What this means is that there is no heart which cannot be softened, no marriage which cannot be restored, no division which cannot be bridged through a spirit of unity centered around Bethlehem’s babe. May the peace that He brings be yours and your family’s this season for a very Merry Christmas indeed.

Permission to Use - Pastors, teachers, and other church leaders may verbally share this story from the pulpit, classroom, or other setting. If they desire to reprint it in a church newsletter or other publication for their congregation or local community (only), the following credit must be included: "Copyright © 2010 Dr. Ken Newberger. www.ResolveChurchConflict.com Permission to use granted."

http://www.resolvechurchconflict.com/christmas-story.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hyde In War Time - BELGIAN WEDDING BELLS

At St. Stephen’s Church Flowery field, on Monday, the 28th December, 1914, there took place a wedding of more then ordinary interest, for both the bride and bridegroom were Belgian refugees in Hyde. They were Anne Marie Schippers and Gustaaf Vervoorst. The Rev. F.H. Coveney, then Curate-in-Charge of St. Stephen’s, preformed the ceremony, and once more the services of Mr. Van Aalten were obtained as interpreter. The Mayor (Councillor Welch) accompanied the parties to church, and gave the bride away. Other Belgian refugees including to from Rosemount, with the Rev. H. Ross, Primitive Methodist minister, were at the wedding. After the ceremony, the bride and bridegroom were driven to Marple, where they were entertained by Councillor and Mrs. Welch at their home. In the evening, there was a reception at Rosemount School, Newton. In accordance with custom, the bride and bridegroom were given numerous wedding presents.

http://hydonian.blogspot.com/2010/08/hyde-in-war-time-1914-16-page13-14.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

CIVIL WAR: African-American Medal Of Honor Recipients

ANDERSON, BRUCE
Rank and organization: Private, Company K, 142d New York Infantry.
Born: Mexico, Oswego County, N.Y., 9 June 1845.
Place and date: At Fort Fisher, N.C., 15 January 1865.
Entered service at: Ephratah, N.Y.
Date of issue: 28 December 1914.
Citation: Voluntarily advanced with the head of the column and cut down the palisading.

http://www.buffalosoldier.net/CIVILWARAFRICAN-AMERICANMEDALOFHONORRECIPIENTS.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Extract from : Despatch from Sir R. Storrs, British Agency, Cairo, to Foreign Office, 28 December 1914.

…We are all heartily relieved to have got the new Sultan on his throne without any untoward incident…With regard to Palestine, I suppose that while we naturally do not want to burden ourselves with fresh responsibilities such as would be imposed upon us by annexation, we are, I take it, averse to the prospect of a Russian advance Southwards into Syria, or of too great extension of the inevitable French Protectorate over the Lebanon, etc. … A buffer State is most desirable, but can we set one up? There are no visible indigenous elements out of which a Moslem Kingdom of Palestine can be constructed. The Jewish State is in theory an attractive idea; but the Jews, though they constitute a majority in Jerusalem itself, are very much in a minority in Palestine generally, and form indeed a bare sixth of the whole population. Again would not Islam be extremely indignant at the idea of handing over our conquests to a people which has taken no part as a nation in the war…

http://www.archiveeditions.co.uk/titledetails.asp?tid=67
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Front Line - Transcript of a Letter from Lieutenant Frederick ('Eric') Rees to 'Louie', 28 December 1915

...out among my old friends
again it is almost like
going back to your home.
Now Mother dear I will
cease this epistle & get into
some shoes & smoke a
pipe of peace, we have
just gone quite mad
with the gramophone, had
a dance round the hut
which being small made
us get in each others way
somewhat.
Everything is much better
than we expected so far
& we are all as cheerful
as mud larks- name
appropriate as there is 'some'
mud about.
Will really stop now
Best love & wishes to everyone
[new page]
P.S.
You might send out my
Sam Browne belt some time
as I find they are worn
quite a lot out here.
Main use for revolvers out
here seems to be for strafing
rats which abound.

http://www.travelinenortheast.info/recordoffice/usp.nsf/pws/Durham+Record+Office+-+The+Learning+Zone+-+World+War+One+-+Leisure+-+Transcript+of+Rees+letter+(1) via http://www.travelinenortheast.info/recordoffice/usp.nsf/pws/durham+record+office+-+the+learning+zone+-+world+war+one+-+leisure+-+front+line
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from Karl Abraham to Sigmund Freud, December 28, 1915


Karl Abraham
Berlin
28 December 1915

Dear Professor,

Contrary to all my expectations, I did get leave, which I am spending partly here and partly in Bremen. I had planned to use the present free time to write to you when I was surprised by the announcement of your son's wedding,1 and now I can begin my letter with my wife's and my heartfelt congratulations to all of you. It is pleasing to be able to congratulate somebody in these times. When you have time, I should be glad to hear how this happened so quickly.—I hope I can assume that your sons at the front are well; how are your sons-in-law? (...)

http://www.pep-web.org/document.php?id=zbk.052.0320a
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diary of EW Manifold - WWI

Edward Walford Manifold was born on 28th April 1892 and grew up in the Western District of Victoria. He travelled to England to join the Royal Field Artillery when World War I broke out.

Diary Entry - 28th December, 1915
A busy day in Cambrin, as the Bosch must have put as many as 200 shells along the La Bassée road, the majority of them being 5.9s and 4.2s and just an odd pipsqueak in the evening. At eleven thirty, Hoyland and I set out for the wagon line and, as we left, we heard some heavies dropping near Harley Street, and we went on to Beuvry by the backwater from the La Bassée canal. It was quite nice going along the canal bank and a good change after the cobbles. We found the horses watering at the trough, which is right on the railway beside the backwater, and Griffith was down there superintending. After following the horses back to stables, we stayed to see them feed and then went up to Griffith's billet. We were yarning there when Reeves came up and joined us and, after a drink, we all set off for Cambrin, it being one o'clock. When we got to the end of the straight two miles, we came across a wounded horse, and Reeves seemed to sense danger and said, "I'm sure they have been giving us a doing." A little further on, the road seemed very empty and everyone was standing outside their houses gazing towards Brigade offices. We enquired what was doing and were told our adjutant, Rodd, was wounded and an orderly officer, Murdock, but they were only slight wounds. On turning down the Tourbieres loop, we saw that the Mess had had a narrow escape: the houses on its left showed the marks of the splinters and were minus a lot of tiles. We met Suttie, smiling as usual, and he told us one of our attached men was wounded and a sergeant at the brigade - as well as a motorcyclist, who was badly hit in the back. On entering the Mess, we found it in a state of chaos. The soot had fallen down the chimney and choked it up, and the rooms were full of smoke. There were about six of our precious glass windows gone too. On inspecting the shell holes, I found that there were two just short, one 10 yards short and the other 20. Another one went over and landed in some soft ground, making a hole five feet deep by 12 to 15 in diameter. Later in the afternoon, I got a shovel and, with the assistance of Bombardier Taylor, dug about three feet down and got the ring and then got Taylor to go a few more inches and got the fuse. It is a splendid specimen, if I can only keep it. These holes in front of the mess are in stiff clay and are four feet deep by 12 in diameter. At about three thirty, they dropped a few more woollies (4.2), just to the rear of the 41st Brigade but, after one or two rounds, they shortened up and burst them over the crest. At four fifteen, they put over about five 8 inch behind the slag heap and made a tremendous noise. I am glad to say none came over in the night. This shelling is all put down to the new 6 inch naval gun, which was brought up to shoot at the Bosch sausages [?]. It fired its first shells yesterday, and I should think you could see it for miles, as it makes such huge amounts of smoke. It is the gun they wanted to put in our archway.

http://ewmanifold.blogspot.com/2010/12/diary-entry-28th-december-1915.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Small photograph of AIF troops celebrating Christmas at Ismailia Camp, Egypt, in December 1915.



The photograph is part of a collection of photographs belonging to Alfred Galbraith. Sapper Galbraith was in Egypt with the 2nd and 5th Division from December 1915 to June 1916, when the 5th Division sailed to France.

Alfred Galbraith described the day in a letter home, dated 28 December 1915.

http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/803317/photograph-christmas-dinner-egypt-1915
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diary entry of 28 December 1915 of Richard Meinertzhagen, officer in the British Expeditionary Force, fighting in German East Africa.

At 5 p.m. we located four tents, fires burning and, by the mercy of God, no precautions, no sentries and men lounging about. The country was good for stalking and we were well in position for a rush at dusk. We used bayonets only and I think we each got our man. Drought got three, a great effort. I rushed into the officers' tent, where I found a stout German on a camp bed. On a table was a most excellent Xmas dinner. I covered him with my rifle and shouted to him to hold his hands up. He at once groped under his pillow and I had to shoot, killing him at once...

We covered the dead with bushes and I placed sentries round the camp and sent out a patrol of three men. Drought said he was hungry, so was I, and why waste that good dinner? So we set to and had one of the best though most gruesome dinners I have ever had, including an excellent Xmas pudding. The fat German dead in bed did not disturb us in the least, nor restrain our appetites.

http://inkhornterm.blogspot.com/2009/03/planes-and-lines-1915-australian.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bassano Mail, 28 december 1916

http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/newspapers/BSM/1916/12/28/1/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Clermont

Clermont is a charming and substantial town on the gentle slopes above Sandy Creek and Hoods Lagoon. The town is located 106 km north of Emerald on the Gregory Highway and 760 km north of Brisbane. (...)

The town's worst flood (and the second-worst in the country's history in terms of loss of life) occurred on the night of 28 December 1916 when cyclonic waters rushed through the town sweeping houses away, forcing people to clamber up trees to escape the torrent, and drowning at least 65 people.

At the town's entrance is a large cement 'tree' with a white mark far up its trunk which indicates the height of the floodwaters and the people who died in the disaster. The monument is located on what used to be the town's main street. The remains of the old bridge, which was largely washed away, can be seen at the bottom of Capella Street (now the town's main thoroughfare). Nearby, in Lime Street, is Centenary Park with its famous traction engine which helped to move the town from its original site onto higher ground.

After the flood the survivors decided to move to the higher ground on which the town now stands. The town's recovery from the flood was rapid and today it is a centre with a considerable number of attractive buildings.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/Queensland/Clermont/2005/02/17/1108500202251.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Road to Flers

(...) What, one wonders, accounts for the death of Private Frank Thompson (in reality Frank Langley), 9th Battalion (Queensland), in Plot I, Row C, Grave 21, who was killed in action on Christmas Day 1916? His battalion was near the front in the period before and after Christmas 1916 and others of the unit killed at that time also lie in Plot I at Bulls Road including Private William Christensen in Plot I, Row C, Grave 22, killed in action on 28 December 1916. Chistensen’s fate was probably typical enough of the fatalities during this period of the war – he was killed by a shell while on fatigue duty carrying a wooden ‘duckboard’. These ‘duckboards’ were long slatted wooden structures placed end–to–end to give passage across the mud. (...)

http://www.ww1westernfront.gov.au/flers/les-cavees.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Christmas 1916 - with the 4th Field Ambulance, A.I.F.

Private William Dalton Lycett, 2063, of the 4th Field Ambulance A.I.F. enlisted on 12th September 1914, he embarked on the 22nd December 1914 at Melbourne on the H.M.A.T. “Berrima”.

Thursday 28th December, 1916 - Was coughing a good deal last night and did not sleep too well. Up at 10.30 a.m., very hard white frost overnight and pretty cold. Gave a hand with patients and had a walk up street with S.S. Bankier before dinner, who left us today for O.T.C. England. On duty at 2 p.m. About two dozen patients, did dressings etc. and gave out medicines, after which had game of bridge till tea-time at 5 p.m. Cleaned up after tea and then played bridge till went off duty at 8 p.m. when had some rum and milk and turned in.

http://outofbattle.blogspot.com/2009/12/christmas-1916-with-4th-field-ambulance.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:53    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

William Mandeno Smallfield



(...) William, aged 20 years when he enlisted, wrote to his mother every three or four days, and here we learn more about the waistcoat – a Christmas gift from his grandmother in 1916, received along with silk shirts from his mother.

“The leather waistcoat arrived yesterday, and I am writing a short letter to Grandmother thanking her for it... The silk shirts which you sent me, while being too late to use on the voyage over, are of the greatest use to me now. Silk next to the skin, quite prevents the trouble common to us in the trenches, and for that reason they are worth many pounds to me now.” (28 December 1916)

http://www.aucklandmuseum.com/833/william-mandeno-smallfield
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GERMAN REPLY TO THE SWISS PEACE NOTE, December 28, 1916

The Imperial Government has taken note of the fact that the
Swiss Federal Council, as a result of its having placed itself in
communication some time ago with the President of the United States
of America, is also ready to take action side by side with them towards
bringing about an understanding between the belligerent nations and
towards the attainment of a lasting peace. The spirit of true humanity
by which the step of the Swiss Federal Council is inspired is fully
appreciated and esteemed by the Imperial Government.

The Imperial Government has informed the President of the
United States that a direct exchange of views seems to them to be
the most suitable means of obtaining the desired result. Led by the
same considerations which caused Germany on December 12 to offer
her hand for peace negotiations, the German Government has proposed
an immediate meeting of delegates of all the belligerents at a neutral
place. In agreement with the President of the United States the
Imperial Government is of opinion that the great work of preventing
future wars can only be taken in hand after the present world war has
terminated. As soon as that moment has come they will be joyfully
ready to cooperate in this sublime task.

If Switzerland, which, faithful to the country's noble traditions
in mitigating the sufferings caused by the present war, has deserved
imperishable merit, will also contribute to safeguarding the world's
peace, the German nation and Government will highly welcome that.

http://www.questia.com/read/3552157
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 22:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letter from 2683 William Albert Wenham to his mother



Transcript:

"Lnc Cpl W. Wenham
2683 5th Batt
Lincolnshire Regt
Kriegsgefangenen Lazarett
Alexandrinenstr
Berlin
Germany

[note in different hand, probably date of receipt:] Jan 25th 1917

Mrs. Wenham
49 Barcroft St
New Cleethorpes
Grimsby
Lincs
ENGLAND

28 Dec 1916

Dear Mother,
Just to let you know I am getting on alright & hope you are all well at home. Please, will you write to Ted, you will get the address from his mother. Say I am alright & should like to hear from him. Give my love to Maria & the children. I will write more when I can write my own cards, but I am getting on very well.

Love from your loving son
Billy"

Lees verder op http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/document/8727?REC=6
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Alfred Edwin McKay



Captain Alfred Edwin “Eddie” McKay MC (27 December 1892 – 28 December 1917) was a Canadian flying ace who flew with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. (...)

Around March 1916, McKay completed his training at the Wright Aviation School in August, Georgia, and shipped off to Europe as a member of the Royal Flying Corps. An editorial that appeared in the The Western University Gazette in the same month, described Eddie was as a “careful” flyer who was one of the best pilots ever produced at Wright. He was assigned to 24 Squadron where he flew an Airco D.H.2 and recorded four victories between 20 July 1916 and 25 January 1917. For his efforts, McKay was promoted to Captain and transferred to train new pilots. Later that year, he cited boredom when he requested to be moved back into a combat role. Subsequently, McKay was reassigned to 23 Squadron flying the French made Spad S. VII. He earned his final six victories (bringing his total to ten) within a one month period stretching from 19 November 1917 to 18 December 1917. During a 26 October dogfight, McKay was pursued by German ace Manfred von Richthofen when they disrupted Oswald Boelcke and Erwin Bohme's attack on Alfred Gerald Knight. McKay initially credited with downing Boelcke, but confirmed that Boelcke collided with Bohme during the assault. On 28 December 1917, McKay was shot down over Belgium. Jasta 2's Leutnant Karl Menckhoff was credited with the victory, although a German 2-seater also claimed a SPAD at this time and place. In Above the Trenches, Christopher Shores suggests that McKay became a prisoner of war after being shot down, but Veteran Affairs Canada lists the 28th as the day he was killed in action.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Edwin_McKay
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Driver Jonathan Goulding



Driver Jonathan Goulding Royal Field Artillery. Died 28th December 1917, aged 27.

He was a postman before he enlisted in Derby on 8th December 1915 and prior to being sent to France he was married to Beatrice Forest at Holy Trinity Church on 1st April 1915, at the time she lived at Nottingham Place.

His records state that his disability originated April 1916 at Arras when he had "a bad attack of rheumatic fever (104 degree temp)". He was in hospital for five weeks, after this he noticed"that his breath was short on exertion". His records state that his disability was the result of active service, cold and exposure and was permanent.

He was discharged on 11th November 1916 and at home his condition gradually worstened until he died on 27th December 1917.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/merlyn63/5171783924/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The New York Times, December 28, 1917

http://www.gwpda.org/memoir/Aaronsohn/aaronsohn_1917.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The WRAF - Women in the Blue

(...) By 1917, the Royal Flying Corps had all-female companies who lived at home and worked in the nearest RFC unit to them. This was to prevent any hint of impropriety from having the women billeted alongside the men, and also served to reduce costs significantly. The women in these companies were first enrolled in the RFC under Army Order 711 of 28th December 1917. The women worked alongside the men who were training them to take over their jobs. (...)

http://www.raf.mod.uk/history_old/wraf.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

115th Field Hospital (Warrior Medics)

Constituted 28 December 1917 in the Regular Army as Evacuation Hospital No. 15
Organized 21 March 1918 at Fort Riley, Kansas
Demobilized 28 June 1919 at Camp Lewis, Washington

http://www.history.army.mil/html/forcestruc/lineages/branches/hosp/0115fldhosp.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub

In the New York Evening Mail of 28 December 1917 appeared an article by H.L. Mencken entitled “A Neglected Anniversary.” The article discussed the very first American bathtub, how the bathtub had faced substantial public, medical and legal opposition, and how one was eventually installed in the White House during the administration of President Millard Fillmore.

Mencken made the whole thing up. “This article,” he wrote, “was a tissue of somewhat heavy absurdities, all of them deliberate and most of them obvious.”

“My motive,” he explained later, “was simply to have some harmless fun in war days. It never occurred to me that it would be taken seriously.” However:

Soon I began to encounter my preposterous “facts” in the writings of other men…. The chiropractors and other such quacks collared them for use as evidence of the stupidity of medical men. They were cited by medical men as proof of the progress of public hygiene. They got into learned journals and the transactions of learned societies. They were alluded to on the floor of Congress. The editorial writers of the land, borrowing them in toto and without mentioning my begetting of them, began to labor them in their dull, indignant way. They crossed the dreadful wastes of the North Atlantic, and were discussed horribly by English uplifters and German professors. Finally, they got into the standard works of reference, and began to be taught to the young.

Wendy McElroy, in The Bathtub, Mencken, and War suspects that more than “harmless fun” was behind the hoax: “Through his hoax, Mencken demonstrated to himself and to selected friends that the American public would believe any absurdity, as long as it appealed to their imagination or emotions.”

Wink Lees verder op http://sniggle.net/bathtub.php
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Martin Claude Murrills

Claude volunteered for the army during World War I. He knew he was likely to be called up and didn't fancy going to sea. From reading through letters I think that he probably joined up in June 1917.He fought in the Battle of the Somme. In He was taken ill in November 1917 through being in dreadful conditions in the trenches. He was taken to Le Havre hospital and on 28 December 1917 was transferred to a convalescent hospital in England.

I remember grandpa telling me stories of the trenches, of how a shell was fired from a canon and just missed the top of his head. An inch taller and he would have been dead. He told me how kind the nurses were when he was in hospital, they would walk into Le Havre before breakfast to get oranges for the patients.

I think that grandpa must have been shell shocked after the war. He was retired from Stead & Simpson and Nanny (as we called Fan) rented 219 London Road Lowestoft and took in boarders. Money must have been difficult. Grandpa's two sisters did not marry and had not been brought up to work, Grandpa helped them for a while but was unable to continue.

http://homepage.eircom.net/~oxbrow/Fanny1881.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Orient Cave

The Orient Cave could well be the most beautiful cave in the world. As you move through the Orient Cave, from one breathtaking chamber to one even more highly decorated, you will be awestruck! The Orient contains the astonishing Persian Chamber and Egyptian Chamber.

The Orient Cave was discovered by James Wiburd, Jack Edwards and Robert Bailey in 1904 and was opened for public inspection on 28th December 1917.

http://jenolancaves.org.au.webomatics.com/index.asp?pageID=12
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mayors of Jerusalem

Dec 9, 1917 - Dec 27, 1917 / Bill Borton (British military governor)
Dec 28, 1917 - July 1,1920 / Sir Ronald Storrs (British military governor)

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/mayorsjer.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The War Illustrated, No. 228 - 28 December 1918



http://www.rarenonfiction.com/?page=shop/flypage&product_id=157897&CLSN_758=1290665749758a2f693439bd8e638fc8
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Representation of the People Act 1918

The Representation of the People Act 1918 was an Act of Parliament passed to reform the electoral system in the United Kingdom. It is sometimes known as the Fourth Reform Act. This act was the first to practically include the majority of men in the political system and began the inclusion of women.

(...) The first election held under the new system was the 1918 general election. Polling took place on 14 December 1918, however the vote counting did not start until 28 December 1918.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Representation_of_the_People_Act_1918
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

SOUTH AFRICA'S INFLUENZA VICTIMS
By Ellen Stanton - Transcribed from an article in South Africa Magazine, 28 December 1918

We continue the sad toll of South Africa's terrible losses by the awful influenza scourge.

Mr. Adriaan Christiaan van Gorkom, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. van Gorkom, who died at Grahamstown, was a medical student at Grahamstown, where his elder brother, Willy, is also studying. Recently Mrs. Van Gorkom had a letter from the younger boy stating that Willy was ill with influenza. At the same time the news came that Adriaan had also contracted the disease and had succumbed. Of an exceptionally fine physique, standing 6 ft. 2 in., he was the embodiment of sterling manhood. As a student he promised great things. Both Willy and Adriaan were old Marist Brothers boys.

Mrs. Stuber, wife of Mr. C. Stuber, of Erinville Nurseries, Rosebank, who died at Rondebosch, took a great interest in nursing, and offered her services to the Health Department. She took up night duty for a few nights at the City Hospital. She was then asked by a friend to proceed to Worcester to nurse some private patients, and she immeditately proceeded there. After a week's absence she returned home, having contracted pneumonia, and was removed to Rondebosch Hospital, where she succumbed, and was buried at Maitland from her late residence.

As we have already reported, the epidemic victims at Pretoria include Dr. D. M. Barry, Superintendent of the Pretoria General Hospital. Dr. Barry only recovered a few weeks ago from scarlet fever and pneumonia, and had two successive attacks of influenza, the second being fatal. He came to Pretoria from Dublin a few years ago, and was most popular among a wide circle of friends.

Mr. W. S. Dickson, for many years Manager of the Jagersfontein Estate, died at the age of 66 years. The deceased was one of the oldest inhabitants in the district, and participated in the earliest diamond digging operations in Kimberley and in the opening up of the Jagersfontein Mine.

Mr. William Fraser, Inspector of Schools, Cape Province, who died at Bloemfontein, was well known in the Free State. He was on a short visit to Bloemfontein from Kimberley prior to the opening of the schools, and evidently had the disease when he arrived. He was taken to the National Hospital, where he died. He went to South Africa about 1903, being appointed Principal of Senekal School. He subsequently became an Inspector of Schools in the Free State till the advent of Responsible Government, when he left the service and organized the Council Schools, which were amalgamated in 1911. After that he obtained his appointment in the Cape.

The death took place at Germiston of Mr. Alec Stuart, senior partner in the firm of John Stuart and Son, bakers and confectioners. He leaves a widow and child, for whom much sympathy is felt. Deceased was a nephew of Dr. Spaulding, who had just been buried.

Mr. Harry M. Andrew, who died at Petersburg, aged 48 years, was for some time a junior partner in the firm of Mentz and Andrew, Attorneys in Pietersburg, the partnership being dissolved some years ago on the senior partner, who has since become Minister of Defence for the Union in the Botha Cabinet, entering politics. Mr. Andrew later acquired an extensive legal practice of his own. The deceased married, about ten years ago, a daughter of Commandant van Dam, who was Commandant of Police under the old Republican flag. The late Mr. Andrew had the misfortune recently to lose three brothers within a few days of each other - Gordon, after serving throughout the war, succumbing to wounds received in France on September 15 last; Vivian, well known in Peninsula billiard circles as a brilliant amateur cueist, dying in Cape Town of double pneumonia on October 4 last; and John, well known as a broker and commission agent at Durban, succumbing there to a short and sharp attack of influenza on October 3.

The late Commander Stephen Bowle-Evans, R.N., who died at Cape Town, was in command of the Naval Yard for some years, and in that capacity he was responsible for taking in and out of the basin a very large number of ships. He was a member of the Committee of the United Service Institute, and also of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home. He had the distinction of commissioning the first submarine, and he also served with the Prince of Wales in H.M.S. Hindustan. Whilst living in Simon's Town the deceased officer supported the Yacht, Turf, and Hunt Clubs in the Peninsula.

Dr. Phillip Roytowski, who died at Cape Town, was a brother of Attorney A. Roytowski, and eldest son of the late Mr. I. J. Roytowski, of Cape Town. He was a student at the old Normal College, Cape Town, before qualifying at Edinburgh for the medical profession. He was Acting District Surgeon at Potchefstroom, and worked strenuously at combating the outbreak of influenza until he contracted the disease.

Mr. W. F. Smith, of Goede Hoope district, Aliwal North, who died at the Marine Hotel, Somerset Strand, was President of the Aliwal North Agricultural Society, and he came to the Peninsula to attend the Agricultural Congress.

Advocate Charles Friedlander, who died at St. James', was 44 years of age, having been born at Middelburg, Cape Province, in 1874, and was the eldest son of the late Mr. J. Friedlander, J.P., of Middelburg. During the South African war he was attached to the Headquarters Staff at the Castle. He was an attorney of the late Transvaal High Court, Commissioner of the Transvaal Supreme Court, member and Chairman of the Finance Committee, Cape Town Corporation, 1903-6; in 1904 he was legal adviser to the German Consulate-General for British South Africa.

By the death of Mrs. William Rowley, wife of the proprietor of the Glencairn Hotel, his bereavement was made the more acute because just a week prior to her demise Mrs. Rowley gave birth to a son.

Mr. Morris Sandwick (better known as Maurice Maxwell), of the Ada Reeve Revue Company, who died at Kimberley was born at old Main Street, Kimberley, 24 years ago. He joined the above company on the arrival of Miss Ada Reeve at Durban, where his parents are at present residing. The late Mr. Sandwich was a fine singer, and gave promise of a very successful career on the vaudeville stage.

Mr. F. H. Dormehl, who died at Cape Town, was born in the Cape Peninsula in 1871, and was the second son of Mr. Murdoch Monson Dormehl. He was educated at the Normal School and at the South African College School. He occupied positions in the offices of the London and Lancashire Fire Assurance Company, the Reliance Assurance Company, and in the General Estate and Orphan Chamber, where he was second on the staff. In 1915, when the idea of starting a Dutch daily paper in Cape Town was first suggested, he took a very active part in helping to establish De Burger and the National Press, Limited. The first development was the establishment of Die Huguenoot, and in 1918 there followed the establishment of the Afrikaanse Handelshuis, of which he was a Director. Recently he became also a Managing Director of the South African National Trust and Assurance Company and of the African Homes Trust. Mr. Dormehl was married to a daughter of the late Rev. P. Smith, of Papendorp, and has left three daughters.

Many of those serving in East Africa contracted the disease. Among these was Staff-Sergeant Leslie Pascoe, who died at Pilgrim's Rest, in his 23rd year. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Pascoe, of the Ferreira Deep, and was born in Johannesburg. He was taken to Cornwall as a child, but came back in 1909, and was educated at St. John's College. After leaving school he was apprenticed to the engineering trade on the Ferreira Deep. The call for men for "German" East caused him to join the 9th (Sportsmen's) Battalion. He left for East Africa in February, 1916. After being invalided out of the fighting ranks he was employed at the base, and was promoted to the rank of staff-sergeant. Further attacks of fever led to his being sent home on furlough, at the conclusion of which he was discharged as unfit for further service. After his discharge he was employed as a draughtsman at the Crown Mines, and in June of this year he received an appointment to the Transvaal Gold Mining Estates at Pilgrim's Rest.

The death took place at the Krugersdorp Hospital of Mr. Thomas James Roderick, who succumbed at the age of 27 years. The deceased was well known in the Krugersdorp district, and held the post of assayer on the West Rand Consolidated Mines. He saw considerable service during the present war, and went through the Rebellion and West African campaign with the Krugersdorp Commando.

Mr. George Chandler, a popular resident of Krugersdorp, who succumbed at the Krugersdorp Hosital, had a largely-attended funeral. The pall-bearers were Messrs. A. J. Tinker, R. Holmes, E. Chater, J. Mallett, A. S. Sanson, and Holly. The service was conducted by the Rev. W. Smart.

By the death of Mrs. M. A. Phil, Germiston lost probably its oldest resident. The deceased lady, who was 67 years of age, went to Germiston 30 years ago, when the house she resided in was almost the only one then existing. She was the mother of Mrs. J. A. Human, Germiston.

Mrs. Herapath, who died at Berea, was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Turner of that place. About ten days previous to her death she left with other nurses for Middelburg, Transvaal, to do duty there during the epidemic, but she fell a victim to the disease. The news is all the more distressing as she was only married about six months ago to Lieutenant C. H. Herapath, who is at present in East Africa.

Mr. Alec Stuart, partner in the well-known firm of John Stuart and Son, who died at his residence, Germiston South, was only 27 years of age. A younger brother of deceased, Mr. Jock Stuart, who served in East Africa, was seriously ill with influenza, but recovered. The late Dr. Spaulding, who was buried a week before, was an uncle of the deceased.

Mr. William Rowe, lately second in command of the Johannesburg Fire Brigade Department, died at Cape Town. Mr. Rowe only retired on pension from the Brigade on September 30, and he left for the Cape on October 4.

Private Harry Reginald Forder, South African Infantry, who died at Yeoville, was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Forder, of that town. Deceased who had just passed his 21st birthday, had served for over two years in France in the ranks of the South African Infantry. Invalided home last November on account of a strained heart, the disease found an easy victim. He was educated at the Christian Brothers' College, Kimberley, and the Marist Brothers' School, Uitenhage.

Mrs. Judith Cuthbert, who died at Heidelberg, was the widow of Mr. Cuthbert, Inspector of Railway Schools. She was returning from Durban, where she had attended as a delegate a conference of the Presbyterian Church Women's Association, and was taken ill in the train, but continued her journey to her son at Heidelberg, Cape Province. She leaves two sons and two daughters.

Mr. William Keery, who died at the New Somerset Hospital, came to South Africa from Lisburn, Ireland, about 25 years ago. He was with the firm of A. R. McKenzie and Co., for some years afterwards commanding business at the docks as a coal merchant, which business he carried on to the time of his death. He leaves a widow and three children.

Amongst the Port Elizabeth victims was Mr. Walter Gilchrist Wyatt-Watts, one of the employes of Messrs. Adolph Mosenthal and Co., in whose service he had been for about 15 years. He was the eldest son of Mr. Walter Watts, of Fauresmith, Orange Free State. Educated at St. Andrew's College, Grahamstown, he started life as a junior clerk with Messrs. Mosenthal's. The deceased leaves a widow - the eldest daughter of Mr. Roger Ascham - and a little girl of six or seven summers.

Mr. Thomas James Roderick, who died at Krugersdorp, was assayer at the West Rand Consolidated Mines, and prior to the war was well known in local Rugby football circles. He saw considerable service in the recent campaigns, and was through the Rebellion and West and East Africa.

http://www.genealogyworld.net/write/flu_e.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World War 1: American Soldier's Letters Home

Letter written December 28, 1918

Dear Mother -:

As Kipling says there is “another mocking Xmas past”, and although it wasn’t nearly as bad as last year’s it was far from pleasant or anything that I would like to go thru with again. This year at least I had the advantage of being with friends which is something, while last year I had just arrived in a new outfit and knew practically nobody. However, try as one may somehow you can’t seem to put any cheer into Christmas away from home. It is easy enough to celebrate the armistice as a victory or something of that variety but Christmas falls flat. Moreover the environment this year wasn’t particularly of an inspiring nature. The Germans, tho I have a hunch it is their big day, weren’t at all enthusiastic in their demonstrations and rather naturally we didn’t do things for the children as we did in France. We staged a horse show in the morning and a large egg nog party. Some seven gallons being consumed without great effort or effect. In the afternoon we had a motor exhibition and an extraordinarily large amount of punch which held its chief merit apparently in its ability to depress. Our dinner at evening was rather splendid from the point of view of decorations and food, and there were thirty officers present. The room was draped with evergreen and on the table were three little very much ornamented trees such as we used to have on the table at home. Somehow tho everyone got more or less engrossed in his own thoughts and the excitement did not run high. Such was the day and I am tremendously glad it is over. As I said tho, it was an improvement and perhaps after a few more years I may begin to enjoy it again.

I hope you had the party at home just the same and everything went off in O.K. style, for certainly that is an occasion and one that I enjoyed always almost more than any other. I managed to go back to Coblenz a few days ago and got some presents for you all but the means at hand for sending them are still lacking as I don’t want to risk them by the ordinary mail and I am not yet able to register them. This peace time warfare somehow isn’t all that it is cracked up to be. True enough there are no more flaming, roaring dawns or hideous nights but after all that you can’t imagine how time drags – every day is just about like every other day and you feel pretty sure that the days coming are going to be just about like the ones just past. War is a horrible thing and I never want to see any more of it but nevertheless there is a terrible fascination in it. You may lie down to sleep and sleep peacefully until late the next morning or you may never wake up, or again you may be waked up in ten minutes and start on something absolutely different from anything you have ever done before. I suppose that as a matter of fact it is the lack of thrills and excitement now that palls but certainly there is something. On the other hand I am living more comfortably than I almost ever have anywhere else. The Major, a Capt. Delong and I have three rooms, two small bedrooms and a huge living room which is all hung with at least 20 heads of very good deer, boar, etc., and finished in dark wood and light blue of which very little shows. The house is owned by two splendid old ladies who treat us as tho we were their children.

I am enclosing another little picture of myself which I had taken back in Picardy last July at a little place called Beauvoir where we all had a wonderful time and were very happy even tho the fighting just there wasn’t exactly what one would term quiet.

This is about all there is to tell you just at this minute but I will write you again very soon and in the meantime will continue my serial story.

With love
Paul

http://wwar1letters.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2009-01-01T00%3A00%3A00-08%3A00&updated-max=2010-01-01T00%3A00%3A00-08%3A00&max-results=2
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Belgische vluchtelingen in Dordrecht
door Ad van den Boogaard

(...) Op 8 november 1918 verzoekt de burgemeester nederig aan de commissie van toezicht of een Belgische vluchtelinge van 11 jaar, bij wijze van uitzondering f 0,35 per dag ondersteuning kan krijgen. De ouders van het kind zijn in Engeland en kunnen haar niet ondersteunen en de Dordtse weduwe, bij wie zij in huis is, kan dit ook niet. Het verzoek wordt toegestaan! Op 18 december 1918 moeten de burgemeesters inventariseren, welke ondersteuning zij hebben gegeven aan Belgische en Franse vluchtelingen. Dit moet apart worden opgegeven, omdat de Franse regering de ondersteuning vermoedelijk zal terugbetalen. De commissie meldt op 28 december 1918 aan de burgemeester, dat een bij de blikfabriek werkloos geworden Belg nog tot 4 januari 1919 ondersteuning krijgt. Het gezin krijgt ook reisgeld om terug te keren naar Antwerpen. Het alternatief is opname in een vluchtoord. Er zijn enkele voorbeelden bekend van Belgen, die in Dordrecht werk hadden gevonden en die ook na het einde van de oorlog daar zijn blijven wonen. (...)

http://www.wereldoorlog1418.nl/vluchtelingen/dordrecht.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The November revolution, 1918/1919

On 28 December 1918, the alliance between the MSPD and the USPD in the provisional government
collapsed when the USPD withdrew from the Council of People’s Representatives because of
differences over a military operation. The conflict over the future course of the revolution escalated
into what became known as the Spartacist Revolt of January 1919, when troops of the MSPD government waged bloody battles with representatives of the USPD and the Communist KPD, the government troops being assisted by the right-wing Freikorps. On 15 and 16 January 1919, Freikorps troops murdered the KPD leaders Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919) and Karl Liebknecht (1871-1919).

http://www.bundestag.de/htdocs_e/artandhistory/history/factsheets/november_revolution.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Woodgate History 1918 - prize potato growers of oneida county, dec 28 1918



http://www.midyork.org/woodgate/wg_hist_rec/wg_history_1918/pages/prize%20potato%20growers%20of%20oneida%20county%20dec%2028%201918.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Krantenknipsels Emmer-Courant 1911-1918

28-12 [1918] - Arr. Rechtbank, Assen. Zitting 23 Dec.
In den nacht van 22 op 23 Aug. hebben Lubbert H. en Grietje B. te B.C. zich schuldig gemaakt aan diefstal van een hoeveelheid te veld staande aardappelen toebehoorende aan H.J. Robben. De beklaagden zijn heden niet verschenen. Na het hooren van getuige Robben eiste het O.M. voor ieder der beklaagden 1 maand gevangenisstraf.

Heeft niets met bovenstaande post te maken... http://www.xs4all.nl/~fjmblom/krantenknipsels_Emmer-Courant1918.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Dec 2010 23:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Citizens of Smyrni visit the destroyer "Leon", the first Greek ship arrived at the harbor of Smyrni, 28th of December 1918



http://smyrni.s5.com/Greek%20Navy.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Dec 2010 0:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Soldier's Mail - Letters Home from a New England Doughboy 1916-1919

Chauffort, France 12/28/1918

Dear Em

Here is another to let you know that Im still O.K. and back with the company again. Left the hospital yesterday and feel a great deal more at home than I did while away which was just a week. We just got back form the Y.M.C.A. Hut where the band gave a concert and six pictures were shown. It was a very good show, for us and every one enjoyed every minute of it. Winter is here in earnest now and if you was here tonight you would agree with me. It snowed the night before last, was cold all day yesterday and today, and now, there is a strong wind blowing, with snow and rain to make it more dismal. There is a very good fire going here though and I am very comfortable.

There are four of us at this table now writing letters which shows that we are all in about the same mood this stormy night. We have been stationed in this little town (which is about thirty miles from Neufchateau, or where we were stationed last winter at this time) for over a month and it is getting to be like home to us. I suppose we will stay here until we leave for home, which will please me alright for I don’t fancy moving in this kind of weather. The papers must have given an account of the President’s visit to this area and it sure was a buisy day for all conserned.

Say Em a nice blazing fire in a large fire place (for this is all you find in these small towns) sure does make you feel comfortable don’t it? Can you picture us these cold dreary nights all sitting around this fire place (there are sometimes as many as ten in the circle) talking of home and past experiences, or telling stories to keep things interesting, every eye on the blazing logs as if they would disappear if we did otherwise. Yes we squat around this fire as if it was life itself and kill these last (and I hope few) nights in battle torn France.

Im up to my old tricks again now. While at the front we were lucky to get a wash once a week, but today (and it can continue) I washed a suit of underwear, O.D. shirt, pair of stockings, half dozen nose cloths and a towel. Pretty soft though. Throw them into a pail, boil them over this fire, and a peace of soap and brush does the trick. It is eleven oclock now so I guess Ill close this letter, worm into a place at the fire for a few minutes for a shin roast before I roll in.

I hope this letter finds you all o.k. and that the winter over there is not as severe as it was last. Give my regards to all and tell them that I am the same

Sam.
Samuel E. Avery #69762, Hdq Co. 103rd Inf. A.E.F.

http://worldwar1letters.wordpress.com/2009/12/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Dec 2010 0:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

28 December 1919 → Written Answers (Commons)

UNIDENTIFIED SOLDIERS (MENTAL TROUBLE).


HC Deb 28 December 1919 vol 123 cc1264-5W 1264W

Major GLYN asked the Secretary of State for War if, after consultation with the Minister of Health, and the Home Secretary, he can state how many men, if any, having served in any branch of the Army, are now under care in institutions, having lost their memories or from other causes have lost their identity?

Mr. CHURCHILL I understand my hon. and gallant Friend to refer to discharged unidentified soldiers in asylums or other institutions, and it so I can assure him that no such cases exist. As stated in a written reply to a question asked by the hon. and gallant Member for Tottenham, North, on the 19th December, there are three cases of soldiers 1265W unidentified owing to mental trouble. These have not been discharged from the Army, but are retained in a military hospital.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1919/dec/28/unidentified-soleiers-mental-trouble
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Dec 2010 0:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Elisabethufer, 1913



Beschrijving: Ernst Ludwig Kirchner: Elisabethufer, 1913, Pinakothek der Moderne, München
Datum: 28 december 2008

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bestand:Ernst_Ludwig_Kirchner_Elisabethufer_1913-1.jpg
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