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Honden en andere dieren tijdens WO1
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Limburgse Jager



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BerichtGeplaatst: 02 Jan 2010 11:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zag laatst op, ik meen, Geocrafic Channel en chimpansee die getraind werd/was om met een explosief op zijn rug onder een tank te kruipen. Walgelijke vertoning trouwens. Misbruik van de onschuldigen!!
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Ben op dit moment de historie van het Franse 137e RI in zijn geheel aan het uitzoeken en in boekvorm te zetten. Als er iemand is die mij aan gegevens kan helpen, welkom
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Price of Glory



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BerichtGeplaatst: 02 Jan 2010 13:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

In Couin (Somme gebied) staat ook nog een monument dat de dieren die in de oorlog werden gebruikt en stierven herdenkt.




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BerichtGeplaatst: 20 Okt 2010 21:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote



Franco-British carrier pigeon which makes long distance flights

French pigeon trainer, France, during World War I. This photograph shows a French Army officer holding a carrier pigeon ready to fly. Below the rank chevrons on his sleeve he is wearing a badge of a flying pigeon, showing he was a pigeon trainer. He has the weather-beaten skin of a countryman.

On September 11, 1914, the French gave 15 pigeons to the British Intelligence Service. By 1918 there were some 20,000 birds and 380 expert pigeon trainers in the British Army alone.

[Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. British army carrier pigeons in France. A Franco-British carrier pigeon which makes long distance flights.']

digital.nls.uk/74548778
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2010 21:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote



Messenger dog with its handler, in France, during World War I

Messenger dog with its handler, in France, during World War I. This collie dog worked as a messenger in the front line under constant gunfire. A scrolled up message can be seen attached to the dogs collar. Dogs were also used in the trenches to kill rats and mice, thereby protecting food supplies. In addition to carrying out messenger duties and various other tasks, a regimental mascot also helped to maintain the troops morale.

Most of the armies involved in 'the Great War' had specially trained dogs in many of their regiments. These dogs performed a wide range of important tasks, including carrying messages, sentry duty, acting as decoys, ambulance duties and killing vermin. Keeping a pet also helped to raise the morale of the soldiers, by adding an element of domestic home life to the trench.

[Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. "Bruce", a well known messenger dog who is always working under shell fire in the line.']

digital.nls.uk/74549020
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2010 21:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote




Triumphant dog sitting atop a gun surrounded by gunners, France, during World War I

Triumphant dog sitting atop a gun surrounded by gunners, France, during World War I. Proudly perched on top of what looks like a howitzer, this pet dog was the regimental mascot of the artillery gunners also gathered round the gun. Despite the many dangers posed by life in and near the front line, many regiments kept pet dogs and cats. Keeping a regimental mascot also helped to maintain the troops morale.

There were so many artillerymen fighting in 'the war to end all wars', that, on many occasions, there were more gunners supporting an offensive than infantrymen leading the attack. Given the massive number of infantry soldiers that regularly went 'over the top', this lone fact offers a revealing insight into the devastating power of artillery units during World War I.

[Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. The mascot of a battery who are kept very busy shelling the Germans.']

digital.nls.uk/74549082
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Highlander



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BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Okt 2010 9:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote



Tijdens onze trip in de Meuse kwamen we dit monument tegen (in Neuville-Les-Vaucouleurs, dicht bij de geboorteplaats van Jeanne d'Arc).

Hier was een 'hospitaal' voor de ezels en muildieren die geblesseerd geraakten. Er waren blijkbaar permanent 300 dieren voor verzorging ondergebracht...
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BerichtGeplaatst: 20 Sep 2012 20:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote


1295983: A German messenger dog leaps over a trench near Sedan, the message is attached to the dog’s collar, May 1917
Quote:
The duties that animals carried out were invaluable for the war effort. They were used to transport troops, artillery, the injured, supplies and messages as well as laying telegraph lines and mines, detecting gas, explosives and trapped bomb victims, or simply to raise morale as mascots or companions. The animals that were employed for these tasks were just as varied, horses, camels, elephants, dogs, pigeons and canaries. More animals died in the First World War than any other conflict, including eight million horses, but the inspiring and often tragic stories of the great devotion and loyalty shown will always be remembered.

http://www.topfoto.co.uk/gallery/wwianimals/index.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 28 Apr 2014 17:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Animals in War (WWI)
- a tribute. Using Pathé's WWI footage, this tribute film thanks the forgotten army of WWI. Millions of animals gave their lives. They were selected for their variety of natural skills and instincts and they displayed unwavering courage even when exposed to extreme conditions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_L5tQerJwA
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 20 Mei 2014 22:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dogs at War: Three-Legged Dog Delivers Crucial Message in WWI

For centuries military dogs have played important roles on the battlefield.

By Rebecca Frankel, for National Geographic - Published May 16, 2014

As long as men have been fighting wars, dogs have likely been somewhere on or near the battlefield. And more often than not, dogs have contributed bravely on the front lines, whether officially trained to do so or motivated by loyalty to soldiers.

The history of war dogs is deep: The Corinthians used them with success against the Greeks. The Romans used dogs to guard their legions and raise alarms, as did Attila the Hun, who placed them around his camps for added protection.

The United States military has lagged behind the rest of the world's armies in using dogs, even though the idea was introduced early on. Benjamin Franklin made a somewhat lackluster attempt to advocate for using dogs (though more as weapons) in 1755.

Beginning with the Revolutionary War and through World War I, dogs had a mostly unofficial presence alongside American soldiers, coming to combat either as a beloved pet of a general, as a mascot, or as the stray-made-companion of an obliging soldier.

It wasn't until the onset of World War II that the U.S. War Department, emulating successful war dog programs in Europe, finally set into motion the military dog program that would evolve (and lapse and evolve again) over the next several decades. Started in World War II and continuing through Korea and Vietnam, today the Military Working Dog Program deploys dogs to Iraq and Afghanistan.

In the coming days, we take a look back at a handful (of the many thousands) of war dogs whose stories are powerful testaments to the important roles they played in saving lives—and lifting spirits.

Ernest Harold Baynes, a reporter who documented the use of animals during World War I, wrote, "The fame of the war dogs may well rest on the splendid work they actually did; it needs no support from the stories of what some of the sentimentalists would like to believe they did."

Satan Saves the Day

During World War I, at the 1916 Battle of Verdun, a small contingent of French soldiers found themselves boxed in by German forces.

They had been told by the French command to hold their position until reinforcements could be sent. For days they had managed to hold off the Germans, but no one had come to relieve them. Telephone and telegraph lines were down, and no homing pigeons remained to send word.

The scorched and cratered terrain beyond their trenches was too exposed for any human to cross—seven men had already been cut down trying to deliver messages to command. And although one dog had managed to successfully deliver seven messages, he too had been killed.

With food and ammunition depleted and the men's hopes waning, the Germans unleashed a fresh onslaught of artillery and gunfire. The French troops cautiously peered over the top of their trenches. A large, black animal was bounding in their direction. From a distance it was difficult to tell exactly what the charging four-legged creature was. It was wearing a monstrous gas mask, and something was stretched across its shoulders that extended almost like wings.

Then one of the soldiers, a handler named Duval, recognized the animal as his own—a messenger dog named Satan. Duval called out to the dog, urging him on. Leaping over the cratered earth, Satan raced toward the sound of his handler's voice so fast that some of the men later swore he was flying.

The Germans unloaded their arsenal in an all-out attempt to stop this one dog. But Satan continued on, maneuvering in the crisscross pattern he'd been trained to follow, even as bullets snapped the air around him and exploding shells threw up shrapnel and chunks of smoking earth.

A bullet clipped the dog and he stumbled. Then another caught him in the leg, breaking it, and he faltered again, this time hitting the ground.

Seeing his dog go down, Duval climbed out of the trench, exposing himself to enemy fire so that he could call once more to Satan. Duval was shot dead within seconds. But, having heard his handler's voice again, Satan mustered the strength to lift himself off the ground. He started to run again, this time on three legs, his lame limb hanging useless as he ran until, finally, he reached the safety of the French trenches.

The men lifted the limping dog and gently removed the mask, pulling a tube from around his neck to read the message inside: "For God's sake, hold on. We will send troops to relieve you tomorrow." The winglike contraption on Satan's back was a harness balancing two small baskets over the dog's shoulders, each one containing a carrier pigeon.

The French commander scrawled two identical notes describing the German battalion's position. The notes were put in small metal tubes and tied to the pigeons' legs. The two birds lifted into the air, soaring into the sky. The German snipers were waiting for them. A shot picked off the first bird, but the other somehow made it through the spray, flying in the direction of its coop.

Soon the sound of roaring French guns could be heard. The message had been received.

Rebecca Frankel is a senior editor at Foreign Policy Magazine. Her book, War Dogs: Tales of Canine Heroism, History, and Love, will be released in October. Zie hier: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1137279680/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Benny Vinke



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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mei 2014 11:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote



http://blogs.utexas.edu/culturalcompass/tag/exhibitions/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 23 Aug 2014 6:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mooi artikel (met heel wat foto's) over katten tijdens de Eerste WO vind je hier: http://io9.com/a-gallery-of-cats-who-served-in-world-war-i-1624713212
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Sep 2014 21:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Vergiftet, zerfetzt, gepeinigt: Das Leiden der Kriegspferde

http://www.nwzonline.de/oldenburg-kreis/kultur/hoher-blutzoll-unter-schlachtroessern-vergiftet-zerfetzt-gepeinigt-das-leiden-der-kriegspferde_a_13,6,1876100687.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Sep 2014 21:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The animals that served in the first world war – in pictures

During the first world war millions of animals were used for transport, to carry vital communications and as companions to the troops. This week, the PDSA posthumously awarded an honorary Dickin Medal – the ‘animal VC’ – to the horse Warrior, on behalf of all the animals involved. Warrior served throughout the whole campaign with General Jack Seely, surviving machine-gun attacks, shells and the mud of Passchendaele.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/gallery/2014/sep/03/the-animals-that-served-in-the-first-world-war-in-pictures
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BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Sep 2014 13:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Paarden in eerste wereldoorlog, archieven online

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=26797&highlight=dieren+++oorlog
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BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Sep 2014 13:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dieren in oorlog:
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=17356&highlight=dieren+++oorlog
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Okt 2014 17:56    Onderwerp: Hond trekt Belgisch machinegeweer Reageer met quote


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BerichtGeplaatst: 16 Nov 2014 12:28    Onderwerp: The dog whisperer Reageer met quote

The dog whisperer


Quote:
IN APRIL 1917, IN VILLERS-BRETONNEUX, northern France, war was raging. The Germans were advancing on the British; a small brigade of Australian soldiers had emerged from the trenches repeatedly to push them back. The enemy captured a strategic position, knocking out all lines of communication, but one member of the Allied forces was able to make it through the heavy shellfire that pounded down on the treacherous seven miles separating the command from the front: a small retriever, a messenger dog named Darkie, who covered that distance in only 55 minutes. Of all the reports sent from the front, Darkie's was the only one received.

All along the front during the months of heavy fighting, communications were dispatched via messenger dogs. It was dangerous work. One dog was shot; a bullet split his jaw, nearly detaching it. Still, the dog, ironically named Smiler, crossed almost two miles in only 20 minutes. Sulky came close to having her leg cut off. Dick caught shrapnel spray and a bullet. Despite the injuries, his handler reported, he returned in "good spirit." But shrapnel had also "lodged close to the spine," the handler later found. "Through all his sufferings the dog carried out his duties cheerfully and most faithfully until he was overtaken by death."

The list goes on.
What would compel a severely wounded dog to carry on, never retreating in pain or fear, to complete his run and deliver the message he was carrying?
Lt. Col. Edwin Hautenville Richardson ascribed the dogs' drive to "two qualities which are usually natural to the canine mind…: The affection for a master and the love of reward." Fostering this admirable behavior, in turn, required two commitments on the part of a handler. First, there was never to be any cruelty or abuse used in training. The second element of the human-dog contract was more elusive, the thing that could overpower any temptation or looming threat: trust.

"[W]hen there is complete understanding and trust between the messenger dog and its keeper, the honourable return of the dog with the message is assured," Richardson wrote in his 1920 book, British War Dogs: Their Training and Psychology.


Boeiend artikel met heel veel foto's:
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/10/22/the_dog_whisperer_war_dogs_world_war_i
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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Mrt 2015 16:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Tentoonstelling in Maastricht
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=32663
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mrt 2015 10:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oorlogsdieren in de Grote Oorlog
De verlenging van onze vermogens


http://nhmmaastricht.nl/download/oorlogsdiereninwoi_alejandrochavezsaenz.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Mrt 2015 16:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ezel vervoert 70mm St. Chamond in woi in DOA



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BerichtGeplaatst: 17 Mei 2017 8:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Animals That Helped Win World War I

Newly digitized photos tell the story of animals that fought as soldiers during the Great War


Rags was as brave and hardworking as the American soldiers he fought alongside during World War I. But one key detail set him apart from the men serving in the First Division American Expeditionary Forces: He was a dog.

The stray dog turned soldier was just one of the estimated millions of dogs, horses, camels and other animals that served during the Great War. Often referred to as “military mascots,” these beasts of burden typically acted as soldiers’ companions, boosting morale when times got rough for soldiers living thousands of miles away from home.

But military mascots didn’t just lend a supportive paw: They did real work on the battlefield. Thanks to their speed, strength or agility (depending on the species), they’d take on important tasks like lugging munitions and other cargo, carrying crucial messages between units and sniffing out buried mines. But many of these animals never received any recognition for their hard work and dedication, and their short lives were largely forgotten—until now.

Recently, the National Archives completed a massive scanning project, digitizing 63,000 World War I photos for its American Unofficial Collection of World War Photographs (165-WW) record series. The extensive collection, which took two years to get online, contains images obtained from the U.S. Army Signal Corps, various federal and state government agencies and the American Red Cross. While a majority of the collection contains images of soldiers participating in various stages of military life, from training for battle to engaging in active warfare, archivists noticed something else in the photos: animals.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/animals-that-helped-win-world-war-I-180963042/#hyCHHRD8kH1i7IUZ.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
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BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Mei 2017 22:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
http://m1.paperblog.com/i/83/838367/heroes-olvidados-primera-guerra-mundial-1914--L-BwHCEt.png


http://es.paperblog.com/los-heroes-olvidados-de-la-primera-guerra-mundial-1914-1918-838367/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Mei 2017 22:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
http://m1.paperblog.com/i/83/838367/heroes-olvidados-primera-guerra-mundial-1914--L-BwHCEt.png


http://es.paperblog.com/los-heroes-olvidados-de-la-primera-guerra-mundial-1914-1918-838367/
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