Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

5 juni
Ga naar Pagina Vorige  1, 2
 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 10:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

University of Glasgow: Great War Fallen Commemoration

05/06/1917 - 2nd Lieutenant - James Robertson Gauld Sim - 3rd Bn. Royal Scots - 5 June 1917
05/06/1917 - Captain George Stewart - 26th Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers (Tyneside Irish) - 5 June 1917

https://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_527604_en.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 10:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

James Arthur Firth - Bradford Grammar School

Gunner 781447, ‘A’ Battery 311th Brigade
Royal Field Artillery.


James Firth was born in the Dirk Hill area of Great
Horton on 16th March 1893. His parents were Henry
Spurr Firth and Mary Ellen (nee Gill). Henry’s family
came from Horbury near Wakefield where his father
was a cordwainer (that is, he made new shoes).
Henry worked with him before moving to Bradford in
the 1860s, where for more than thirty years he
worked as a wool-carding machine overlooker. He
married Mary Ellen Gill, a worsted weaver, in 1871.
Her father and both grandfathers were all woolcombers,
which may explain how she and Henry
met. Over the next twenty years Henry and Mary
had eleven children, of whom eight survived. James
was the youngest, and the fifth son. He was the only
one to go to Bradford Grammar School, where he
was a pupil from 1905 to 1908. He showed promise
in Forms Third and Fourth Modern, and at the end of
his first year he was runner-up for the both the form
and the first year boys’ prizes. In his third and final
year his achievements declined, and he left school
aged fifteen to work as a clerk for Messrs. Kessler
and Co., a wool importer with two warehouses in
Little Germany.

James was twenty-one and living with his parents at
St Margaret’s Place in Horton when the war began.
He did not volunteer until the fighting had been going
on for more than a year. When he did enlist in
October 1915 the Government had begun to move
towards compelling men to fight through the Derby
Scheme, so he may have decided to go while he still
had a say in the matter. His choice fell on the Royal
Field Artillery, perhaps as a way of avoiding the
trenches. He enlisted in the Territorial Force 2/2nd
West Riding Brigade based at Valley Parade in
Bradford. In 1916 it was renamed 311th Brigade. It
was part of 62nd West Riding Division’s artillery
support, and in early January 1917 the whole
division crossed to France. At the end of January
311th Brigade became an Army Field Artillery
Brigade and over the following months it
supplemented the artillery of divisions from several
different Corps which were making attacks.

Firth embarked for France on 6th January 1917. On
15th February he was admitted to a Field Ambulance
suffering from a high temperature, a condition which
was known as ‘trench fever’ - he returned to service
four days later. He served with ‘A’ Battery which was
equipped with six of the principal British field piece,
the 18 pounder Quick Firing gun. From the start of
April 1917, Firth’s battery was almost constantly in
action, firstly supporting the opening phase of the
Battle of Arras north of the River Scarpe, and
subsequently attacks on Gavrelle and Oppy. It was
not until 19th May that they were withdrawn and were
able to rest to some extent as they moved northwards
by road to Nieppe, close to the Belgian frontier. There
they took up battery positions in support of the New
Zealand Division. The Brigade War Diary reports on
5th June, ‘Very heavy shelling of battery position by
enemy.’ Although it reports no casualty figures, this
must have been what caused Firth’s death. He was
one of five men from 311th Brigade killed on the
same day and who were buried in Strand Military
Cemetery, near Ploegsteert. At least two of his
brothers also served during the war. They both
survived.

http://www.bradfordgrammar.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/1917-June-5-Firth-JA-115.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 10:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

TRESSIDER F (Private) - Northumberland Fusiliers - killed in action 5 June 1917

Formuliertje... https://discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au/browse/records/211076
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 10:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Arab Revolt, 1916-18

The Arab Revolt began on 5 June 1916. Forces commanded by Sharif Hussein ibn Ali’s sons, the emirs Ali and Feisal, attacked the Ottoman garrison at Medina in an attempt to seize the holy city and its railway station. After three days the Arabs broke off their attacks, and the commander of the 12,000-strong Ottoman garrison, General Fakhri Pasha, sent Turkish troops out of the city to pursue the retreating rebels.

Meanwhile, Sharif Hussein ibn Ali publicly proclaimed the revolt on 10 June in Mecca. His forces were more successful there, seizing the city and forcing the small Ottoman garrison to seek refuge in the local fortress. Another of Hussein’s sons, Emir Abdullah, surrounded and besieged the town of Ta’if.

At the same time rebel clans allied to Sharif Hussein attacked Jiddah and other ports along the Arabian coast of the Red Sea. Both sides recognised the importance of the Red Sea ports and the British immediately dispatched a naval flotilla – including the seaplane carrier HMS Ben-My-Chree – to support the Arab forces. The ships bombarded Turkish fortifications and aircraft from Ben-My-Chree attacked Turkish troops in the field, disrupting their efforts to defeat the advancing rebels on the landward approaches.

Lees verder op https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/ottoman-empire/arab-revolt of begin hier voor het gehele verhaal: https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/ottoman-empire
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 10:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A.A. Laporte Payne letter to Muriel - 5 June 1917

B.E.F.

June 5th 1917

Darlingest,

Your two letters dated 23rd & 27th May came yesterday and the one dated May 30th arrived to-day, so I am well off indeed, and, darling, I was so awfully glad to get them. They cheered me up immensely and I wanted cheering up too. I was awfully glad to get your news and to know that you are well and liking your work. Your letters were lovely long ones too so I have had a regular feast of good things in the correspondence line. You must be strong to do all the work you do, but I bet you are tired after a day’s work. It is a lovely feeling being thoroughly physically tired and having nothing to do. you will become a most efficient farmer but don’t grow like the little old woman in the photo. Thank you very much for the photos. It is a very good one of you. You look very brown.

I have had no time lately to appreciate the weather or the country as we have been so busy and the Boche has amused himself a good part of the day and all night with shelling us with all kinds of shells. The result being that we have had no sleep for two nights – so you can imagine how we feel. We take refuge in a dark and stuffy dug-out and look like ghouls with our masks on, and certainly feel like nothing on earth.

Your letter arrived to-day in such circumstances. My servant handed me your letter and I heard a large one coming. I stuffed it into my pocket and got into the dug-out with 4 officers. We decided to separate so the adjutant and I bolted for a trench nearby and took with us a telephone and wire to keep in communication. There in a deserted trench sitting in mud being shelled I read your letter so you can imagine how I appreciated receiving it just there. However we got safely out although the wire was cut in 2 or 3 places.

Now after a dinner of sorts we are waiting for the usual night firing to begin – and so the war goes on. Heaven knows where I am going to sleep tonight. I can’t turn the signallers out of the dug-out and my shanty made of tin & a few sand-bags is certainly not safe- but I am certain I shall dream of you whatever happens.

I was very interested to hear all about your domestic arrangements, I should love to see you and Maude pigging it.

The pencil is because we are down in the cellar again – oh these Boche – I suppose they say the same of us only worse. It is ‘some life this!’

How do you like working by time? Horrid isn’t it – and doesn’t Sunday become important as your only free day. We ought to stop the war on Sundays and have a rest – especially from this sort of thing. There is very little news I can tell you at present. It is very warm to-day just right for a comfortable punt on the river somewhere and you.

I can’t write any more now. A wretched runner has just come in panting for breath, and scared out of his wits, with some urgent papers. It is rather terrifying at night in the dark with all our guns all round firing and the Boche doing the same thing you can’t hear the beastly things until they burst.

Much love darling

Hope you are still well & enjoying your work

Many kisses and thoughts.

Ever yours

Archie.

https://the-bay-museum.co.uk/2017/06/05/a-a-laporte-payne-letter-to-muriel-5-june-1917/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 11:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

FIELD MARSHAL LORD KITCHENER AT SCAPA FLOW, 5 JUNE 1916

Lord Kitchener boards HMS IRON DUKE from HMS OAK at 12.25pm prior to lunching with Admiral Lord Jellicoe at Scapa Flow on 5 June 1916.

Foto... https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205040714
Zie ook hier: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kitchener_boarding_HMS_Iron_Duke_5_June_1916_IWM_HU_66128.jpg

On This Day – Drivetime – 5 June 1916 – The death of Lord Kitchener

A number of highly significant Irishmen died violently in 1916 – Patrick Pearse, Tom Clarke, James Connolly and their associates to name but a few who were shot in May. Pacifist Francis Sheehy Skeffington had been summarily executed during the Rising. His brother in law Tom Kettle, barrister, poet and former MP followed them all in September when he died at the Battle of Ginchy on the Western front.

In between, another famous Irishman came to an unfortunate end. However not many people realise that Herbert, Lord Kitchener, hero of Omdurman, scourge of the Boers and Secretary of State for War in the British Cabinet was actually Irish. It was not something he tended to highlight himself.

But he was, in fact, as much a Kerryman as Mick O’Dwyer or John B.Keane. He was born Horatio Herbert Kitchener on 24 June 1850 in Ballylongford, near Listowel. His father, Lt.Col. Henry Horatio Kitchener, had purchased land under the terms of the Encumbered Estates Act designed to buy out bankrupt property owners after the Famine – so a sort of 19th century NAMA.

Kitchener left Kerry at the age of fourteen when the family moved to Switzerland for the health of his ailing mother. The future war lord nurtured a similar attitude to his native land as had that other great 19th century military figure, the Duke of Wellington, who allegedly observed of his Irish birth that, ‘being born in a stable does not make one a horse’. His dislike of the Irish, of course, did not stop Kitchener, like a lot of other Anglo-Irish grandees with a minimal knowledge of the country of their birth, from claiming to have an informed insight into how the country should be governed. Kitchener was for lots of stick and very little carrot.

Not that his counsel on the subject would have been widely canvassed. Kitchener made his reputation in faraway wars, starting with the Sudan and his victory at the Battle of Omdurman in 1898. There he showed his compassionate side by digging up the remains of the Mahdi, slayer of General Gordon in the 1880s humiliation of Khartoum, and having his bones scattered. Even Winston Churchill, not renowned for his squeamishness, who was covering the war as a reporter, was disgusted with the slaughter of, in particular, Sudanese prisoners.

The de facto Kerryman also made his presence felt in the Boer War where his scorched earth policy and his creation of concentration camps brought the Boers to their knees in the most ruthless possible fashion. Kitchener didn’t have much time for uppity colonials.

When WW1 broke out Kitchener was quickly appointed Secretary of State for War and his iconic moustache and index finger were used as recruiting devices on the famous ‘Your country needs you’ posters.’

In a final gesture of solidarity with his native land Kitchener refused all requests for the incorporation of the southern Irish Volunteers as a unit into his New Army, despite the passage of the Home Rule act before hostilities commenced. The Ulster Volunteers however, signatories of a covenant pledging opposition to a democratic decision taken by the British parliament, became the 36th Ulster division. Consistency to Kitchener was as dangerous a vice as sentimentality.

Kitchener, who harboured a pathological hatred of journalists probably owed his appointment to the Cabinet in 1914 to a newspaper campaign designed to force the Liberal government to put this crusty old Tory in charge of the Army and Navy. Having created him the newspapers of the Press Baron Lord Northcliffe, the Dublin born Alfred Harmsworth from Chapelizod, sought to undo their own handiwork when they campaigned against him in 1915, blaming the Secretary of State for War for a chronic shortage of shells on the western front. The public sided with the most famous moustache in history and burned copies of the Times and Mail in the streets.

In June 1916 Kitchener set sail for talks in Russia on board the HMS Hampshire. The ship hit a German mine and sank, taking the Secretary of State for War with it. The reluctant Kerryman died 99 years ago, on this day.

https://mylesdungan.com/2015/06/05/on-this-day-drivetime-5-june-1916-the-death-of-lord-kitchener/

Wiliam Edward Billins (28 April 1891 - 5 June 1916)

William was the son of Arthur Edward Billins and Rose Annie Billins (nee Ray) who married on 29 March 1887 in Heston. Arthur was born in Fulham, London and his wife Rose was born in Hounslow.
Arthur and Rose had 2 children so William had just one younger sister called Elsie Rose who was born in October 1893. His father Arthur was a carpenter by trade. In 1901 the family were living at 30 Chapel Road, Hounslow. At that time William was aged 10 and Elsie was 7. William attended Isleworth Town School. However in January 1902 William’s mother Rose died at the age of 35 when William was aged 11 and Elsie just 8. William’s father Arthur re-married in April 1903 to Emma Marian Sansom.
William enlisted in the army on 18 December 1909 in London and at that
time gave his occupation as a “caddie”. By the time of the 1911 Census
William’s father Arthur and his stepmother Emma were living at 22 Thornbury Road, Isleworth. William himself was at Browndown military camp at Lee on Solent, near Gosport in Hampshire. On 31 October 1914 William married Agnes Rhoda North in Richmond. Previously Agnes had been in domestic service to the Cheshire family in Cresswell Road, Twickenham. By the end of 1915 William and Agnes had a daughter, Rhoda Annie Billins.
In the autumn of 1914 William was promoted to the rank of Corporal in the RMLI. He served on the flagship Drake in Australian waters and in June 1915
he joined the crew of HMS Hampshire. He took part in the Battle of Jutland (31 May -1 June 1916). Shortly afterwards on 5 June, HMS Hampshire was given the task of transporting Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War and his staff on a diplomatic mission from Scapa Flow to Russia. In poor weather conditions and gale force winds, HMS Hampshire struck a mine off
the Orkney coast and sank within 15 minutes. Of more than 700 on board, there were only 12 survivors. William was among those lost, along with Lord Kitchener. He was aged 25. William’s body was not recovered. He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial and on a memorial wall on the island of Orkney. (...)

http://www.isleworthww1.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Billins-William-Edward.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 05 Jun 2018 11:22, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 11:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

5th June 1916 - Worcestershire

No Conscientious Objectors Wanted – At a meeting of the Worcestershire County Council, today, Mr Willis Bond, presiding, read a communication fro, the County Councils’ Association concerning the employment of “conscientious objectors” on work of national importance. The Committee appointed by the Government to draw up a list of occupations of national importance asked if County Councils could employ any, and if so, how many. Among the occupations which they suggested these men might be engaged in was “sanitary work”. The Chairman said he did not want to say anything against conscientious objectors, but he did not think that because a man was an objector he ought to have a preference and to get such work as he pleased to the exclusion of other people, and he should object to engage such men if they were going to propagate their conscientious objection among other employees of a public body.

Worcester Boy on Leave – Tale of Ramming Ships – A Worcester “first class boy” who was on the leading light cruiser, which took part in the great naval battle, in an interview this morning said “We were scouring the seas with three other cruisers and ran into the enemy in a thick fog. They immediately opened fire and so did we. We tried to keep them until the main fleet could come up. The first ship which was struck was the A-. She was not sunk, but badly damaged. The Invincible was sunk by a shell striking the magazine. The cruiser on which I was and another light cruiser rammed a German light cruiser, and we saw her go under in flames.

http://www.ww1worcestershire.co.uk/key-dates/1916/06/british-secretary-of-state-for-war-field-marshal-lord-kitchener-drowned-en-route-to-russia-when-hms-hampshire-strikes-a-mine-off-the-orkney-islands-and-sinks/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 11:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

30 May – 5 June 1916: Sir Walter St John’s School Magazine

The June edition of the Sir Walter St John’s School Magazine brought several updates about Old Boys who were serving with the Armed Forces, and also some obituaries. Updates included congratulations to Harold Eastman for his promotion to 1st Lieutenant with the 2nd Canadian Contingent – although he was wounded in three places a fortnight after his promotion. The Roll of Honour had three names on it, those of James Higgins, Reginald Spring and Frederick Keene, along with some additional information about Harvey Haysom, whose death was reported in the previous magazine.

James Higgins had left school in 1910 and gone to work for the Gas Light and Coke Company, joining the 12th London Regiment before the war in April 1914. He was wounded at Zonnibeke in May 1915 and during his convalescence visited the school in July that year, but died of blood poisoning in October 1915 in Calais. Reginald Spring was baldy wounded by a piece of shell in France in May 1916, dying the next day and the magazine says he was buried in the British Cemetery at Noyelles.

The lengthiest entry in the roll of honour was for Frederick Keene. He had not actually been with the Armed Forces, although the school felt that he merited inclusion as he had been leader of a troop of Boy Scouts who had volunteered for coastal patrol duty. Throughout the winter of 1914-15, Keene had camped with them and cycled to and from his daily work through all weathers, which led to his health failing and the illness of which he later died. His name was included as having given his life for King and Country “as truly as those who have fallen in the trenches or perished at sea!”.

The magazine also features the usual extracts from Old Boys letters, including one from A L Finding, stationed in Egypt “just by the Pyramids”, and referencing being at Gallipoli, another old boy, O D Anderson had also been in Egypt, although was writing having gone from there to Salonika. S T Rogers described having been in a sap which was only 25 yards from the Germans, and occasionally talking to them, including the Germans throwing over a letter from a French prisoner to send to his wife, and two German officers who wanted to know if “any of us had come from Cardiff, as they had been in business there for ten years”. Others seemed more focused on the weather in France, and the negotiations required for billets and food!

Wandsworth 1914-1918 - Commemorating the First World War as it happened in the borough of Wandsworth, https://ww1wandsworth.wordpress.com/2016/05/30/30-may-5-june-1916-sir-walter-st-johns-school-magazine/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 11:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

King Christian X signs the revised constitution of 1915

This picture features the Danish King Christian X signing the revised Constitution of 5 June 1915, in the presence of the government of Prime Minister Carl Theodor Zahle. They are at the king’s residence, the castle of Amalienborg Slot in Copenhagen.

The Constitution of 1915 was an important step for Denmark towards a far more democratic society. One of its most important provisions was the introduction of a woman’s right to vote. Another was that servants without their own household could also vote.

In addition, election for the Landstinget, the first chamber of the Danish parliament until its abolition in 1953, was made more democratic. The privileged right to vote, for instance, was abolished and replaced by a new system. 75% of the members were elected by voters over 35 years of age (over 25 for elections to the Folketinget, the second chamber of the Danish parliament until 1953) and the remaining 25% were elected by the retiring Landstinget.

As early as 1920 the Constitution was revised once again, as a result of the incorporation of Sønderjylland after the reunification.

Foto dus... https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/christian-x-signs-constitution
Zie ook hier (denk ik): http://danmarkshistorien.dk/leksikon-og-kilder/vis/materiale/danmarks-riges-grundlov-af-5-juni-1915/
Zie ook hier: http://www.yourdanishlife.dk/the-100-year-fight/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 11:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sarajevo, June 28, 1914 - The Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand
by Micheal Shackelford

"The Serbian Minister to Vienna, Jovan Jovanovic, was given the task of warning the Austrians. Because of his extremist, pan-Serb views, Jovanovich was not well received in Austrian Foreign Ministry offices. He did, however, get along better with the Minister of Finance, Dr. Leon von Bilinski.
On June 5 [1914], Jovanovic told Bilinski, that it might be good and reasonable if Franz Ferdinand were to not go to Sarajevo. "Some young Serb might put a live rather than a blank cartridge in his gun and fire it." Bilinski, unaccustomed to subtle diplomatic innuendo, completely missed the warning. "Let us hope nothing does happen" he responded good humoredly. Jovanovic strongly suspected that Bilinski did not understand, but made no further effort to convey the warning."

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7/wwi/comment/sarajevo.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15332
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Jun 2018 11:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Grand opening of the first Dada exhibition, Berlin, 5 June 1920

The central figure hanging from the ceiling was an effigy of a German officer with a pigs head. From left to right: Raoul Hausmann, Hannah Höch (sitting), Otto Burchard, Johannes Baader, Wieland Herzfelde, Margarete Herzfelde, dr. Oz (Otto Schmalhausen), George Grosz and John Heartfield.

Foto... en nog een vreemde ook... https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Grand_opening_of_the_first_Dada_exhibition,_Berlin,_5_June_1920.jpg
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Ga naar Pagina Vorige  1, 2
Pagina 2 van 2

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group