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22 April
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zeebrugge 1918: Prelude to St Nazaire

By 1918, the Great War had entered a decisive phase. While Russia had been knocked out of the war, its place had been taken by the United States, which now provided a fresh pool of manpower and industrial capacity to the Allied cause. The transfer of these resources however was threatened by the continuing war at sea and the U-Boat menace that also threatened Britain's link with the continent. The early advance by the German Army in 1914 had meant that the Belgian ports of Ostend and Zeebrugge had been overrun and with the expansion of the port facilities, the Germans were in a position to threaten the very lifeline that supplied the Allied armies in France. The two ports were connected by a canal network with the city of Brugges that also gave access to the open sea. Brugges in turn, was connected to Germany by the railway network and partially completed U-Boats were shipped from Germany, to be finished at Brugges and then make their way to the open sea by means of the canal system. The canals formed a triangle and inside this, the Germans had built a series of airfields from which they conducted air raids on Britain and fortified the entire length of the coast with light and heavy artillery batteries. The Royal Navy did not attempt to bombard these ports until 12 May 1917 when it bombarded Zeebrugge in order to put the lock system out of action and used a smoke screen to hinder German observation. While the bombard failed in its task, the Germans stepped up defensive measures and as the war progressed, the front line drew ever closer to Ostend, bringing it within range of the Royal Marine heavy howitzer battery in France, forcing the Germans to transfer many of its facilities to Zeebrugge.

One of the objectives for the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) was the expulsion of the Germans from Flanders and to capture the ports of Zeebrugge and Ostend. The battle however failed to achieve the intended breakthrough and so any attempt to expel the Germans from these ports or to deny them the use of these facilities meant that any future attempt would have to made from the sea. The mounting losses in the war at sea caused the Royal Navy to look at the problem. A suggestion by Admiral Keyes that the ports might be blocked by sinking a ship in the entrance was initially rejected but as the war dragged on, the Royal Navy returned to the idea and it was decided that it might be done with the use of several ships, although the exact position would have to be chosen with care so that it would not be possible to get around the ships or to dredge around them to create additional channels and their bottoms would have to be blown to sink them as quickly as possible and prevent drifting.

As the ships were approaching the entrance to the port, some protection would be afforded (in the case of Zeebrugge) by the Mole, which extended in an arc across the entrance to the channel. It was over a mile in length and some 100 yards wide, having extensive storage facilities and hangers for seaplanes. A railway connected the Mole to the shore and was used to transfer men, equipment and stores. As the planning for the operation got underway, a special Royal Marine battalion (mainly volunteer) was formed in February 1918 to eliminate the battery that was situated at the end of the Mole and would threaten the block ships as they approached the canal. Lt Col F E Chichester was appointed to command the battalion but was succeeded by Major B N Elliott. The battalion consisted of a headquarters, a machinegun section, a mortar section, three rifle companies and medical support staff. The troops were to be conveyed to Zeebrugge in HMS Vindictive, assisted by the Iris and the Daffodil, two Mersey ferry boats that had been provided for this operation. Once they had reached Zeebrugge, Daffodil was to push Vindictive against the Mole until she could be secured and disembark the troops. The ships were modified for this task. Special ramps were fitted to Vindictive so that the storming parties could reach the Mole, while Iris and Daffodil had been fitted with ladders to that their parties could climb up onto the Mole. Vindictive was strengthened and armoured against the storm of fire she would receive and additional armament fitted so she could support the troops as the moved onto the Mole.

By April 1918, the preparations for the raid had been completed, the men trained for their tasks and the shipping collected for the operation. Three block ships were to be sunk in the Zeebrugge canal entrance, HMS Thetis, HMS Intrepid and HMS Iphegenia. The first time the force sailed, 11 April 1918, the weather conditions changed as they neared Zeebrugge, which forced a postponement, but on the eve of St George's Day, 22 April 1918 the force sailed and during the passage, Admiral Keyes signalled "St George for England". Commander Carpenter on the Vindictive replied, "May we give the dragon's tail a damned good twist." By 23.20 on 22 April, the monitors had opened fire on Zeebrugge. Twenty minutes later, the motor launches that had accompanied the force began to make the smoke screen. One minute after midnight, St George's Day, Vindictive arrived alongside the Mole after which Daffodil arrived alongside her to push her against the Mole. By this point the smoke screen had begun to lift and the defensive fire was intense. In the approach to the Mole, many of the ramps fitted to Vindictive were damaged and only two could be used to allow the storming parties to disembark on the Mole. The ladders fitted to Iris were damaged as well and so the troops had to transfer to Vindictive to land. Once on top of the Mole, they had to endure intense German machinegun fire in order to get to the battery and while they failed to knock it out, they prevented it from firing on the blocking ships and so succeeded in their mission, something for which they suffered heavy casualties for.

The distraction caused by the motor launches and Royal Marines enabled the block ships to approach the canal entrance without too much difficulty. Thetis ran into problems when one of its propellers got caught in a net, forcing her to collide with the bank. She had to be sunk some distance from the entrance but performed admirable work in helping to direct the remaining two ships into the canal entrance itself. Both Intrepid and Iphigenia were able to be sunk in the correct positions, thus blocking the canal. Two submarines, C1 and C3 were packed with explosives and rammed into the viaduct, demolishing it, thus isolating the Mole from the shore. The crews from the submarines and the block ships were picked up by the motor launches despite heavy fire from the German batteries. By 00.50 on 23 April the recall had sounded and by 01.00 the survivors were all aboard. A quarter of an hour later, Vindictive had cleared the protection of the Mole and was undergoing intensive fire from the Germans but managed to come through it. The raid on Ostend at the same time proved to be a failure but another attempt was tried the next month and Vindictive was used as a block ship in that operation. The Royal Marines had been on the Mole for just an hour and the force had displayed such courage and devotion to duty that it gave great encouragement to the Allied forces at such a dark hour in the war. The 4th Royal Marine Battalion was awarded two Victoria Crosses with another six being awarded for the action at Zeebrugge and three being awarded for the actions at Ostend. At Deal, on 26 April 1918, a ballot was held as to who should receive the awards, with Captain Bamford and Sergeant Finch winning. In order that the gallantry of the battalion would be remembered, it was decided that no other marine battalion should be named the 4th.

Antill, P. (9 February 2007), Zeebrugge 1918: Prelude to St Nazaire, http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_zeebrugge.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Death and funeral of the Red Baron

Richthofen was buried in the cemetery at the village of Bertangles, near Amiens, on 22 April 1918. Six airmen with the rank of Captain — the same rank as Richthofen — served as pallbearers, and a guard of honour from the squadron's other ranks fired a salute. Allied squadrons stationed nearby presented memorial wreaths.

Filmpje... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqZcTZH5Ozk
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

British Admiralty Statement on the Zeebrugge Raid, 22-23 April 1918

Reproduced below is the text of the official British Admiralty report on the Royal Navy raid upon the German-held ports of Zeebrugge and Ostend - both used as a base for submarines and light shipping - on the night of 22-23 April 1918.

The raid was originally proposed by British First Sea Lord, Sir John Jellicoe, and formulated by Dover port commander Sir Roger Keyes, after Jellicoe stated to the British cabinet his view that Britain's continuing ability to wage war depended upon blocking the exits from both ports, and thus denying German submarines convenient bases.

The main force of the attack was to be at Zeebrugge, with a smaller raid launched against Ostend. In the event the outcome of the raid upon Zeebrugge was inconclusive - while British losses were heavy an old submarine did destroy the mole connecting the bridge to the shore after it exploded containing explosives. The raid upon Ostend was however a clear failure.

Represented at the time as a tremendous British victory by Allied propaganda (with the consequence that Keyes was ennobled), and by the Germans as a demonstration of their success in holding each port, the Zeebrugge raid did not in reality hinder German operations from either port for more than a few days.

British Admiralty Statement on the Zeebrugge and Ostend Raids, 22-23 April 1918

The objectives were the canal of Zeebrugge and the entrance to the harbour of Ostend.

Three cruisers, Intrepid, Iphigenia and Thetis, each duly packed with concrete and with mines attached to her bottom for the purpose of sinking her, Merrimac-fashion, in the neck of the canal, were aimed at Zeebrugge; two others, similarly prepared, were directed at Ostend.

The old cruiser Vindictive, with two ferry-boats, Iris and Daffodil, was to attack the great half-moon Mole which guards the Zeebrugge Canal, land blue-jackets and marines upon it, destroy what stores, guns, and Germans she could find, and generally create a diversion while the block-ships ran in and sank themselves in their appointed place. Vice-Admiral Keyes, in the destroyer Warwick, commanded the operation.

There had been two previous attempts at the attack, capable of being pushed home if weather and other conditions had served. The night of the 22nd offered nearly all the required conditions, and at some fifteen miles off Zeebrugge the ships took up their formation for the attack.

Vindictive, which had been towing Iris and Daffodil, cast them off to follow under their own steam; Intrepid, Iphigenia, and Thetis slowed down to give the first three time to get alongside the Mole; Sirius and Brilliant shifted their course for Ostend; and the great swarm of destroyers and motor craft sowed themselves abroad upon their multifarious particular duties.

The night was overcast and there was a drift of haze; down the coast a great searchlight swung its beams to and fro; there was a small wind and a short sea.

From Vindictive's bridge, as she headed in towards the Mole with her faithful ferry-boats at her heels, there was scarcely a glimmer of light to be seen shorewards. Ahead of her, as she drove through the water, rolled the smoke-screen, her cloak of invisibility, wrapped about her by the small craft.

The northeast wind moved the volume of it shoreward ahead of the slips; beyond it, the distant town and its defenders were unsuspicious; and it was not till Vindictive, with her blue-jackets and marines standing ready for the landing, was close upon the Mole that the wind lulled and came away again from the southwest, sweeping back the smoke-screen and laying her bare to the eyes that looked seaward.

There was a moment immediately afterwards when it seemed to those in the ships as if the dim coast and the hidden harbour exploded into light. A star shell soared aloft, then a score of star shells; the wavering beams of the search-lights swung round and settled to a glare; the wildfire of gun flashes leaped against the sky; strings of luminous green beads shot aloft, hung and sank; and the darkness of the night was supplanted by the nightmare daylight of battle fires.

Guns and machine guns along the Mole and batteries ashore woke to life, and it was in a gale of shelling that Vindictive laid her nose against the thirty-foot high concrete side of the Mole, let go an anchor, and signed to Daffodil to shove her stern in. Iris went ahead and endeavoured to get alongside likewise.

The fire, from the account of everybody concerned, was intense. While ships plunged and rolled beside the Mole in an unexpected send of sea, Vindictive with her greater draught jarring against the foundation of the Mole with every plunge, they were swept diagonally by machine-gun fire from both ends of the Mole and by heavy batteries ashore.

Commander A. F. B. Carpenter (afterward Captain) conned Vindictive from her open bridge till her stern was laid in, when he took up his position in the flame-thrower hut on the port side. It is marvellous that any occupant of the hut should have survived a minute, so riddled and shattered is it.

Officers of Iris, which was in trouble ahead of Vindictive, describe Captain Carpenter as "handling her like a picket-boat."

Vindictive was fitted along the port side with a high false deck, whence ran the eighteen brows, or gangways, by which the storming and demolition parties were to land. The men were gathered in readiness on the main and lower decks. The gangways were lowered, and scraped and rebounded upon the high parapet of the Mole as Vindictive rolled; and the word for the assault had not yet been given when both leaders of the assault were killed by the machine-gun fire which swept the decks.

"The men were magnificent." Every officer bears the same testimony. The mere landing on the Mole was a perilous business; it involved a passage across the crashing, splintering gangways, a drop over the parapet into the field of fire of the German machine guns which swept its length, and a further drop of some sixteen feet to the surface of the Mole itself.

Many were killed and more were wounded as they crowded up to the gangways; but nothing hindered the orderly and speedy landing by every gangway.

The lower deck was a shambles as the Commander made the rounds of his ship; yet those wounded and dying raised themselves to cheer as he made his tour. The crew of the howitzer which was mounted forward had all been killed; a second crew was destroyed likewise; and even then a third crew was taking over the gun.

In the stern cabin a firework expert, who had never been to sea before, was steadily firing great illuminating rockets out of a scuttle to show up the lighthouse on the end of the Mole to the block ships and their escort.

The Daffodil, after aiding to berth Vindictive, should have proceeded to land her own men, but now Commander Carpenter ordered her to remain as she was, with her bows against Vindictive's quarter, pressing the latter ship into the Mole.

Iris had troubles of her own. Her first attempts to make fast to the Mole ahead of Vindictive failed, as her grapnels were not large enough to span the parapet. Two officers climbed ashore and sat astride the parapet trying to make the grapnels fast till each was killed and fell down between the ship and the wall.

Iris was obliged at last to change her position and fall in astern of Vindictive, and suffered very heavily from the fire. A single big shell plunged through the upper deck and burst below at a point where fifty-six marines were waiting the order to go to the gangways. Forty-nine were killed and the remaining seven wounded.

Another shell in the ward-room, which was serving as sick bay, killed four officers and twenty-six men. Her total casualties were eight officers and sixty-nine men killed and three officers and a hundred and two men wounded.

The storming and demolition parties upon the Mole met with no resistance from the Germans, other than the in-tense and unremitting fire. The geography of the great Mole, with its railway line and its many buildings, hangars, and store-sheds, was already well known, and the demolition parties moved to their appointed work in perfect order.

One after another the buildings burst into flame or split and crumpled as the dynamite went off.

A bombing party, working up towards the Mole extension in search of the enemy, destroyed several machine-gun emplacements, but not a single prisoner rewarded them. It appears that upon the approach of the ships, and with the opening of the fire, the enemy simply retired and contented themselves with bringing machine guns to the shore end of the Mole.

And while they worked and destroyed, the covering party below the parapet could see in the harbour, by the light of the German star-shells, the shapes of the block ships stealing in and out of their own smoke and making for the mouth of the canal.

Thetis came first, steaming into a tornado of shell from the great batteries ashore. All her crew, save a remnant who remained to steam her in and sink her, had already been taken off her by the ubiquitous motor launches, but the remnant spared hands enough to keep her four guns going. It was hers to show the road to Intrepid and Iphigenia, who followed.

She cleared the string of armed barges which defends the channel from the tip of the Mole, but had the ill-fortune to foul one of her propellers upon the net defence which flanks it on the shore side. The propeller gathered in the net and rendered her practically unmanageable; the shore batteries found her and pounded her unremittingly; she bumped into a bank, edged off, and found herself in the channel again, still some hundreds of yards from the mouth of the canal, in a practically sinking condition.

As she lay she signalled invaluable directions to the others, and here her commander blew the charges and sank her. A motor launch raced alongside and took off her crew. Her losses were five killed and five wounded.

Intrepid, smoking like a volcano and with all her guns blazing, followed; her motor launch had failed to get along-side outside the harbour, and she had men enough for anything. Straight into the canal she steered, her smoke blowing back from her into Iphigenia's eyes, so that the latter, blinded and going a little wild, rammed a dredger with a barge moored beside it, which lay at the western arm of the canal.

She got clear though, and entered the canal pushing the barge before her. It was then that a shell hit the steam connections of her whistle, and the escape of steam which followed drove off some of the smoke and let her see what she was doing.

The commander of the Intrepid placed the nose of his ship neatly on the mud of the western bank, ordered his crew away, and blew up his ship by the switches in the chart-room.

Four dull bumps was all that could be heard; and immediately afterwards there arrived on deck the engineer, who had been in the engine-room during the explosion and reported that all was as it should be.

The commander of Iphigenia beached her according to arrangement on the eastern side, blew her up, saw her drop nicely across the canal, and left her with her engines still going to hold her in position till she should have bedded well down on the bottom.

According to latest reports from air observation, the two old ships with their holds full of concrete are lying across the canal in a V position; and the work they set out to do has been accomplished. The canal is effectively blocked.

The whole harbour was alive with small craft. As the motor launches cleared the canal, and came forth to the incessant geysers thrown tip by the shells, rescuers and rescued had a view of yet another phase of the attack.

The shore end of the Mole consists of a jetty, and here an old submarine, loaded with explosives, was run into the piles and touched off, her crew getting away in a boat to where the usual launch awaited them.

Officers describe the explosion as the greatest they ever witnessed - a huge roaring spout of flame that tore the jetty in half and left a gap of over 100 feet. The claim of another launch to have sunk a torpedo-boat alongside the jetty is supported by many observers, including officers of the Vindictive, who had seen her mast and funnel across the Mole and noticed them disappear.

Where every moment had its deed and every deed its hero, a recital of acts of valour becomes a mere catalogue.

"The men were magnificent," say the officers; the men's opinion of their leaders expresses itself in the manner in which they followed them, in their cheers, in their demeanour to-day while they tidy up their battered ships, setting aside the inevitable souvenirs, from the bullet-torn engines to great chunks of Zeebrugge Mole dragged down and still hanging in the fenders of the Vindictive.

The motor launch from the canal cleared the end of the Mole and there beheld, trim and ready, the shape of the Warwick, with the great silk flag presented to the Admiral by the officers of his old ship, the Centurion. They stood up on the crowded decks of the little craft and cheered it again and again.

While the Warwick took them on board, they saw Vindictive, towed loose from the Mole by Daffodil, turn and make for home - a great black shape, with funnels gapped and leaning out of the true, flying a vast streamer of flame as her stokers worked her up - her, the almost wreck - to a final display of seventeen knots.

Her forward funnel was a sieve; her decks were a dazzle of sparks; but she brought back intact the horseshoe nailed to it, which had been presented to her commander.

Meantime the destroyers North Star, Phoebe, and Warwick, which guarded the Vindictive from action by enemy destroyers while she lay beside the Mole, had their share in the battle.

North Star, losing her way in the smoke, emerged to the light of the star-shells, and was sunk. The German communiqué, which states that only a few members of the crew could be saved by them, is in this detail of an unusual accuracy, for the Phoebe came up under a heavy fire in time to rescue nearly all.

Throughout the operations monitors and the siege guns in Flanders, manned by the Royal Marine Artillery, heavily bombarded the enemy's batteries.

The wind that blew back the smoke-screen at Zeebrugge served us even worse off Ostend, where that and nothing else prevented the success of an operation ably directed by Commodore Hubert Lynes, C.M.G.

The coastal motor boats had lit the approaches and the ends of the piers with calcium flares and made a smoke-cloud which effectually hid the fact from the enemy

Sirius and Brilliant were already past the Stroom Bank buoy when the wind changed, revealing the arrangements to the enemy, who extinguished the flares with gunfire.

The Sirius was already in a sinking condition when at length the two ships, having failed to find the entrance, grounded, and were forced therefore to sink themselves at a point about four hundred yards east of the piers, and their crews were taken off by motor launches.

Source Records of the Great War, Vol. VI, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/zeebrugge_admiralty1.htm
Zie zeker ook hier: http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGDispatchesNavy1919-20.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Sándor Hollán, Jr.

Sándor József Hollán the Younger (6 October 1873 – 22 April 1919) was a Hungarian politician and state secretary.

Hollán was born in Tabán (part of Budapest) to Sándor Hollán, Sr. and Róza Szalay. His godfather was József Szlávy who served as Prime Minister of Hungary between 1872 and 1874. Hollán married to Mária Kolossváry. He became director of the Hungarian State Railways in 1910 as a ministerial councillor.

During the Hungarian Soviet Republic he was one of the first victims of the Red Terror. He was kidnapped along with his father from their residence on 22 April 1919. On the Széchenyi Chain Bridge the communist perpetrators shot in the head from behind both of them and threw their bodies into the Danube.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1ndor_Holl%C3%A1n,_Jr.
Papa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1ndor_Holl%C3%A1n,_Sr.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

S.H. Love patents improvement to miltary gun, April 22, 1919

S. H. Love, born in 1893 in Colt, Arkansas, served in Europe during WWI where he always claimed later he had passed on to a buddy the idea for a draw theater curtain, as opposed to one which dropped from the ceiling. He did develop an idea to improve military guns, for which he applied and was granted a patent 22 April 1919. patent no. 1,301,143.

http://www.blackfacts.com/fact/6355faba-c370-4a47-a086-13f1b951e479
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

CANADIANS IN SIBERIA 1918-1919
by Ian C.D. Moffat

(...) Canadians commenced the return from Siberia on 22 April 1919, and the last member of the Canadian Expeditionary Force left for home on 5 June 1919. The departure of the Canadians from Siberia precipitated the departure of the rest of British forces, who first decamped to Vladivostok by the end of summer. (...)

Mooi PDF'je... http://www.siberianexpedition.ca/sources/Moffat_Forgotten-Battlefields_2007.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2011 22:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GREAT WAR LIVES LOST - Sunday 22 April 1917 – We Lost 963

A violent explosion occurs on board HM Motor Launch 431 while she is lying alongside the jetty at her base. The aft part of the vessel is wrecked, and it at once becomes known that Sub Lieutenant Charles W Nash RNVR is buried beneath the wreckage. Chief Motor Mechanic Ernest Pooley and Deckhand Herbert Powley, who are on board their own vessel lying at the jetty some fifty yards astern, immediately hurry to the motor launch, which is by this time burning fiercely. The flames are drawing nearer to the spot where Sub-Lieutenant Nash lays buried, and it is clear that there is imminent danger of the afte petrol tanks exploding at any moment. Regardless of the fact that this would mean certain death to them, Powley and Pooley jump on board the vessel and succeed in extricating Sub-Lieutenant Nash from beneath the wreckage and carrying him to the jetty. As they were leaving the boat the whole of the afte part bursts into flames, and, in all probability had they delayed for another thirty seconds all three would have perished. Deckhand Powley, who led the way on board the burning motor launch, had subsequently to be sent to hospital suffering from the effects of fumes. For their efforts both men will be awarded the Albert Medal.

Lees verder op https://greatwarliveslost.com/2017/04/21/sunday-22-april-1917-we-lost-963/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2018 22:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22 April 1917 - Charles King Brothers dies of wounds in France

Charles King Brothers was born into a family with a long history of public service; his father was a dentist of international renown, his maternal grandfather, Charles McArthur King was a Governor of Norfolk Island and his great great grandfather was Phillip Gidley King, the third Governor of New South Wales.

Charles was born in Orange in 1897, the first of two children born to Ernest Linwood Brothers and his wife Mary Christiana nee King. A sister, Mavis, was born in Sydney in 1899. The family moved to Rangeville in southern Queensland where Ernest practiced dentistry and Charles attended Rangeville State School. As a teenager, Charles served for four years with the Citizens Military Forces, attaining the rank of 2nd Lieutenant.

Following his education Charles worked as a draper. In October 1915 he travelled to Toowoomba, where he enlisted. Sapper Brothers embarked from Sydney with the 6th Field Company Engineers, 5th Reinforcements, aboard HMAT Star of Victoria on 31 March 1916, disembarking in Tel-el-Kebir on 5 May. He served in England and France before being taken on strength with the 5th Field Company Engineers in Belgium on 9 September 1916.

In early February 1917 Charles was hospitalised for 12 days suffering from trench foot. He rejoined his unit on 18 February 1917. On 21 April Charles received several gunshot wounds to the left buttock and right foot. He was admitted to No. 3 Casualty Clearing Station, where he died the following day of his wounds. He was buried in the Grevillers British Cemetery by the Reverend EG Muschamp.

Charles King Brothers is commemorated on panel number 123 on the Roll of Honour at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/service-men-and-women/charles-king-brothers/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2018 22:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Map of German troop disposition around Saint-Quentin on 22 April 1917

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_German_troop_disposition_around_Saint-Quentin_on_22_April_1917.jpg
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2018 22:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Besuch des Kaiserpaares am 22. April 1917 in Bozen

Foto! https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Besuch_des_Kaiserpaares_am_22._April_1917_in_Bozen._(BildID_15583836).jpg
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Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2018 23:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

22.04.1917: Die Familie Falkenstein im Frühjahr 1917

Jablonna, 22.4.1917

Der Gefreite Falkenstein bittet
um Arbeitsurlaub zur Bestellung
der Frühjahrssaat. Mein 4 Bruder ist
auch vor 14 Tagen bei Garde Pionier eingezogen und
der Vater allein in der Landwirtschaft
und Müllerei.

Er ist auch schon 63 Jahr
alt, und über Tod des einen Bruders
welcher in der Sommeschlacht 20 Spt 1916 den
Heldentodt fand, und des zweiten Bruders
noch (aktiv) auch in der Sommeschlacht ver-
wundet, schwer gealtert. Mein letzter
Urlaub war vor acht Monaten zur Einbringung
der Erndte.
Gefr. Falkenstein 4 Comp III Batl.
Inf. Ersatztruppe Warschau

Eine Schwester ist auch schon lange krank.

http://3p1w.eu/22-04-1917/
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Apr 2018 23:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Lance Corporal WALTER KIMBERLEY - died 22 April 1917

Lance Corporal WALTER KIMBERLEY
Service No: 5465
Age: 32
Regiment/Service: 5th Coldstream Guards
Cemetery: BIRMINGHAM (WITTON) CEMETERY Sec.82. Grave 13233A

Professional football left back and right half who played in the Football League for Aston Villa.

While playing for Coventry City, Kimberley worked at the Coventry Ordnance Works. An army reservist, Kimberley rejoined the Coldstream Guards as a lance corporal in August 1914, during the opening months of the First World War. The following month, he was captured by the Germans during the First Battle of the Marne and spent two years as a prisoner of war, before being repatriated to Britain in August 1916 with pulmonary tuberculosis. Kimberley was immediately discharged from the army and fell into severe ill heath, permanently losing his voice and dying at home in Aston on 22 April 1917.

A uncompromising and energetic full-back, Kimberley was a pre-war regular soldier who played for Aston Villa, Coventry City and Walsall before serving in France.

Kimberley joined Aston Villa from amateur side Aston Manor in 1906 and was handed his debut in a 1-0 win at Arsenal on 8 February 1908. He would subsequently struggle to establish himself at Villa Park, however, and joined Coventry City in 1912 after just six further appearances. During his time at Highfield Road, Kimberley would find playing time easier to come by and by the time he left in 1914, he had played 23 matches in all competitions. A brief spell at Walsall followed before Kimberley’s career was finally ended by the First World War.

Private 5465 Kimberley was a pre-war regular soldier who enlisted in the Coldstream Guards on 5 March 1904. Mobilized at the outbreak of the First World War, Kimberley was posted to 1st Battalion and appointed lance corporal on 6 August 1914. The battalion were amongst the first troops of the British Expeditionary Force to land in France and were involved in heavy fighting during The Battle of Mons, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne and the First Battle of Ypres. Kimberley was subsequently captured by the enemy and sent to a prisoner of war (PoW) camp in Germany.

Kimberley was repatriated in August 1916 as part of a prisoner exchange, however, his health had deteriorated significantly in the two years he had spent in captivity. A subsequent medical report revealed that Kimberley had contracted severe tonsillitis, laryngitis and bronchitis during his time in Germany, a devastating combination that resulted in Kimberley permanently losing his voice. Furthermore, Kimberley was also suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis.

Admitted to Queen Alexandra’s Military Hospital, Millbank, on his return to Britain, Kimberley was discharged from the Army as “No Longer Physically Fit for War Service” on 1 September 1916 and returned to his family home in Birmingham. A subsequent Medical Board report issued on 9 January 1917 recorded Kimberley’s condition as “Total Incapacity”, indicating the severity of his failing health. Three months later, on 22 April 1917, Walter Kimberley died from TB at his home on Clifton Road, Aston and was buried at Birmingham (Witton) Cemetery. He was just 32-years-old and left a widow and two young children.

http://eyewitnesstours.com/lance-corporal-walter-kimberley-died-22-april-1917/
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