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29 Maart

 
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Hauptmann



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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2006 6:19    Onderwerp: 29 Maart Reageer met quote

March 29

1917 Swedish prime minister resigns over WWI policy

Prime Minister Hjalmar Hammarskjold of Sweden, father of the famous future United Nations Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold, resigns on this day in 1917 after his policy of strict neutrality in World War I—including continued trading with Germany, in violation of the Allied blockade—leads to widespread hunger and political instability in Sweden.

The elder Hammarskjold, a professor of law who became active in politics and served as a delegate to the Hague convention on international law in 1907, was asked by King Gustav V of Sweden to become prime minister in 1914 after a popularly elected government was opposed and defeated by conservative forces. From the beginning of his administration, Hammarskjold pursued a policy of strict neutrality in the war, continuing trade with Germany and thus subjecting his country and people to the hardships wrought by the Allied naval blockade in the North Sea, in place from November 1914.

Though the Allies—and many within Sweden—saw Hammarskjold’s neutrality as a pro-German policy, he apparently considered it a necessary product of his firm principles regarding international law. Sweden’s sacrifice during the war, he believed, would prove that it was not an opportunistic nation but a just one; this would put it in a stronger position after the war ended. In practice, however, his policies, and the hunger they produced, hurt Hammarskjold, as did his identification with Sweden’s monarchy and other reactionary forces, just as a movement toward true parliamentary democracy was growing in Sweden.

In 1917, Hammarskjold rejected a proposal for a common trade agreement with Great Britain that had been brokered by Marcus Wallenberg, brother of Sweden’s foreign minister, Knut Wallenberg, and would have brought much-needed economic relief to Sweden. With the obvious conflict between Hammarskjold and Wallenberg, the prime minister lost the support of even his most right-wing allies in parliament, and was forced to submit his resignation at the end of March 1917. He was succeeded by Carl Swartz, a conservative member of parliament who served only seven months. In October 1917, Sweden’s Social Democratic party won their first general election, and Nils Eden became prime minister.

http://www.historychannel.com
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Hauptmann



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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2006 6:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Events
None for 29 March



Births
1 29 Mar 1893 John Manuel
2 29 Mar 1894 Bertram Heinrich
3 29 Mar 1898 Cecil Lewis



Deaths
1 29 Mar 1921 Daniel Galbraith
2 29 Mar 1938 Marcel Bloch



Claims
1 29 Mar 1916 Otto Jindra #4
2 29 Mar 1916 Max Immelmann #12
3 29 Mar 1918 Roland Critchley #5 #6 #7
4 29 Mar 1918 George Hayward #17
5 29 Mar 1918 H. Pullen #1
6 29 Mar 1918 Dieter Collin #6
7 29 Mar 1918 Karl Schattauer #3
8 29 Mar 1918 Ernesto Cabruna #4
9 29 Mar 1918 Josiah Morgan #11 #12



Losses
None for 29 March

http://www.theaerodrome.com/today/
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the beno



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1915
Eastern Front

Germans take Tauroggen (north-east of Tilsit).

Further Russian advance in the Carpathians; 5,600 prisoners.

Political, etc.

Holland protests against the sinking of one ship, the shelling of another, and the detention of two more, by the Germans.

1916
Western Front

Battle of Verdun: Germans enter Malancourt village; French recover Avocourt redoubt.

Eastern Front

Thaw on the Russian front suspends operations.

Southern Front

Italian success east of Seltz.

Political, etc.

General Polivanov resigns at War Minister; succeeded by General Shuvaiev.

Unrest in Holland.

1917
Western Front

British take Neuville-Bourjonval (seven miles east of Bapaume) after sharp fighting.

German retreat slackens.

Southern Front

Heavy Austrian attacks in the Carso repulsed.

Political, etc.

Speech by German Chancellor.

Speech by Mr. Bonar Law; 100,000 men needed.

Military Service (Review of Exemptions) Bill passed.

Hamarskjold (Conservative) Ministry in Sweden resigns.

1918
Western Front

No serious fighting north of Somme. Between Somme and Avre Germans continue to advance, taking Hamel, Mezieres and Demuin.

French hold line west of Mezieres-La Neuville-Sire Bernard-outskirts of Montdidier.

Continued French counter-attacks on southern flank.

Germans claim 70,000 prisoners and 1,100 guns since opening of offensive.

General Foch appointed to co-ordinate action of Allied Armies.

Long-range gun causes 160 casualties in Parish church.

Eastern Front

Germans ratify Brest-Litovsk treaty of 3 March.

Turks ratify peace with Russia and Ukraine.
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 18:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Letters from Tsar Nicholas to Tsaritsa Alexandra - March 1916

Telegram.

Kamenetz-Podolsk. 29 March, 1916.

I have returned from the review near Khotin. The troops presented themselves in excellent condition. Saw our Kouban Cossack Squadron. Wind, rain, hail. Have visited two hospitals. I embrace all closely.

NICKY.

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/letters/march16.html
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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31st Bn - Auckland Mounted Rifles Camp Near Duntroon Plateau, Egypt

By Battalion Adjutant on March 29, 1916

0600: Reveille.

0900: Battalion again received orders to move to vicinity of Auckland Mounted Rifles Camp near Duntroon Plateau. Camel transport (106 camels).

1100: Moved by route march; a long trying day - very warm - all worked willingly.

Afternoon: Arranged camp and settled down. CO attended by RMO reconnoitered positions on the front line.

http://aifhistory.org/1916/03/
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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THE MONTHLY DIARIES OF Lt RALPH. D. DOUGHTY. M.C.

Ralph Dorchel Doughty was born on 1st October 1891, the eighth and youngest child of William and Susanna Doughty of Stratford, New Zealand. He went to Australia in 1913 (to work) and at the beginning of World War I joined the 1st Australian Artillery Division and fought at Gallipoli and then in France. He was mentioned in dispatches, and awarded the Military Cross and was made a Lieutenant. He died of wounds on 25th July 1917 (aged 25). He was interred in Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium. Ralph Doughty was in active service for a total of nearly 2 years before he became a WWI casualty.

29th March 1916
(Chateau D'if) My first glimpse of France at 7am. My first impression of same is that it's uncommonly like NZ particularly the South Island. All morning has been spent scanning the coast in hopes of picking up Marseilles, and just now 10.30am we got our first glimpse of that city. Tied up the wharf at 12am. Coming up the harbour (which is magnificent in the extreme), we passed the Tower from which the Count of Monte Cristo was thrown somewhere about the year 'umpteen'. Also passed a beautiful church perched away up on a hill. On the largest steeple of the church is a fine gilded statue which dazzles your eyes even though you're a few miles away.. Disembarked at 4pm. Had dinner on the 'Nessian' and then walked to camp about 2 miles from the wharf. An absolute brute of a camp too. 2/5 under water. Chas, Faulkner and self managed to get up town for a few hours at night. Great beano and no questions.

http://www.thekivellfamily.co.nz/family_pages/ralphs_diaries/monthly/04_march_16.html
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Battalion war diary March 1916 - 1/6th Battalion South Staffordshire war diaries

29th March, Wednesday
Enemy shelled our trenches heavily from 2 p.m. to 2-20 p.m. using Howitzers and H.E., concentrating upon 063, 064, OS03, OS64 with H.E. and the ground between these trenches with Howitzers.
Our Artillery barrage operated very quickly.
At 6-50 p.m. last night we sprang a mine which formed a crater on left of B4. The whole was occupied and partly consolidated.
Our Artillery support followed prompt upon the explosion, and was excellent in effect.
The enemy severely bombarded PAYERNE TRENCH and 063, 064, OS63, OS64 with H.E. His Howitzers damaged BOYOU DES ONDES and DENIS LAROQUE.
Intermittent artillery fire continued till 8 p.m. and from that time the situation was quiet, and the work of repairing and consolidating was pressed on.

http://blackcountry-territorials.org/articles/battalion-war-diary-march-1916
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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8th King's Royal Rifle Corps: War Diary: March 1916

29th March Wednesday - Our snipers continue their operations in BLANGY by permission of the 7th KRRC. A German sniper, who has claimed several victims in the last day or two from the 7th Battn, was shot through his loophole after hours of patient watching by one of our men.

http://www.resthepast.co.uk/army/wardiaries/krrc/8btn/8krrc_mar16.html
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI. Vol. 150, March 29, 1916.

A telegram from Rome states that it is generally believed that Admiral Tirpitz resigned because he could not take the German Fleet out. Others again maintain that it was because he could no longer take the German people in.

"It is not unusual for horses to go to sleep as they walk along," said a sagacious coroner last week. How often in the old four-wheeler days, when we were going ventre a terre from Buckingham Palace to the National Liberal Club, conversation was rendered impossible by the snores of the flying steed.
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 19:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HONGKONG LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, 29TH MARCH, 1917.

The Colony and War Finance

HIS EXCELLENCY, before proceeding with the
orders of the day, said:―Towards the end of my
address on the estimates last October I gave a short
summary of what had been done by the Colony in the
way of contributions for war purposes, and I propose
now to give the figures up to the 15th March. The
largest contributions in the Colony are the gift of
$3,000,000 raised by local loan and the gift of
$2,000,000 paid out of the revenues of the Colony.
You have no doubt learned through the medium of
the Press of the proposed gift by the Chinese
Community of $1,000,000 to the Imperial war chest
for the current year and for each succeeding year of
the war. I have not had official confirmation yet of this
very generous offer, so I shall not allude to it now
further than to say that this Government and I myself
appreciate exceedingly this splendid offer. (Applause.)
The contributions, both direct and indirect, to loans
issued by the Imperial Government have been very
large. A sum of £1,145,000 has been taken up by the
Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation and
large sums have been taken up by local Companies
from funds available in London. In addition the
amounts taken up through the British Banks in the
Colony are as follows:―

Lees verder op http://www.legco.gov.hk/1917/h170329.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 29 Mrt 2018 7:41, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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German attack at St Quentin, March 1918

29th March 1918
1st Dublins were then incorporated into a group known as the "Aubigny Details", and marched out at 5am to occupy a position Bois de Vaire at Le Hamel, in support of the line at Bois des Tailloux. Heavy enemy shelling was reported.

49th Brigade War Diary records. Drafts for 16th Div., men returning from leave & stragglers being collected & re-equipped at Aubigny under Lt.-Col Moore, 1st Dublin Fusiliers. 130 men refused to carry wire up to the line, the diary does not say who they were. The fate of the 130 men who, on 29th March, refused to carry wire up to the line is not known, apart from their being marched off by the A.P.M.

http://www.dublin-fusiliers.com/battaliions/1-batt/campaigns/1918-kaisers.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 19:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

No 32 Squadron RFC/RAF 1918

A brief history

No 32 squadron RFC formed in January 1916 from a nucleus of 21 Sqn and was equipped with single seat DH2's. The first CO Maj. L W B Rees VC MC joined the squadron on 1 Feb 1916. Rees was replaced by Maj. T A E Cairnes DSO on 7 Jul 1916 following Rees' wounding in action (for which he received the VC). 32 Sqn later re-equipped in May 1917 with DH5's and these were then replaced from late December 1917 by SE5a's, the change being completed by 8 March 1918.

Major John Russell, took command of the squadron on 11 September 1917, a popular CO, he remained in command for the rest of the war. In March 1918 as the squadron completed its re-equipment with SE5a's it was based at Bailleul. The Squadron joined 9th Wing RFC on 26 March 1918 from 11th Wing RFC, becoming part of IX Brigade RAF on 1 April.

32 Sqn moved to Belleville Farm (SE of Hesdin) on 27 March and then to Beauvois on 29 March withdrawing in front of the German advance on the Somme. Lt. Proctor achieved the first victory for an SE5a with the squadron on 29 March destroying an Albatross DV south of Proyart, however two aircraft were damaged in action the same day, one by AA, the other in combat (2nd Lt. Tyrrell).

On the first day of the RAF, 1 April, Lt. Viscount Glentworth observed four enemy scouts attacking two SE5s and dived on them destroying 1 EA N of Beaucourt. The same day Lt. Proctor drove down an Albatros DV out of control but was himself wounded. Capt. Faure was shot up and forced to land. The first few days of April were taken up with attacking troops and transport with 25lb bombs and machine guns in the area around Moreuil SE of Amiens (the only single seat Sqn of 9th Wing carrying bombs in the first three days). On 7 April 2nd Lt. Tyrrell on a morning patrol destroyed a Fokker Dr1, an Albatros DV and claimed a further Albatros OOC, the last two NE of La Motte. Attacks on troops in trenches continued with 28 25lb bombs being dropped and 4950 rounds being fired.

On April 10th, the Germans broke through on the Armentieres front. Offensive patrols by 32 Sqn switched from the Somme sector to the Lys. IX Brigade Squadrons were assigned missions to meet the German push toward Merville on the Lys. 32 Sqn along with other fighter units of IX Brigade provided high level cover for the I Brigade attacking targets between La Bassee and the Lys. IX Brigade pilots averaged 6-7 hours flying each in the 24 hours from 4pm on the 11 April. Poor weather had limited action by the RAF on the Lys before the 12 April. The German advance was eventually held and the battle of the Lys came to an end with actions on 29 April.

Note: EA = enemy aircraft

http://www.32.airwar1.org.uk/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 19:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT OFFICERS DIED 1918

Lieutenant CLAUDE FRANK LETHBRIDGE TEMPLER - Killed in action 4th June 1918 - 1st Battalion
Born 5th July 1895, in India. Educated Wellington College. Commissioned August 1914. He was captured at La Bassee 22nd December 1914 and sent to Strohen camp in Germany. After 11 unsuccessful attempts he finally escaped to Holland in June 1917. On the evening of 4th June 1918 he led a raid near Auchy-les-Mines, whilst returning back across No-Man's Land he was struck by a shell and killed. He is listed on the Loos Memorial to the Missing. Aged 22 years. He was a war poet.
Memorial in RMC Sandhurst Chapel - "To the glory of God and in proud memory of Claude Templer, Captain, 1st Bn The Gloucestershire Regiment. Wounded and captured 22nd December 1914. Escaped from captivity in Strohen, 29th September 1917, after having made 12 previous attempts from the prison camps at Hanover, Munden, Torgau, Burg (twice), Magdeburg, Augustabad, from the Burg Civil Goal (4 times), the Fortress of Wesel, twice whilst travelling under escort between Wesel and Magdeburg. Rejoined his regiment at his own special request 29th March 1918. Killed by a chance shell whilst returning from a successful raid on the German trenches in the La Bassee Sector, 4th June 1918, in his 23rd year."

http://glosters.tripod.com/1918off.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 19:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World War 1: American Soldier's Letters Home

This blog is derived from letters home from Paul Hills during the first World War. They begin in April 1917, just after the United States declared war, when he joined a volunteer ambulance unit attached to the French army.

Letter written March 29, 1918

Dear Papa-:

I was tremendously sorry to hear that you had been sick and hope by the time that you get this you will be well enough to feel as tho you had never had anything the matter with you.

As for me I am doing exactly the same thing now as I started in on about the first of February. As you can well imagine I am just about fed up with observation and looking forward to nothing as much as a change. No matter what variety. My work I suppose is as interesting as any other and I hope is doing as much for the country. However eight hours of work and then eight hours of rest day after day for two months with most days pretty much alike is bound to get a bit tiresome. What some writer said about modern war was the truest and about the most correct definition I have ever heard. He said that modern war was damn dirty, damn dull and damn dangerous. There are changes, however, and it is those that keep things from getting overpowering. This afternoon for example at the beginning it was clear. We saw a crowd of Bosche come out of the woods about nine kilometers off with a wagon and start to unload a lot of material. We located them, reported them in and a battery started in on them. The first shots weren’t very close and gave them time to get away. You should have seen those Dutchmen scatter. I don’t believe we hit any but at least we discouraged their architectural efforts for the day. That is just one of the things we do, although our main task is spotting and helping put our guns on German batteries that are shooting at us. There is really a great deal of satisfaction in catching a battery in action, directing the old heavies until they land right on it and then see it suddenly cease firing. You really feel as tho you had done something. It is a great deal as tho the guns were at Garnston (the Hills summer cottage on the west shore of Owasco Lake near Auburn –Ed.) behind the hill and I was on top of the hill with a telephone to you, telling you how your shots were landing on Scipio Center or Woods Pond (small communities several miles distant –Ed.) Quite a bit cold blooded and distant but when things get all tuned up and working perfectly and you can move your shots around just as tho you were there yourself it doesn’t seem that way at all. Then there are other times too when Fritzy gets angry at something and heaves over something like a garbage can full of Melinite. It comes at you like a train of cars, blows up like a thunderstorm and completely changes the topography of about a half acre of ground. You sit still and hope and wonder where the next one is going to land. Those times aren’t nearly as nice or interesting but it’s all in the day’s work.

It is great of you to keep sending me the newspaper clippings and they really make me feel as tho I was not quite as far away as I really am. This is all now, good bye, hoping you are better. With love, Paul

http://wwar1letters.blogspot.com/2008/11/letter-written-march-29-1918.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 20:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Star - Christchurch - March 1919

Saturday 29 March 1919

Wedding - MORRICE - BERRIDGE
Mr J.F.Morrice, a returned soldier, was married to Miss E.Berridge, at the bride's home on Thursday morning ---- will reside in the Amuri district.

Wedding - LARGE - SMITH
Mr Alfred Large, a returned Anzac only son of the late Mr and Mrs A.Large of Christchurch to Miss J. Maria Winifred Smith, only dau of Mr and Mrs C.Smith, of Linwood ----- bride given away by her uncle Mr George McCaw, of Beckenham ----- Miss May Redmond a cousin of the bride was a bridesmaid ---- Miss Kathleen Bampton was flower girl ---- Mr Frank Burnett, also a returned Anzac was best man. -------

http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~ashleigh/1870-1908/1919.March.Star.Christchurch.snippets.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 20:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A Land Fit for Heroes?
A History of Soldier Settlement in New South Wales, 1916-1939


HODDINOTT, Frank William
NAME: Frank William HODDINOTT
BORN: Abt. 1895
DIED: Poss. 1978
MILITARY SERIAL NO.: 86
UNIT: 1st Mobile Vet. Section
ENLISTED: Sydney 13 November 1914
DISCHARGED: Sydney 29 March 1919

rank William Hoddinott applied for his Advance on 13 March 1919. This was approved on the same day. He wanted the money to use for fencing and ploughing, a house, sheds, plough, horses and various other fittings. He eventually had two blocks of land, the first taken up in 1923 (SGP 1923/31) and the second (SP 25/18) in 1925. The blocks were within Lawson Park Soldier Settlement at Leadville and each block consisted of 276 acres. The two blocks were located in the County of Napier, Parish of Narangarie, Land District of Dunedoo. He took up occupation 8 May 1919.

Hoddinott applied several times during 1919 and 1920 for changes to the items on his Advance schedule. In the regime of constant scrutiny that characterised soldier settlement any changes had to be approved by the Department of Lands.

Lees verder op http://soldiersettlement.records.nsw.gov.au/index.php/case-studies/hoddinott-frank-william/
Bron o.a.: National Archives of Australia: B2455, First Australian Imperial Force Personnel Dossiers (Frank William Hoddinott) online: http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/imagine.asp?B=5265924&I=1&SE=1
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 20:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

William Robertson

March 29 – Sir William Robertson, who enlisted in 1877, becomes a field marshal in the British Army, the first man to rise to this rank from private.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1920

William Robertson

Field Marshal Sir William Robert Robertson, 1st Baronet, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, DSO (29 January 1860 – 12 February 1933) was a British officer who served as Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS) from 1916 to 1918 during the First World War. He was the first British Army soldier to rise from private soldier to field marshal. (...)

Following the outbreak of World War I, Robertson served as Quartermaster General and then as Chief of Staff of the British Expeditionary Force (under John French) before being promoted to Chief of the Imperial General Staff in December 1915. As CIGS, Robertson was a strong supporter of BEF commander Douglas Haig, and played a major role in the ousting of Prime Minister Herbert Henry Asquith and his replacement with a Tory-dominated coalition led by David Lloyd George. He was committed to a Western Front strategy focusing on Germany and against what he saw as peripheral operations on other fronts. This stance was at odds with Lloyd George's view that Britain's war effort ought to be focused on the other theatres until the arrival of sufficient US troops on the Western Front, and Robertson resigned as CIGS in February 1918. He then became General Officer Commanding-in-Chief of Eastern Command. After the armistice, he commanded the British Army of the Rhine.

In 1919, Robertson was thanked by Parliament, granted £10,000 and created a Baronet, of Beaconsfield in the County of Buckingham. When he was promoted to field marshal a year later, he became the first man to rise in the British army from the lowest rank (private) to the highest (field marshal).

Robertson died in February, 1933, aged 73.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Robertson
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 20:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

29 March 1920, Commons Sitting

EX-KAISER.


HC Deb 29 March 1920 vol 127 cc873-4 873

Mr. BOTTOMLEY asked the Prime Minister whether, in view of the refusal of the Dutch Government to hand over the ex-Kaiser for trial, the Law Officers of the Crown have been, or will be, consulted as to the possibility of impeaching him in his absence in respect of alleged breaches of the laws of war and numerous crimes against humanity of which, from time to time, he has been accused by His Majesty's Government?

The PRIME MINISTER I am afraid that would be a rather futile proceeding.

Mr. BOTTOMLEY Why futile?

The PRIME MINISTER Well, because it would be. (...)

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1920/mar/29/ex-kaiser
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2010 22:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1916)

29 maart 1916 - In Wortel-Kolonie, aan de grens met Castelré, speelde zich volgend bloederig grensinci­dent af. Een citaat uit “De Duitschers in de Kempen”: “...Aan welke geva­ren de geheime brievendienst, de verdienstelijke mannen, die hem uitoefenen, blootstelt, leert ons het volgende drama, dat aan de grenzen plaats greep in den nacht van 28 op 29 meert. Vier personen waren met de brieven nabij de grenzen, te Wortel gekomen en naderden de grensver­sperring. Hier moes­ten de zakken brieven onder den electri­schen draad gebracht worden. Toen zij met dit werk bezig waren, werden zij door eene Duit­sche patroelje verrast. Een der mannen gelukte er in ongedeerd over de grens­versperring te geraken en zich uit de voeten te maken. M..., van Turnhout en een bewoner van Beerse, raakten bij hunne pogingen tot vluch­ten, aan den draad en werden door de elec­trische strooming doodgebliksemd. Corneel G..., van Turnhout, werd aangehouden, daarbij vielen al de geheime brieven (drie groote zakken), in handen der Duitsche solda­ten. De twee lijken werden naar Wortel gebracht, waar hunne begra­fenis plaats had. Corneel G...., werd in ’t gevang onzer stad opge­sloten. De pakken in beslag genomen brieven bracht men naar het spioenenbureel in de St. Antoniusstraat.” De geëlek­trocuteerden waren de 28-jarige Lodewijk Marinus, een smid uit Turnhout en de 19-jarige schoenmaker Livinus Verstappen uit Beer­se. De gearresteer­de was Cornelis Goversen.

Jan Huijbrechts in “Castelré 1914-1918, Begrensd Overleven”, http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=189:07-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1916&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Gender Colors

Pink for the girl and blue for the boy—ever wonder why? Well, it seems to be a complex issue that no one can quite pinpoint to a certain time. Although things are getting pretty neutral in terms of gender-specific colors, there are a few interesting things that you might like to know:

•Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women has a part in which the youngest sister, Amy, ties a blue ribbon on Meg’s son Demi and a pink ribbon on his twin sister Daisie so that everyone could tell them apart. In the book, this is called a French tradition, and the book dates back to 1868.
•In the Victorian period, there were many works of arts that attributed pink to men and blue to women, with the Virgin Mary robed in navy blue.
•The first school uniforms in England were blue because the dye was cheaper than the others—and the uniforms were meant for boys.
•Audrey Hepburn starred in the film Funny Face (1950s) in which she plays a feminine character dressed in pink
•There is scientific enquiry going on that stresses the fact that women tend to lean towards the warmer colors, while men like cooler colors
•A neuroscientist researcher claims that there might be biological differences that cause women to prefer pink and men to prefer blue.
•"If you like the color note on the little one's garments, use pink for the boy and blue for the girl, if you are a follower of convention." [The Sunday Sentinal, March 29, 1914, an American newspaper article]
•After world war one, in which blue uniforms where used for the male soldiers, blue became a firmly masculine symbol
•There was a “Think Pink” movement in the 1940s that encouraged women to be proud of their femininity
•By the end of the 20th century, the genders had been firmly assigned specific color

http://library.thinkquest.org/08aug/01276/colorsanddesign/gendercolors.html
Uitgebreider hier: http://histclo.com/gender/col/pink/gp-obs.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Diary of Arthur L. Linfoot - January 1914 – December 1918

29 March 1917; Thursday - Up at 7 o’clock. On duty all day. Went to Renninghelst at night on the car1. Called in at the Y M hut and stayed a few minutes at a concert and then had something to eat. Walked back. Swotted a bit French in bed.

1.“Car”: presumably not a tram-car; possibly the motor ambulance again?

Vervangen 20180329: https://www.arthurlinfoot.org.uk/2017/03/29/29-March-1917-Thursday/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bommen op Nederland 1914 - 1918
Hans van Lith

(...) Niet alleen op land vielen bommen, ook schepen liepen gevaar. De koopvaardij en de zeevisserij
hadden het zwaar te verduren tussen 1914 en 1918. Allereerst was er het probleem van duikboten
en zeemijnen. Hoewel neutrale schepen in principe met rust gelaten moesten worden, is het herhaaldelijk
voorgekomen dat Nederlandse schepen werden getorpedeerd. Ook liepen ze nogal
eens op een mijn. Vissers kregen vrij geregeld zeemijnen in hun netten, wat uiteraard grote
gevaren opleverde en ook tot fatale ongelukken heeft geleid. Daarnaast waren er de
patrouillerende Duitse vliegtuigen en zeppelins, die de geallieerde scheepvaart aanvielen. Het
onderscheid tussen vijandelijke en neutrale schepen was niet altijd even gemakkelijk te maken en
daardoor werden soms de verkeerde vaartuigen aangevallen. Bij de Duitse marine (waartoe deze
vliegtuigen behoorden) bestond bovendien een flink wantrouwen tegen de Nederlanders. Zij
verdacht met name onze vissers ervan dat zij 'voorposten voor de Britten' waren. Dat leidde een
tiental keren tot confrontaties met Duitse vliegtuigen, die bommen wierpen naar Nederlandse
schepen. Al of niet na controle van de scheepspapieren! In deze gevallen was dus niet altijd
sprake van een vergissingsaanval, maar soms van een doelbewuste actie. De bommen troffen
overigens nooit doel. Ze vielen steeds in zee, zij het soms op weinige meters afstand van het
betrokken vaartuig. Scherven en golven water sloegen dan over het dek. Een bizar voorval deed
zich voor op 29 maart 1915 met de stoomtrawler Hibernia uit IJmuiden. De bemanning zag een
Duitse tweedekker naderen, rondcirkelen en dan iets laten vallen. Schipper Van der Plas: 'Ik
dacht dat het een bus met een brief was en riep tegen mijn bemanning: "Jongens, hij gooit wat
naar ons, grijp het als je kunt".' Dat lukte gelukkig niet. Het voorwerp kwam naast de vissersboot
in het water terecht en explodeerde met een daverende klap. De brief was meer een bombrief! De
Nederlandse regering protesteerde en Berlijn antwoordde dat de vlieger de trawler verdacht vond
omdat hij geen vlag gehesen zou hebben en dat het schip zich bovendien in gevaarlijk water
bevonden zou hebben... (...)

http://www.collectie.legermuseum.nl/sites/strategion/contents/i004529/arma35%20bommen%20op%20nederland.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1916)

29 maart 1916 - In Wortel-Kolonie, aan de grens met Castelré, speelde zich volgend bloederig grensinci­dent af. Een citaat uit “De Duitschers in de Kempen”: “...Aan welke geva­ren de geheime brievendienst, de verdienstelijke mannen, die hem uitoefenen, blootstelt, leert ons het volgende drama, dat aan de grenzen plaats greep in den nacht van 28 op 29 meert. Vier personen waren met de brieven nabij de grenzen, te Wortel gekomen en naderden de grensver­sperring. Hier moes­ten de zakken brieven onder den electri­schen draad gebracht worden. Toen zij met dit werk bezig waren, werden zij door eene Duit­sche patroelje verrast. Een der mannen gelukte er in ongedeerd over de grens­versperring te geraken en zich uit de voeten te maken. M..., van Turnhout en een bewoner van Beerse, raakten bij hunne pogingen tot vluch­ten, aan den draad en werden door de elec­trische strooming doodgebliksemd. Corneel G..., van Turnhout, werd aangehouden, daarbij vielen al de geheime brieven (drie groote zakken), in handen der Duitsche solda­ten. De twee lijken werden naar Wortel gebracht, waar hunne begra­fenis plaats had. Corneel G...., werd in ’t gevang onzer stad opge­sloten. De pakken in beslag genomen brieven bracht men naar het spioenenbureel in de St. Antoniusstraat.” De geëlek­trocu­teerden waren de 28-jarige Lodewijk Marinus, een smid uit Turnhout en de 19-jarige schoenmaker Livinus Verstappen uit Beer­se. De gearresteer­de was Cornelis Goversen. (Jan Huijbrechts in “Castelré 1914-1918, Begrensd Overleven”)

http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=189:07-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1916&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Stadspark Aalst

De toenmalige schepen van Openbare Werken, Desiré De Wolf, wilde werk verschaffen aan de mensen van Aalst en ze zo onttrekken aan de opeisingen door de Duitsers. Het werk werd aangevangen op 24 juli 1915 en de laatste boom werd geplant op 29 maart 1916. Niet minder dan 20.000 kubieke meter grond werd voor deze werken vervoerd.

Wel 200 verschillende boomsoorten en 100 verschillende struiksoorten werden aangeplant. Veel ervan werden bezorgd door de toenmalige Duitse stadscommandant, een kasteelheer, die speciale bomen uit zijn domein of elders uit Duitsland liet aanvoeren.

De ontwerper Louis Julien Breydel, was een heel gekend bouwkundig architect, die later ook het plan maakte voor het Astridpark te Aalst en o.a. voor de Kruidtuin te Brussel.

http://www.aalst.be/default.asp?printpage=1&artikelid=1369
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI, Vol. 150, March 29, 1916.

THE MARKS OF THE BEAST.

Imperial Beggar. "PITY A POOR WAR-LORD WHO HAS LOST HALF HIS MEN, AND MUST HAVE MORE MONEY IN ORDER TO LOSE THE OTHER HALF."

TO THE GLORY OF FRANCE.

VERDUN, FEBRUARY-MARCH, 1916.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22688/22688-h/22688-h.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

29 March 1918 – Frévent, France – WWI

Foto! (en nog een 'koele' óók) http://www.c3iopscenter.com/currentops/2014/03/29/29-march-1918-frevent-france-wwi/
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Maximilian von Prittwitz

Maximilian Wilhelm Gustav Moritz von Prittwitz und Gaffron (27 november 1848, Bernstadt – 29 maart, 1917 Berlijn) was een Duitse generaal tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog.

Lees verder... http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_von_Prittwitz
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Military aircraft crashes in the south west Midlands - 1917

29/03/1917 A new RE8 was being collected, for delivery to 37 Reserve Squadron. It crashed at Radford aerodrome, in a spin. 2/Lt Arthur Boon of 7/Manchester Regiment, from Buxton in Derbyshire, was killed. He was the son of James Boon, Traver (?) House, near Ruabon and was buried at Coventry, London Road cemy. The serial of the aircraft has not been traced.

http://www.aviationarchaeology.org.uk/marg/crashes1917.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 19:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Pte Philip John Cornish died of wounds 29/03/1917 aged 23

http://www.inmemories.com/Cemeteries/australian.htm
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Beschietingen Parijs, 1918

(...) Op 23 maart 1918 viel 's morgens om 7:20 uur de eerste granaat op Parijs op de Place de la République. Met een tussenpoze van twintig minuten vielen de volgende granaten van noordoost naar zuidwest: Rue Charles V, Boulevard de Strasbourg en twee in de buurt van Gare de l 'Est. Op de eerste dag vielen 21 granaten in Parijs en 1 op Chatillon. Men dacht eerst aan vliegtuigbommen, maar de regelmaat van de inslagen weersprak dat. Later kwam men er via verkenningen uit een vliegtuig achter, dat de granaten waren afgevuurd uit het gebied rond Crépy-en-Laonnois, ongeveer 10 km westelijk van Laon. De kanonnen, die werden bemand door marinemensen onder leiding van een admiraal, stonden op 120 km van Parijs. Op 25 maart blies het tweede kanon na twee schoten zich op waarbij 5 soldaten werden gedood, maar op 29 maart begon het derde en laatste gemaakte kanon met zijn beschietingen.

(...) Van de meer dan 400 afgevuurde granaten troffen 351 granaten Parijs. In Parijs vielen door de beschietingen in totaal 256 doden en ongeveer 620 gewonden. Het grootste aantal doden viel op 29 maart 1918 om 16:27 uur, toen de Eglise St. Gervais tijdens de Goede Vrijdag dienst werd getroffen en het dak instortte. Hierbij vielen 91 doden en 68 gewonden. De kerk ligt achter het Hôtel de Ville.

Na van de eerste schrik bekomen te zijn, ging het gemeentebestuur van Parijs een aantal schuilplaatsen, z.g. abri's, voor de bevolking inrichten en werden zandzakken o.a. rond de Notre Dame gelegd.

Winkels beplakte de ruiten met stroken gompapier om de schade te beperken als de ruiten als gevolg van een granaatinslag kapot gingen, zoals te zien is op nevenstaande foto. De onrust zorgde ervoor dat een groot aantal Parijzenaars de stad verliet. Men schatte 30 tot 50 duizend op het hoogtepunt.

http://www.kubisme.info/kt804.html

Ook hier: Memorial Killed People Bombardment, 29 March 1918

Aanvulling 20180329: https://www.tracesofwar.com/sights/57093/Memorial-Killed-People-Bombardment-29-March-1918.htm
Hier ook: https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/paris_guns
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Jury Frees Miss Edith Rosenbaum
New York Times, Friday 29 March 1918

Miss Edith Rosenbaum, a fashion writer, was acquitted yesterday by a jury in Judge Mayer's Part of the Federal District Court of a charge of having failed to declare a number of evening gowns, which she brought here from France last June. The indictment charged her with having made a false statement when she said she was a non-resident, because her home was in Woodmere, L. I. Miss Rosenbaum swore that she had been a rent payer in Paris since 1907, and that she considered herself a non-resident. James W. Osborne, her counsel, contended that as a non-resident the defendant was not required to declare the gowns, and the jury agreed with him.

http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/rosenbaum_aquittal.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 20:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Henri Vermon

Henri Vermon werd geboren in Hollebeke op 4 september 1881 als zoon van Joseph Vermon en Virginie Bogaert. In het voorjaar van 1901 werd Henri Vermon als twintigjarige opgeroepen voor de loting. Trok Henri een laag nummer of nam hij de dienst over van iemand anders? We weten het niet, maar Henri nam dienst in het leger. Na zijn dienst trad hij in het huwelijk met Marie Leroy. Ze kregen samen drie kinderen.

Toen België in de oorlog betrokken raakte werd Henri Vermon opgeroepen en als de meesten van zijn lichting ingezet voor de verdediging van de forten. Henri werd ingedeeld bij het 2e Linie-Vestingsregiment dat deel uitmaakte van de verdediginggordel van de forten rond Antwerpen. Toen Antwerpen viel vluchtten de Belgische militairen naar Nederland om aan de krijgsgevangenschap in Duitsland te ontkomen.

Henri was een van de meer dan 30.000 Belgische militairen die voor de rest van de oorlog in het neutrale Nederland geïnterneerd werden. Henri werd in kamp Harderwijk ingeschreven op 14 december 1914. In het kamp Harderwijk kwamen zeker nog drie andere Hollebekenaren terecht: Hubert Billen, Cyrille Pattyn en Achille Odent. Hubert Billen en Achille Odent kwamen na de oorlog naar hun dorp terug. Van het lot van Cyrille Pattyn weten we niets. Zij die terugkeerden werden na de oorlog smalend hazen genoemd en ze werden verdacht van desertie. Wat hadden zij immers geleden in vergelijking met hen die de ellende van de Duitse gevangenkampen hadden doorstaan of de gruwel van de loopgraven?

Het leven in het kamp was hard, maar de soldaten konden er leren lezen en schrijven of ze leerden er een stiel. De overlijdensakte van Henri Vermon vermeldt dat hij metselaar was. Henri Vermon overleed op 29 maart 1918 om 6.30 ’s ochtends in de Rooms-Katholieke verpleeginrichting aan de Bruggestraat in Harderwijk. Hij werd op 3 april 1918 tussen 10.00 en 10.30 uur begraven. Nadien werd zijn graf overgebracht naar het Belgisch ereveld waar hij hier ligt in vak A, rij 3, graf 15 naast 209 andere landgenoten.

http://www.wo1.be/ned/evenementen/erbij/2009/oktober/harderwijk1710/body1.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 20:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Little Model by Norman Rockwell, March 29, 1919 Issue of Collier's

http://www.best-norman-rockwell-art.com/norman-rockwell-colliers-cover-1919-03-29-the-little-model.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Mrt 2011 21:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Toespraak van Lenin

Er zijn niet zoveel toespraken bewaard van Vladimir Lenin, en zeker niet op film. Eén van de bekendste is een fragment van een toespraak die hij hield voor de soldaten van het Rode Leger tijdens de Burgeroorlog op 29 maart 1919.

"Kameraden soldaten (van het Rode Leger)! De kapitalisten in Engeland, Amerika en Frankrijk voeren een strijd tegen Rusland. Zij nemen wraak op de Sovjet Republiek van Boeren en Arbeiders omdat deze de macht van landeigenaars en kapitalisten omverwerpt en een voorbeeld stelt voor alle volkeren van de wereld..

Met geld en munitie steunen de kapitalists of in Engeland, Amerika en Frankrijk de Russische landeigenaars, die hun legers klaarstomen vanuit Siberië, de Don en de noordelijke Kaukasus tegen de Sovjets, om de macht van de tsaar, de landeigenaars en de kapitalisten te herstellen.

Neen, dit zal nooit gebeuren! Het Rode Leger heeft zich verenigd, het is opgestaan en begonnen met het verdrijven van de legers van de landeigenaars en de officieren vande Witte Garde, weg van de Volga, het heroverde Riga, en bijna de hele Oekraïne; en het nadert Odessa en Rostov."


Kijk & luister op http://www.masterandmargarita.eu/nl/00start/toespraaklenin.html
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At 9:30 AM 29 March 1918 the members of D Troop 1st Australian Wireless Signal Squadron re-embarking on river ferry to Baghdad, several miles up stream.

Foto... https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C2538
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This day in 1918 in The Record: March 29

Friday, March 29, 1918. The outlook for local farmers is “not as bright as it should be,” the farmers are told today, but “it is the patriotic duty of every tiller of the soil to produce all that he can to meet the nation’s need.”

D. J. Crosby of the state agricultural college addresses the Rensselaer County Farm Bureau at the county court house. He urges farmers to maximize production for the war effort now while organizing to lobby for better treatment from the public and private sectors in the future.

“That there is ground for complaint is true, and that the government should in every way possible relieve the farmer of burdens which are increasing is also true,” Crosby concedes, “but relief will not come through individual discontent and criticism. It must come through planned organization work which will appeal to the state and national governments.”

Before the U.S. entered the war approximately one year ago, farmers were hit with protests from consumers for raising prices while struggling to keep up with the rising cost of production. Crosby warns local farmers against taking their frustrations out on the government in time of war. Doing so would only aid America’s enemies, he says.

“It is the policy of Germany to spread the propaganda of doom and gloom, and that propaganda must find no nourishment in the soils of our farms. The farmer, burdened and often misrepresented as he is, must respond to the appeal of the nation, the appeal of humanity fighting for freedom and, even at the cost of some loss and sacrifice go to work at once to produce more this year than ever before.

“If we fail in this war woe to the farmer and to all other American producers! Freedom and prosperity depend upon the victory we hope to win. The main thing to be done by farmers is to concentrate every energy upon production, and to seek relief for burdens through strong organization.

“If we don’t do what we can to help and the fight for freedom is lost, we will be working for Germany.”

At that point, The Record reports, “there was a demonstration showing that none present would fail to help prevent that.”

Later, an unnamed dairy farmer proposes that the government purchase surplus dairy products.

“Why not add butter and cheese to the rations of our boys in camps?” he asks, “I had a letter from one recently who has been stationed in one camp eight months, and he wrote that in all that time there was not one slice of bread in camp with butter on it.”

http://www.troyrecord.com/article/TR/20180329/NEWS/180329838
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We'll See Them Through - Northwestern Pritzker School of Law in the World War I Era: Soldiers’ Newsletter, 29 March 1918

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL

NEWS LETTER NO. 11. March 29, 1918

My dear friends:

Northwestern University Law School has great cause to be proud of its part – thus far – in the war. Since the declaration of war by the United States, and even before that day, this school has taken its part, and an important one, in the fight for Liberty and Democracy. We have had large and successful delegation in the training camps and ground schools; Northwestern men may be found in the Navy Yards and Cantonments all·over the country; some are guarding valuable crops in Cuba; others are sailing the seas in transports as paymasters; and in the strenuous and arduous work at Washington itself we have played a strong hand. Nearly every branch of Uncle Sam’s service has one or more of our men enrolled in it. One of the first hospital units to go over was supported by eight of our gallant crew. Our ambulance men were among the first on the field; so were our Y.M.C.A. workers. And now that the crucial time has come for the American Expeditionary Force to take its place in the great conflict, N.U.L.S. is again at the front! We have four men in the 149th, which is doing such strenuous work on the front lines: Lieuts. W.B.Wolf, ‘10, and Dixon, ’19, and Privates Seifried, ‘14 and Wagner, 17. Then there are Lieuts. Gilbertson, ’15, of the 7th F.A. and Johnson, ’19, 4th Inf. Besides these, we have 18 or 20 of the alumni and students who are now in France, but whose present assignments are not known o us.

To this little band of our men, now actually and actively fighting this great battle for us, we, the Faculty, the student body, the editors, and all other N.U.L.S. men in service, send our warmest greetings of appreciation and encouragement. That they are doing their part well, we know. They and all those who are to follow them will be able to look us straight in the eye when they return. The only question is – Will we be able to return the look as frankly, confident that we, too, have done the best we could?

Doubtless you will be interested in the following tabulation of Law School men now known to be in service:

Army
Colonels 3
Lieutenant-Colonels 2
Majors 7
Captains 8
First Lieutenants 26
Second ” 60
Aviation Cadets 23
Sergeants 10
Corporals 9
Hospital Orderlies 6
Privates 40
_____
195

Navy
Lieutenants 5
Ensigns 5
Privates 11
_____
21

Marines
Lieutenant 1
Sergeant 1
Private 1
_____
3

Y.M.C.A.
Camp Workers 3

Ambulance
Drivers 2

Rank Unknown 8

Our roll has had several additions since our last edition:

Messrs. Ahlvin, “Torch” Crane, Ball and Sutherland have joined the army, and have been assigned to the Ordnance School at Evanston.

Messrs. Joe Allen and Bedker have gone to Camp Zachary Taylor.

S.E. Basinski is with the C.O.C.N.A., Ft. Winfield Scott, Cal. Benj . Black has paid us another call, and tells us he is Ward “Master ” instead of Chief. What he has to say about the morale and personnel of the U.S.N.A. is worthy of a much larger audience than our editorial sanctum. According to his views, the boches will shrivel up and fade away at the mere sight of our men. E’en so be Charles H. Blim has gone to Kelly Field, Texas, as chauffeur in the Aero service.

L. Newman visited us this week on furlough. He has joined a Q .M. Motor Truck Co., and expects soon to be on his way. He is wearing a corporal’s bars. He reports that J. Bomash has already started for “over there”, in the Spare Parts Dept.

Jaspar Ffrench paid us a call recently. He has received his avaition commission and is now doing instruction work. So also K.P. Grubb.

C.F. Jacobson came in to see us while on furlough from Camp Custer. He is mastering the mazes of radio work, and is mighty pleased with his branch of the service.

M.A. James has already begun to fulfill our prophecy, for its corporal James now! How do you suppose we guessed it, Corp. ?

Lt. Marshall is also among our recent visitors, looking as jaunty as usual.

H.S.Norton declares, “Believe me, this old berg is a glad sight to me.” He is home on a ten-day furlough after seven months in Texas, and looks every inch a soldier. He, also is enthusiastic in his work.

We are sorry to chronicle anything so sad, but friend Rauhoff has the measles ( we trust “had” by this time.) He seems to bear up manfully under the affliction of having to stay in bed – a real bed. But then, he always was a cheerful — fellow! He reports spending the time reviewing Contracts! Some life’!. As soon as “let out” he anticipated going on furlough to Paree “for a much needed rest”.

And Art Hall is a Corporal! Our honors are really coming too fast for us to assimilate them. Knowing his ability for hard work and conscientious effort we are sure the honor was deserved. Congrats!

Corporal T. Stone is authority for two statements: one that army life has added 20 lbs. to his being; and another that privates are getting scarce at Camp Grant. His company promised a consignment of privates in the last shipment, and drew one captain!

Lt. Thorsness, Q. M.C., was sent from camp Grant to Camp Johnston to an officers’ training school. He is now at Camp Meigs, near Washington, and expects soon to set sail. In a recent letter he says “On arrival here was given a position as Asst. Company commander. It seems we are here to take a psychological exam, to find out how normal we are. While at Camp Johnston I saw HarveybFranks and Bill Jarvis Harvey is making up courses for enlisted men, a very responsible position; Bill is asst. instructor, and has been recommended for a commission.”

J.L.Turnbull has joined the Signal Corps and is in the 3rd Depot Battery, Fort Leavenworth.

L.G.Caldwell is at it again. He has started back to France as a civilian, and will let us know later what branch of the service is lucky enough to have him in it.

Peter McNamee, ’16, is one of the latest “rookies” at Camp Grant. Peter is the fourth of his immediate family to don the kahki.

You will be glad to learn that Major R.W.Millar has joined the Judge Advocate General’s forces at Washington, where he will be pleased to pull all N.U.L.S. men out of court martial difficulties, for old times’ sake.

In view of present conditions, our foreigners must have first space. From Jos. H. Wagner, Batt C., 149th Art., A.E.F.

“I certainly was surprised to receive that splendid box of goodies from the faculty and students of dear old Northwestern Law School. I have some news for you. Arthur Dixon, 2nd Lt. has been assigned to our battery. He has asked if I have heard from the law school, he not having heard from it for over a month (all letters and packages have been sent to A.J., but our address for him was incomplete. Whose fault?) Fritz Seifried is also with us. I guess the law school is as well represented in Batt.C. as in any other army unit. The training in our unit is going along as usual, and from reports, our brigade and division is the best one in France. The spirit of the boys is good, even tho our work is getting harder as we advance in our training. I suppose Lloyd George’s offer of peace caused a lot of excitement back in the States. We all hope it comes to something .”

From Lt. L.E. Johnson, 9th Inf., A.E.F.

“Kindly accept a belated message for the news letter from one of the sheep who has certainly strayed a long, long way from home. He’s got into a hek of a lot of trouble and a peck of work, but has many compensations to repay him for it, a few of which he will now relate.

After leaving the boat we entrained and began a three days’ journay, arriving finally at a school where we learned about abstacles fusier metrie and a number of other things not included in the school curriculum. Then I joined this company, joining it on the eve of its departure for the woods where for two months I acted as a lumber jack. we had french axes (model of 1816) to work with. They are modifications of the broad axes you read about in the middle ages history. I learned quite a bit about forestry during my stay in the woods. Best of all, there was plenty of game in the forest – wild pig, deer and wolf being among the specimen. One afternoon a fellow officer and I went hunting. We accomplished getting lost but no more altho we had a beautiful shot at a big buck. We scared him qui te a bit, but could not keep up with him after he started running.

We are now back at drill and hard at work – intensive training I believe is what they call it. We went thru our first hardship the other day when we left at 9 P.M. one night and got back to camp the next night at 10 P.M. It was a tough, sleepless, cold grind, but gave me a whale of an appetite. Its two days since then, and I’ve spent most of these days eating.

This is a rapid sketch of my doings for the past while. I wish to thank the school for its Christmas box—-. Its the thot and spirit which prompted the gift which is especially sheering to me. We cannot see you people back in the States, but we are stirred to redouble our efforts when we read of what you are doing and receive these evidences of your faith in us. And we will make good – America will place men on the firing line who will do their “darndest” for her and for the principles for which she stands. Our faults and failings are being unmercifully exposed, but we are stronger as a nation for it, and when the war is over the army will release to the law, the sciences and the industries men who have been physically hardened and mentally bettered, so that they can take up their civil duties with renewed energy and vigor.”

From Lt. H.L.Jones, Hdqtrs. Detachment, 3rd Aviation Inst.Center, AEF.

“ (in re Christmas box) Let these poor thanks be magnified a thousand times to express my real appreciation of your kindness and thoughtfulness!! Up to the present time, I have received but three “Etrennes”, as the Franch call Christmas boxes, and two of these were from Northwestern. Mercie bien! Since Christmas I have feasted my corpulent self on that vertitable storehouse of delectable dainties – Chocolate, fruitcake, chiclets, etc., ad indigestum!! And I have “fumeyed” Camels and nibbled nut bars!! (How he does make our mouths water.)

Received a fine postal picture of the Major – suppose he continue to ”shed copious quantities of ink for his country”. Received my regular army commission last week, pursuant to the exams which I endured at Fort Sheridan in the remote past before entering the air service. I am at present attached to the Aviation camp here and hope to continue my flying training, but then, I might be ordered back to the States. Mysterious are the ways of the Army! Have been looking and looking for more editions of your newsletters, which did much to enliven my fallen spirits while trying to push myself into the army last summer.”

This from D.L.Traxler, of the 3rd Training Camp, who is beginning to put on the physical aspect of a middleweight champion:

“Horton just returned to the O.T.C. after a measles siege. We are glad to have him back, having been doubly sorry to see him go (his sake and our own – quarantine).

Life at the training camp still possesses the monotonous spice of new subjects every week. Horses have been of special interest to me, and I suspect I have been of quite a little interest to the horses. The first afternoon we had equitiation, I won once and the horse won twice, but this afternoon I stuck on very comfortably the whole time, mounting and dismounting while the horse was moving, according to orders! Being surrounded with Illinois and Wisconsin men here, I have a hot time. Our football victory over Michigan is always a pleasant comeback, and our sweeping victory over Illinois last week was a most opportune rebuttal to many bandied remarks of that week. Tis time for me to wander upstairs into the dark squad room and sink my weary mind on a Hoover pillow.”

A.B.Chipman, from his 3rd O.T.C. at Leon Springs, writes:

“The work is exceedingly interesting. Horses and firing data do not hold such a terrible scare for me. Geometry and Trigonometry both are somewhat rusty to me, but I am gettinghold of it now. A few days ago I ran across Joe Lemen (’16). He is in camp here from Camp Logan. He dropped in for a few minutes and we went over Newsletter No. 9.”

Again “quitting time” has come apace, and we must say Adieu and “the best of luck” to each one of you.

https://sites.northwestern.edu/plrcwwi/student-newsletter-29-march-1918/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2018 7:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Smith, Ross – March 1918 | A World Away | South Australia's War

Palestine - Mar 29th 1918

My dearest Mother.
Only a few lines to tell you I’m well & very busy. We are doing another stunt, attacking Amman & everything is going very well. The enclosed photos are some Capt. Hurley took, don’t let any newspaper people see them! My machine is going very nicely, I did a late job yesterday & had to land in the dark. Away behind the lines I met 15 Huns (I was on my own) but they did not attack & I thought they were a few too many for me so we all went our various ways peacefully. …

With my best love to you & Paw from
Your loving son Ross.

Purple stamp PASSED BY CENSOR No 3025

http://southaustraliaswar.com.au/blog-posts/smith-ross-march-1918/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 29 Mrt 2018 8:17, in toaal 3 keer bewerkt
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Pvt Edward M Beneker, CoD 115th Infantry Regt.

A farmer from Franklyn County, Indiana, Edward was born at South Gate on 20 September 1895. He was drafted into service at Brookville on 29 March 1918 and received his training at Camp Gordon, Georgia and at Camp McClellan, Alabama before being transferred to the 115th Infantry and sent overseas in June 1918. (...)

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/on-this-day/23-october-1918-pvt-edward-m-beneker-died-on-this-day/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2018 8:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Remembering Macclesfield's Great War: Belfield, George A, Gunner 160418, “V” 15th T.M. Bty, Royal Field Artillery - Died 29th March 1917 in France, aged 19

EARLY LIFE - Son of Francis and Frances Anne Belfield, of 1 Waterloo Street West, Macclesfield, Cheshire.

COMMEMORATION - Gunner George Belfield has no known grave and is commemorated on panel ref. Bay 1 of the Arras Memorial, France. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission holds casualty details for Gunner George Belfield.
In Macclesfield, Gunner George Belfield is commemorated on the Park Green, Town Hall, St Michael’s Church and Christ Church School war memorials.

http://macclesfieldreflects.org.uk/1917/03/29/belfield-george-a/
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ILLUSTRATION FROM 'LA BAIONNETTE', 29TH MARCH 1917

https://www.art.com/products/p21692731387-sa-i7391713/georges-barbier-illustration-from-la-baionnette-29th-march-1917.htm
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Weather Wednesday - 29 March 1916 - From the Freemans Journal, 29 March 1916

THE WEATHER

March is going out like a shorn lamb. It is intensely cold. We in Ireland have escaped the extreme cold of England and Scotland but the weather here, too, has been severe. Trams have been stopped by the snowdrifts in Great Britain. South of Crewe, in the heart of England, the Irish express from London was snowed up for ten hours. The telegraph wires are down.
It is recorded that one train which forced its way through with the plan of an Irish division at the charge came into Crewe ”dragging behind it miles of telegraph wire that had fouled the line”
One result of the stoppage of mail train and telegraph is the cutting off of communication with the outer world. Little news of any kind has come through and our readers will today find that the weather can be the most tyrannical and indiscriminate at
Heavy snow and frost at the end of March are not without precedent. But they are unusual as to be quite a novelty to many of our day. The snowing up of the trains between London and Holyhead is rare even in mid-winter, and the passengers who were prisoners for ten hours had an unusual and extremely unpleasant experience. Their sufferings in the cold were intense.
In Ireland March was a severe and trying month and last week was one of the worst portions of it. The temperature was below freezing point every night in all stations where observations are taken, and in several of the souther towns the thermometer descended below the lowest record during the week in Edinburgh. The temperature of Limerick, open to the mild influence of the Gulf Stream, went as low as that of Edinburgh, while Galway, Waterford and Kilkenny reached 26 degrees, being 13 degrees lower than the Scottish capital. The highest temperature in Dublin last week was 46.2. In the closing week of March last year it went up to 56 degrees. The lowest record in the city last week was 27.3 A year before the lowest was 31.5. The citizens rose several morning last week to find their streets a sheet of ice. The frost melted away rapidly before the sun , but there were several falls both of hail and snow which, though it did not lie deep on the ground, covered it with white for a while. The temperature as is seen from the above varied considerably and spells of extreme cold followed rapidly on comparably high readings. These rapid changes caused many to suffer from colds and the weather was trying to the old and delicate, and one result of it was an increase in respiratory disease.
There were no fewer than twenty eight deaths from pneumonia and thirty two from bronchitis in Dublin last week, while the deaths from these diseases numbered 47 and 87 throughout the country.
Agricultural operations have been seriously impeded by the March weather. The short intervals of frost came between long and heavy spells of rain. There was little sun. The fields were sodden and un-workable, and men, animals, machinery and implements were idle except for what ever carting there was to be done. The month on many holdings was almost a blank, and it is hoped that April may bring a favourable change that may enable agriculturalists to make up for lost time. The month was very unfortunate for preparations had been made for heavy cropping. But the seeding season was broken by the rains and the soaked condition of the land and it is feared that the snowing on all but the most arable lands will be very late and that there will be in any case a larger amount of fallow than was intended. The attention required now for corn will postpone in many places the sowing of potatoes until the end of April and May. The root crops will demand special attention this season, and it is unfortunate for them that this unfavourable March should follow on the bad harvest of last year. The frosts that we have had this week will prove helpful in breaking up the ground sodden by the rain, and is a good preparation for the dry and sunshiny weather that is looked to to save the agricultural situation.

http://www.galwaydecadeofcommemoration.org/content/blog/2016-blog-archive/weather-wednesday-29-march-1916
_________________

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Personal Files Book 12, 1 March - 29 April 1916 - Monash, Sir John KCMG KCB

Description - File of papers relating to the First World War service of Brigadier General John Monash, 4th Infantry Brigade. This file, originally part of Book 12, covers 1 March 1916 to 29 April 1916 and includes documents relating to troop training, specifically on machine guns and grenades, a booklet collating best practice for minor operations, a letter requesting the establishment of an officers' club at Tel-el-kebir camp, and graphs and tables relating to the strength of the 4th Brigade.

Extreem leesvoer! https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RCDIG0000610

Letters written and received by Field Marshal Lord William Birdwood, 29 March 1915 – 29 December 1915

This folder contains 21 letters received by Field Marshal Lord William Birdwood from men of various military and civilian positions between 29 March and 29 December 1915. Some of the correspondents featured in this file are General Sir Ian Hamilton, Lord Charles Hardinge (Viceroy of India), and Sir Thomas Noble Mackenzie (New Zealand High Commissioner).
This file contains: Letter from Lord Charles Hardinge to Birdwood, 29 March 1915 [includes envelope]

Het houdt niet op... https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RCDIG0000015/
_________________

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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2018 8:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

29 March 1915 | Centenary of WW1 in Orange

Orange orchardists supply apples to British Hospital Ships in the North Sea.

http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/events/29-march-1915/

En het bijbehorende krantenartikel uit de Leader van 29 maart 1915:

Fruit for Our Soldiers
Mr. W. E. West, of' "Carnarvon,"
Canobolas, has received the following
letter from the secretary of the Red
Cross Society, N.S.W. division:
Will you please accept my apologies
for not replying to your letter of the
6th inst., sooner, but by, some means
it got put away with correspondence
that had been replied to, and hence
the delay.
I am verysorry to hear that your
orchardists suffered damage by hail
storms, and hope the ultimate loss will
not be as great as you expected. It is
exceedingly thoughtful and kind of
your growers to make up in some other
way the value of the fruit that they
intended to send. Under the circum
stances I would not ask them to do so,
and we gratefully accept their will for
the deed. If, however, your growers
would care to send us anything for dis
play, and for sale at our stall at the
Royal Agricultural Show we would be
very pleased to accept it.
I am directed by my society to con
vey to you their best thanks your
personal efforts in assisting the Red
Cross. Would you also please convey
to the grower the personal thanks of
Lady Patey, who has written to me
from on board the "Orsova," asking
me to do so. Lady Patey says:—
"Will you please convey to the fruit
growers of New South Wales, who have
contributed toward the consignment
of apples, for the North Sea Hospital
ships, my sincere thanks for their gen
erous gift, which will be much apprec
iated. As a sailor's wife I know what
an anxious and hard time they are
having."
I am sure your growers will be plea
sed to know that their efforts have al
ready been appreciated by the wife of
our Admiral.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/119913539
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2018 9:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

OFF THE SPANISH COAST, MARCH 29TH 1915

Object description - A view from a ship of part of the Spanish coastline, with the sea in the foreground and a cloudy sky above.

Label - Below the drawing Hillier describes the context in handwritten text: 'Our small section of the M.E.F. is now well on the way to 'Gib': a sharp lookout being kept all the way for enemy submarines. But the chief topic is "Will they (the fleet) have 'got through' without waiting for our invaluable help?"! The light of after aspects [?] makes that seem rather grim humour. Many of us are certainly very new to this sort of thing, as yet'.

Schets... https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/13052
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 14953
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Mrt 2018 9:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HANSARD → 29 March 1920 → Commons Sitting → TRADE AND COMMERCE.

IMPORTATIONS FROM GERMANY.

Mr. PERRING asked the President of the Board of Trade if the shipments arriving in this country of cheap fancy and other goods from Germany come within the definition of dumping, having regard to the fact that they are imported here much below cost of production in this country; if he is aware that these importations, instead of checking profiteering on the part of traders here, really provide opportunities for merchants and dealers to secure larger profit than those accruing from handling home productions; and, inasmuch as these foreign-made goods do not financially benefit the consumer or user, if he will hasten the introduction and passage of the promised Anti-dumping Bill into law, thereby providing means of augmenting the national revenue in the interests of State as against middlemen securing unreasonable profits by reason of the favourable German exchange?

Mr. BRIDGEMAN I do not think that dumping is generally held to mean the export to this country of goods at prices below the one at which they can be manufactured here. I am not aware of the facts alleged in the second part of the question. As regards the third part, I am not able at present to make any statement as to the introduction of measures to deal with this subject.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1920/mar/29/importations-from-germany
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
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