Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

[VC] Sapper William Hackett

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Commonwealth Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2009 21:13    Onderwerp: [VC] Sapper William Hackett Reageer met quote

Dat we nog geen apart topic over deze man hebben, snel verandering in brengen:

[VC] Sapper William Hackett

http://forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=20589

Of all the acts of heroism that have been rewarded with a Victoria Cross, it is, perhaps, the most noble.

Entombed 40ft beneath the killing fields of the Western Front when the tunnel he was in caved in, Sapper William Hackett spurned the opportunity to crawl to safety in order to remain behind to comfort a wounded comrade, before a second collapse sealed the two men in forever.

Now, the full story of this extraordinary act can be told for the first time after the chance discovery of a diary written by another soldier, which chronicles the event. The unit's war diary from the time has been lost and the diary has provided the only known account of Sapper Hackett's "almost divine act of self sacrifice".
At 2.50am on June 22nd 1916 he and four other tunnellers were digging towards the German lines in the Givenchy sector, in northern France, when an enemy mine exploded, collapsing the tunnel they were in. Eventually, a rescue party dug its way towards them and made contact through a small hole, through which Sapper Hackett helped three comrades to safety.

However, with sanctuary beckoning and although himself unhurt, he refused to leave without the last man, seriously injured 22-year-old Thomas Collins, who was too wounded to get through the hole.

Repeated artillery barrages from the Germans forced the rescuers back to the surface, leaving the two men below. Eventually, the shaft collapsed, and rescue efforts had to be abandoned, leaving the two men to their fate below.

The newly-discovered diary was written by Sapper John French, who was in the same unit as Sapper Hackett, 254 Tunnelling Company, Royal Engineers, and was involved in the rescue attempts. It was found among the possessions of his sister, following her recent death, and given to the Redruth Old Cornwall Society Museum, where it has been studied by historians.

Its discovery follows another development, when battlefield archaeologists using ground-penetrating radar, pinpointed the location of the collapsed tunnel, ahead of the construction of a new memorial to commemorate Sapper Hackett and other British tunnellers, due to be unveiled next summer.

In understated fashion, the diary chronicles the "heart breaking" attempts, over the space of five days, to reach the men and the "heroic" decision by Sapper Hackett, from Nottingham, once the rescuers had reached the group, to remain behind.

On June 22, rescuers are able to make contact with the five men and speak to them through an air pipe. The diary reveals that among the threats the stranded men faced was drowning, as the rescuers had to pump air in and water out.

The next day, Sapper French wrote: "Those five men are still entombed. We have been working night and day trying to get them out. It is 25 feet to go & we are in 15, but it is very slow work owing to so much broken timber and running muck (loose earth or quicksand). They are still alive and we can speak to them."

On June 24th, Sapper French records that the team reached the men and were able to get three men out, as well as Sapper Hackett's fateful decision to remain behind. He wrote: "Got out three of the five men last night. One of the others [Thomas Collins] had some ribs broken & could not crawl through the very small hole that had been driven through. The other fellow [William Hackett] offered to stop in with him until they could make the hole bigger so they passed in some food to them. They had no sooner done that than there was another fall & they were entombed again."

The next day, he wrote: "Those two fellows still entombed. Had to start a new gallery to try & get to them but with the water & running muck it is a heart breaking job. We cannot get any answer from them now. Men are working hard at it night and day. Fritz keeps on sending over rifle grenades & trench mortars all the time."

The next day, he added: "Still trying to get through to those two men, but it is painfully slow, we can't get any answer from them."

On June 27th, he wrote: "Abandoned all hope of getting those two chaps out this morning & stopped all rescue work for the condition of the shaft was so bad as to endanger the lives of the men working down there and they think that they are both dead. That chap Hackett died a hero for he could have come out with the others but would not leave his injured comrade."

One extra detail provided by Sapper Hackett's VC citation were his words to the rescue team as he turned down the opportunity to save himself: "I am a tunneller and must look after the others first."

Peter Barton, an historian who has been researching the tunnellers for 30 years, said: "None of this was known until now. This is the only account of Hackett's action. Until now, it was a hidden, almost private act.

"I describe this as the most noble of all Victoria Crosses, because it involved no enemy action. It was not about the adrenalin rush of an attack, with shells bursting around, and so on.

"This was an act of heroism that occurred in silence and in darkness, 40ft below ground. This was an entirely different type of valour that was supremely noble. It was an almost divine act of self sacrifice. It is absolutely unimaginable."

Geoffrey Hackett, 64 and from Nottingham, who is a great great nephew of Sapper Hackett, said: "The diary really brings it home, what happened. It tells the grim story with a day by day account and shows how people were feeling at the time. You can't make the story any more dramatic than it actually was.

"But I like to think that my relative's VC is to help remember that there were a lot of tunnellers who weren't remembered because their work had to be secret."

Mr Barton and archaeologists from Glasgow University have located the collapsed mine and the historian is currently involved in raising money for a memorial in honour of those involved in the "underground war".

Both sides made extensive use of tunnels in an effort to break the stalemate of the Western Front. So-called "fighting trenches" were dug to plant explosives beneath the enemy positions.

Mr Barton said: "Tunnelling was the most barbaric form of warfare there was. It was secret and little known about at the time and that remains. We are only now hearing the stories."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/onthefrontline/6521298/Remembrance-Sunday-real-story-emerges-behind-most-noble-Victoria-Cross-hero.html

Bedankt shabu voor het artikel!
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2009 21:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ploegsteert Memorial
A memorial to the 11.447 British soldiers who fell in the Ploegsteert Wood area and surroundings.
It was unveiled on the 7th june 1931, the anniversary of the battle of Mesen.
On the memorial the names of a number of VC winners :
Sapper William Hackett, of the 24th Tunneling Company
Private James McKenzie, of the Scots Guards
Captain Thomas Tennant Pryce, who also received the MC with Bar
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2009 21:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sapper William Hackett speelt een grote rol in dit boek van Peter Barton en Johan vandeWalle, hét standaardboek over de ondergrondse oorlog.

Beneath Flanders Fields

Het is het verhaal van de enige mol die ooit het Victoria Cross ontving: 136414 Sapper William Hackett, van 254 Tunnelling Compagnie RE - de meest echte 'alledaagse' tunneller, die er bestaan heeft.

Als mijnwerker van Manvers Main Colliery in Mexborough nabij Rotherham, gehuwd met Alice, vader van twee kinderen, Mary en Arthur. Dealnietemin was William Hacket vastberaden om zijn land te dienen, alhoewel hij de keuze had thuis blijven gezien zijn leeftijd en beroep dat hem vrijstelling gaf.
Vier maal werd hij afgewezen door het York en Lancaster Regiment vanwege zijn leeftijd. Hij probeerde bij de vijfde poging de sappers - welke meer dan bereid waren om een stabiele, bedreven en ervaren mijnwerker op te nemen. In oktober 1915, na minder dan een maand in uniform, was hij al in actieve dienst met 254 TC in Givenchy.
In mei 1916 sloeg het noodlot toe bij de familie; Arthur, veertien jaar oud, die was gaan werken in de kolenmijnen om de familie te onderhouden, werd geraakt door een losgeslagen mijntruck. De verwondingen waren ernstig; Arthur's rechterbeen moest geamputeerd worden. Zijn vader, die tweemaal een val van een dak overleefd had tijdens zijn eigen burgerlijke mijncarrière, kon onmogelijk zijn zoon bezoeken. Net als duizenden andere Britse soldaten, kon William Hackett lezen noch schrijven en zijn brieven naar huis werden gemaakt door een vriend, Sapper J R Evans.


Ik hoop mevrouw Hackett dat de brieven die ik schrijf voor uw echtgenoot juist zijn want hij zegt me nooit wat erin te zetten. Ik weet dat het niet is alsof hij ze zelf zou schrijven en ik weet dat het zeer harde zinnen moeten zijn die hij niet kan schrijven...
Februari 1916. Het is zeer hard dat zijn been eraf is maar God weet het wel het beste... het is zeer hard voor mij om in een vreemd land te zijn en een kind in het ziekenhuis te hebben... ik kan hem niet helpen maar ik weet dat je alles zult doen wat je kunt.
Maart 1916. We zullen de dingen van de zonnige kant moeten bekijken en bidden voor het beste weet je, want al onze levens zijn vol van problemen ik wou, dat ze in godsnaam allemaal voorbij waren en de oorlog is nog maar net begonnen sinds ik hier ben maar de jongeman die voor mij schrijft zegt dat het net hetzelfde was als vorig jaar maar liefste Vrouw er zal nogal wat bloed vergoten worden binnenkort en ze hebben niet de bedoeling om er nog veel langer mee door te gaan en ze denken dat allemaal ook en voor mij kan het niet snel genoeg gedaan zijn want we hebben er allemaal genoeg van. .....


Sapper William Hackett stierf enkele weken nadat deze laatste brief ontvangen was. Deze tragedie gebeurde op 23 juni 1916 in de Shaftesbury schacht nabij de Red Dragon Krater, een deel van het Givenchy mijnsysteem in Frans Vlaanderen. De Shaftesbury mijn was een nieuw project voor de 254 Tunnelling Compagnie. De zijtunnels waren nog steeds niet afgewerkt maar de hoofdboring was goed vooruitgegaan Tot op een punt, bijna tweederde door niemandsland, waar een Duitse mijnexplosie de galerij deed schudden. Vier van de vijf man die op dat moment beneden aan het werk waren, keerden terug naar hun schacht om te ontdekken dat deze zwaar beschadigd was.
Aarde en klei gleed door gebroken houten stutbalken de schacht in. De vijfde, Sapper Thomas Collins, behorende tot het 254 TC van het 14e Bataljon, The Welsh Regiment, was zwaargewond door de ontploffing en zat klem.
Zonder zijdelingse tunnels die een extra uitgang boden, was de Shaftesbury schacht de enige weg naar de oppervlakte en de veiligheid.
_________________
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2009 21:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

254 Tunnelling Companie, 22e juni/23e juni 1916.
Nadat de vijand een mijn opgeblazen had, waren hij en vier anderen begraven. Een reddingsteam werd naar de vastzittende mijnwerkers gezonden en zonder acht te slaan op hun eigen veiligheid bereikten ze de mijnwerkers spoedig. Drie van hen werden teruggetrokken maar Hackett weigerde de mijn te verlaten tot zijn kameraad, die zwaargewond was, gered was.
'Ik ben een tunneller, ik moet eerst voor de anderen zorgen'.
Jammer genoeg, ten gevolge van de vijandelijke activiteit op deze specifieke plaats, was de reddings¬ploeg verplicht terug te trekken en de CO was met tegenzin gedwongen om het goede werk stop te zetten en, helaas, we hebben een held en zijn kameraad verloren.
De Sapper, 1917


William Hackett was dood. De week daarop schreef Sapper Evans opnieuw naar Alice, maar dit keer was de brief geschreven als een persoonlijke boodschap van hemzelf.


146205 Sapper JR Evans, 2e Sectie, 254 Tunnelling Compagnie RE, BEF, 3e juli. Beste mevrouw Hackett, Het spijt me ten zeerste dat ik u onder deze omstandigheden moet informeren dat uw Echtgenoot Sapper Hackett gedood werd in actie op 22 juni maar ik kan u vertellen dat hij stierf als een held, zo heldhaftig als er iemand ooit in deze oorlog stierf waarvan ik hoop dat u binnenkort meer zult horen. En ik kan u zeggen dat de dood van uw Echtgenoot ten zeerste betreurd wordt want hij werd door alle officieren en mannen van 254 Compagnie erg gerespec¬teerd en wat mezelf betreft ik mis hem zo zeer alsof hij mijn eigen vader was want zoals u weet schreef ik zijn brieven voor hem. En alle jongens van zijn sectie willen dat ik u hun beste groeten overbreng en hopen dat u en de
kinderen in goede gezondheid verkeren en veel geluk mogen hebben en hopen dat u zult proberen het droevige nieuws goed te dragen.
En ze vragen me u te zeggen dat u heel trots kunt zijn over de manier waarop uw man gestorven is want hij was de grootste held die er was. Ik wou alleen dat ik u meer kon vertellen over hoe het gebeurd is maar zoals u weet mogen we dat niet doen maar als ik dit alles goed doorkom zal ik u komen bezoeken en u alles vertellen.
Wel Mevrouw Hackett ik
moet hierbij afsluiten door u en de kinderen het beste te wensen.
Ik verblijf hoogachtend.

JR Evans

Het reddingsteam was naar de schacht teruggekeerd toen het bombardement stopte en werkte vier dagen om de twee mannen te bevrijden. Alle pogingen mislukten. Op 29 november 1916 nam Alice Hackett stilletjes het postuum toegekende VC in ontvangst uit de handen van George V in Buckingham Palace. Sapper Hackett bleef in herinnering bij zijn kameraden omdat hij weigerde een gewonde makker alleen te laten in het donker......


William Hackett was 43 jaar oud toen hij stierf. Zijn lichaam, en dat van Thomas Collins, die pas 22 was, werd nooit teruggevonden en beiden liggen nog steeds in hun 'eeuwig stille tunnels' in Givenchy. Hackett is vereeuwigd op paneel 1 van het Ploegsteert Monument voor de Vermisten nabij Armentières, en Collins op het Thiepval Monument aan de Somme. Waarom de twee mannen die samen stierven niet samen herdacht worden is niet bekend. Het is toepasselijk dat enkele van de laatste woorden in dit boek van Sir Norton-Griffiths komen, die met zijn visie en onvermoeibaarheid de tunnellers vormde tot de opmerkelijke en kameraadschappelijke band die ze geworden zijn. In een telegram naar Ralph Stokes in 1921 schreef hij, ter ondersteuning van het idee een Tunneller's Register te maken,:

Samenwerking en register schitterend idee. Voor de claykickers heeft geen enkel beeld ter wereld ooit de moed, draagkracht en toewij¬ding aan de dienst kunnen weergeven, en geen enkel leger moest meer verdragen. Een stille toast op allen die gedenken aan een glorieus feit in hun eeuwig stille tunnels.
Sir John Norton - Griffiths.

Uit Beneath Flanders Fields:
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=833
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 08 Nov 2009 21:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Tunnellers’ Memorial, Givenchy
A fund for the erection of a permanent memorial to William Hackett VC
and the Tunnelling Companies of the First World War.
\



Sapper William Hackett VC
here is no permanent memorial on the Western Front to the extraordinary work of the Royal Engineers tunnellers. Help us commemorate their achievements by donating to the Tunnellers Memorial Fund. Details of the proposed memorial can be found on this site. The memorial is expected to be unveiled in the summer of 2010.
http://www.tunnellersmemorial.com/Default.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Jan 2010 13:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Laatste nieuws:

The memorial will be unveiled at Givenchy on Saturday 19 June 2010. Timings and details will be advised on the website later once arrangements have been finalised. All are welcome to attend this unique event.

http://www.tunnellersmemorial.com/
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
shabu
Cheffin


Geregistreerd op: 7-2-2006
Berichten: 3038
Woonplaats: Hoek van Holland

BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Jan 2010 21:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hee dit toopic nooit gezien...
Leuk dat je er meer over gevonden hebt Yvonne Smile
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Mei 2010 22:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Is this the bravest VC of them all?
First World War soldier gets full memorial 94 years after dying UNDER German trench

By Chris Brooke on 4th May 2010

He was the bravest of the brave.

Having turned 40 by the outbreak of World War One, Sapper William Hackett had been considered too old to go to war and was even diagnosed as having a heart condition by army doctors.

But his determination to 'do his bit' for King and country on the Western Front led to him joining an elite group of skilled miners whose job was to blow up German trenches by digging tunnels beneath no man's land.

Hackett showed extraordinary courage when he sacrificed his life to stay with an injured colleague in a collapsed tunnel.

He died a hero in June 1916 at the age of 43 and was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

His VC was was described as 'the most deserving out all those awarded in the war' by eminent historian Peter Barton who has written several books about the conflict.

Now a slate memorial is being built in Givenchy, northern France, on the spot where Sapper Hackett died after a campaign led by a number of prominent historians and military leaders raised £24,000.

For 94 years his remains, and that of fellow tunneller Thomas Collins, have laid unmarked beneath a foreign field.

That will be put right on June 19th when the memorial will be officially unveiled.

While millions of brave young men made the ultimate sacrifice during the Great War, Hackett's story stands out as among the most remarkable.

Born in Nottingham in 1873, he became a coal miner at the age of 18 and later moved to Mexborough, South Yorkshire, with his wife Alice and two children.

In 1914, when war was declared on Germany, he tried three times to enlist but was considered too old to join the infantry.

By 1915 there was a desperate need to recruit miners to dig tunnels to attack enemy lines from below the surface with bombs - a tactic which featured in the best-selling novel Birdsong.

Hackett was accepted into the Royal Engineers and was despatched to France after a fortnight's training.

His moment of supreme bravery would come a year later. Sapper Hackett and four other men were digging a tunnel 40ft below the surface towards enemy lines when a mine exploded on top of them.

The men were entombed underground but rescuers managed to make a hole through the fallen earth and broken timber, after 20 hours of solid digging.

They made contact with their trapped comrades and Sapper Hackett, who was not injured, helped three of the men out to safety.

He could have followed them but refused to leave the fourth man, a seriously injured 22-year-old, saying:'I am a tunneller and must look after the others first.'

They stayed there for four days as rescuers worked to get the injured man out. Eventually the tunnel and shaft collapsed and the two trapped men died.

William Hackett could have left on several occasions, but insisted on staying with his injured friend.

In a letter to his family, his section commander Captain GM Edwardes wrote:'His fearless conduct and wonderful selfsacrifice must always be a source of pride and comfort to you all.'

Asked later by a local paper reporter about her heroic husband, Mrs Hackett replied:'I could never understand the doctors rejecting him on account of his heart. There wasn't much wrong with that, was there?'

Mr Barton said: 'This has been a five-year-long project and the amount of support we have had from a great number of people has been amazing.

'The memorial is to honour the tunnellers, and in particular Sapper Hackett, who fought a war underground that not many people are aware of.
'I think his VC medal was the most deserved out all those awarded in the war. That is not to discredit the others, which were deservedly rewarded, but Sapper Hackett's actions on that day were of the most noble kind.

'We still don't know what killed them, they may have died in the tunnel collapse, asphyxiation or even flooding. I don't think anyone can really identify with what these soldiers had to go through in terms of charging all guns blazing at the enemy.

'But I do think we can relate to being in claustrophobic place. And this is where his moment of supreme bravery came, not on the battlefield, but some metres below in the cold and dark."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1272320/Bravest-soldier-WWI-gets-memorial-94-years-dying-UNDER-German-trench.html?ITO=1490
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
den Korrigann



Geregistreerd op: 19-11-2006
Berichten: 1110
Woonplaats: Roeselare

BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Jun 2010 20:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Even omhoog geschopt, 19 juni nadert zeer snel.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Jul 2010 16:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

En bedankt voor de prachtige foto's, het monument ziet er schitterend uit:
http://forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=22518
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Sep 2010 12:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sapper William Hackett was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross by George V but for 94 years his body has laid unmarked in No Mens Land.
His VC was described as "the most deserving out all those awarded in the war "by historian Peter Barton, who has written several books about the conflict.



Now a memorial is to be built in Givenchy in Northern France on the spot where Sapper Hackett died after a campaign led by a number of prominent historians and military leaders raised the required funds.
Sapper Hackett, a former miner from Mexborough, near Rotherham, was originally rejected three times by the York and Lancaster Regiment when he tried to join the Army because he was over-age at 42.
But he finally managed to join the war effort when he enlisted in the Royal Engineers tunnelling companies in 1915.

His moment of supreme bravery would come a year later while fighting on the Western Front at Givenchy, France on June 27, 1916.
Sapper Hackett, aged 43, and four other men were digging a tunnel towards enemy lines when a mine exploded on top of them.
The men were entombed underground but managed to make a hole through the fallen earth and broken timber, after 20 hours of solid digging.
They made contact with their comrades on the ground and Sapper Hackett helped three of the men out of the hole.
He could have followed them but refused to leave the fourth man, who had been seriously injured, saying: "I am a tunneller and must look after the others first."

The hole was getting smaller, yet he still refused to leave his injured comrade and the earth finally collapsed on top of them.
A rescue party worked desperately for four days but they could not reach the two men who still remain buried there to this day.
Mr Barton said: "This has been a five-year-long project and the amount of support we have had from a great number of people has been amazing.
"The memorial is to honour the tunnellers, and in particular Sapper Hackett, who fought a war underground that not many people are aware of.
"I think his VC medal was the most deserved out all those awarded in the war.
That is not to discredit the others, which were deservedly rewarded – but Sapper Hackett's actions on that day were of the most noble kind."
"We still don't know what killed them, they may have died in the tunnel collapse, asphyxiation or even flooding.
"I don't think anyone can really identify with what these soldiers had to go through in terms of charging all guns blazing at the enemy. But I do think we can relate to being in claustrophobic place.

"And this is where his moment of supreme bravery came, not on the battlefield, but some metres below in the cold and dark."
The posthumous Victoria Cross was presented to Sapper Hackett's widow Alice at Buckingham Palace on November 29, 1916. field-marshal Sir Evelyn Wood VC later said his actions were "The most divine-like act of self- sacrifice.

The VC medal is kept at the Royal Engineers Museum in Gillingham. The memorial will be officially unveiled at Givenchy on Saturday, June 19.












c)
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/7676843/First-World-War-hero-to-be-honoured-with-memorial-in-France.html

(Published: 8:57AM BST 04 May 2010)
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Commonwealth Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group