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Stow Maries aerodrome

 
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Tandorini



Geregistreerd op: 11-6-2007
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BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Dec 2010 19:11    Onderwerp: Stow Maries aerodrome Reageer met quote

Stow Maries is a village and civil parish in the English county of Essex. It is located on the western (inland) end of the Dengie peninsula and forms part of the Purleigh ward in the Maldon district.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stow_Maries

The requirement for an aerodrome at Stow Maries originated in the Government response to German Zeppelin airship and Gotha fixed- wing bomber attacks on the British mainland during the First World War.

The first aircraft to arrive at the new aerodrome in September 1916 belonged to ‘B’ Flight, 37 (Home Defence) Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. The Squadron was charged with the eastern aerial defence of the capital. The Headquarters Flight moved into ‘The Grange’, Woodham Mortimer. ‘A’ Flight was despatched to Rochford (now Southend Airport) and ‘C’ Flight to Gardeners Farm, Goldhanger.

In the earliest part of its existence the accommodation consisted of wooden hutting and tents. The buildings now present on the airfield are later additions when the possibility still existed of the aerodrome being made permanent.

The first commanding officer of Stow Maries Aerodrome was Lieutenant Claude Ridley. Educated at St Pauls School, London, he was barely 20 years of age but had already seen service with the Royal Flying Corps on the Western Front.

Verder lezen:
http://www.stowmaries.com/history1.asp
(Mod Edit) Nieuwe site http://www.fosma.co.uk/

Luchtfoto van het voormalig vliegveld:



Remembrance Weekend at RFC Stow Maries:
http://forum.planetalk.net/viewtopic.php?t=9915

Meer foto's:
http://airfields.fotopic.net/c1614513.html

Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/STOW-MARIES-AERODROME/247392008958

A short film - "Loss" - based around Stow Maries, by Giles Ford-Crush:
http://www.gilesfordcrush.co.uk/

http://www.stowmaries.com/index.asp
http://www.crossandcockade.com/blog.asp?Display=58
_________________
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"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
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BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Dec 2010 21:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Over het project:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BribGLszN9o

90 jaar na de ingebruikname van het vliegveld landt er een Sopwith Camel op het vliegveld.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCkpn8mlfxE&feature=related

Stow Maries Aerodrome Tour

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aejUc_rUh5c&feature=player_embedded#!
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
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BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Mrt 2011 20:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Vintage Fly-In Day at Stow Maries Aerodrome – 8th May 2011

Stow Maries World War One Aerodrome is pleased to announce that it will hold its first vintage fly in day on Sunday 8th May 2011. Gates open at 9am and the event ends at 6pm the same day.

This is the historic aerodromes first event of this type and it is hoped it will draw attendance from wide and far as it has already seen great success at Maldon District Heritage events where it has been a sell out for the past two years.

Aircraft will arrive prior to 12 o’clock that day and will be parked on the aerodrome for the public to view. There will be commercial stalls present as well as refreshments plus a launch of ‘Turners Defence’, an aviation Great War adventure, by its author Chris Davey who will be present to sign copies of his book. There will be a display of military vehicles as well as Great War reneactors demonstrating life in WW1. Visitors will also be able to view a collection of vintage tractors to illustrate the sites farming heritage since it was closed by the RAF in 1919.

Tour guides will be available to escort visitors around the 1918 vintage buildings and members of the sites latest addition, the Hawk Walk team, will be present to introduce the public to a Harris Hawk and Kestrel as well as empart information on the wildlife conservation side of the aerodrome.

It is hoped that a park and ride system from Maldon will be in operation on the day as well as parking on the aerodrome itself. Details will be announced prior to the event. Entry is by cash only at the aerodrome entrance on the day. The entrance fee is £8 per person.

Aircraft that have been invited are mostly those belonging to the Great War period. These include the Great War display team plus a Royal Aircraft Factory BE2, a De Havilland DH2 fighter, a Sopwith Pup fighter and representing the German Air Service, a Fokker Triplane and a Fokker Eindekker. Later dated aeroplanes include Tiger Moths and a WW2 dated Auster observation aircraft.

The sites owner Russell Savory said. ‘We are really looking forward to hosting people on our first fly in day. We have already had enquiries regarding attendqance so it looks promising. Its something that we hope will promote not only what we are doing here at Stow Maries Aerodrome but will also Maldon District and that visitors will come back to both. We are now keeping our fingers crossed for the weather on the day and because of some of the aircrafts ages, that they will be serviceable for us. With events involving such types there is always the variables involved.

Stow Maries Aerodrome lies off of Hackmans Lane, Cold Norton CM3 6RN. Telephone number 01245808744. It is open to the public on Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays 10am to 4pm.
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 18:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Foto's op Flickr:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/callumd/sets/72157625624790962/with/5273477399/

Op photobucket:

http://s320.photobucket.com/albums/nn332/outdug/Stow%20Maries%20Aerodrome%209-1-11/#!cpZZ1QQtppZZ16

En hier:

http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/other-wwi-aviation/50434-remembrance-weekend-rfc-stow-maries.html
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
Julius Caesar(100 VC - 44 VC)
http://nl.escertico.wikia.com/wiki/Militaria_Wiki
http://tandorini.wordpress.com/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 16:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The requirement for an aerodrome at Stow Maries originated in the Government response to German Zeppelin airship and Gotha fixed- wing bomber attacks on the British mainland during the First World War.

The first aircraft to arrive at the new aerodrome in September 1916 belonged to ‘B’ Flight, 37 (Home Defence) Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. The Squadron was charged with the eastern aerial defence of the capital. The Headquarters Flight moved into ‘The Grange’, Woodham Mortimer. ‘A’ Flight was despatched to Rochford (now Southend Airport) and ‘C’ Flight to Gardeners Farm, Goldhanger.

In the earliest part of its existence the accommodation consisted of wooden hutting and tents. The buildings now present on the airfield are later additions when the possibility still existed of the aerodrome being made permanent.

The first commanding officer of Stow Maries Aerodrome was Lieutenant Claude Ridley. Educated at St Pauls School, London, he was barely 20 years of age but had already seen service with the Royal Flying Corps on the Western Front.

Following a period of organisation and training at Stow Maries the first recorded operational flight took place from the aerodrome on the night of 23rd/24th May 1917 when Ridley (now promoted to Captain) and Lieutenant G Keddie were ordered aloft in response to a large Zeppelin raid targeting London. They scored no success on that occasion but as time went on the amount of operational flights grew as did the aircraft establishment of the station.

Both day and night patrols are recorded but it was to be ‘C’ Flight at Goldhanger that claimed the Squadrons first confirmed destruction of an enemy machine, when during the early hours of 17th June 1917, 2nd Lieutenant L. P Watkins was credited with the downing of Zeppelin L48 at Theberton in Suffolk. This was to be the last Zeppelin brought down in Great Britain during the war.

One of the stations busiest days was 7th July 1917 when aircraft were ordered after a formation of twenty two Gotha bombers heading for London. Stow Maries pilots engaged the enemy aircraft in a running fight and scored several hits. Fire was returned however and the ground crews found a number of bullet holes in the returning aircraft.

In the summer of 1917 ‘A’ Flight was posted from Rochford to Stow Maries effectively doubling the size of the station. At the same time the stations first commander Claude Ridley departed to form a new Squadron at Rochford.

Day and night patrols continued but it was the fragility of the aircraft of the period and the inexperience of the young pilots that caused the loss of aircrew from the station. June 1917 saw the loss of 2nd Lieutenant Roy Mouritzen from Western Australia in a flying accident and July of the same year serious injury to Captain E Cotterill through engine failure. Captain B Quinan crashed at Woodham Walter on a training flight and was severely injured. He died in July 1918.

1918 saw continued losses at the aerodrome, Captain A Kynoch in an aerial collision at night, Lieutenant E Nicholls in another flying accident on the aerodrome and finally 2nd Lieutenant C Milburn in an accident near the edge of the flying field.

Lieutenant Nicholls and 2nd Lieutenants Mouritzen and Milburn are buried in the churchyard of St Mary and St Margaret, Stow Maries, as is Stow’s first commanding officer, Claude Ridley who died as a Wing Commander during the second World War, from natural causes.

During the latter half of 1918 building continued and the aerodrome took on the familiar form it still holds today. The Headquarters Flight moved in from Woodham Mortimer and Stow Maries became a very busy place. An RAF survey at this time recorded 219 personnel and 16 aircraft. Completion of the aerodrome was scheduled for December 1918 but the war ended in November and some of the buildings were never completed.

‘C’ Flight moved to Stow Maries from Goldhanger in February 1919 bringing the total staffing levels to around 300 personnel and 24 aircraft, the first time the whole Squadron had been located at one Station. It signalled the end for the Essex aerodrome however and the following month the Squadron moved to Biggin Hill in Kent, leaving the site empty

The site returned to agriculture and only in 1940 did an RAF aircraft return to the airfield when a 242 Squadron Hurricane force landed with combat damage.

The following years have seen the buildings used for both agriculture and accommodation. They now find themselves subject of a sympathetic restoration project to restore the aerodrome to its former glory.

Ivor Dallinger - Curator

http://www.stowmaries.com/history1.asp

Foto's:

http://www.stowmaries.com/galleryindex.asp
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
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BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Mei 2011 14:53    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Het was daar een mooie dag zo te zien.

http://forum.planetalk.net/viewtopic.php?t=10234
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
Julius Caesar(100 VC - 44 VC)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2012 19:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

3rd Vintage Fly In 5th, 6th & 7th May 2012.

Foto's te zien op hun FB-pagina:



Commentaar bij deze foto:
An ORIGINAL 'Crossley Tender' (our Beryl was quite jealous!) PLUS it is 'road worthy, taxed & DROVE to SMA under its own power' - the driver said that he had had NO problems with traffic wardens since fitting the Lewis Machine Gun!
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
Julius Caesar(100 VC - 44 VC)
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http://tandorini.wordpress.com/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Nov 2012 20:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Stow Maries: How warfare took to the air
By Emma Kasprzak

Britain's role in aerial warfare during World War II is well documented but a dedicated team of volunteers is hoping to educate future generations about the pilots of World War I from a restored airfield in Essex.

Stow Maries Aerodrome is thought to be the most intact WWI airfield in Europe and it has now been recognised in an annual awards ceremony which acknowledges people who have rescued heritage at risk.

The team behind the site won the People's Choice award in the English Heritage Angel Awards for restoring the site, whose buildings had at one stage been used for storage or left to become overgrown with brambles.

Observation flights

Stow Maries was originally a hillside farm but in September 1916 it was requisitioned by the government and the site was transformed with the arrival of 37 (Home Defence) Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps.

Powered flight was only a decade old when WWI began and the RAF was still four years away but both Germany and Britain were keen to put their new flying machines to work and both sides began observation flights to spy on troop movements from the air.

"The British met the Germans coming the other way [on observation flights] and one guy pulled out a pistol and had a shot, that escalated to a carbine and then a small machine gun," says Russell Savory, from the Friends of Stow Maries Aerodrome.

At the same time aerial bombardment was being carried out on the capital by German Zeppelin airships and Gotha fixed-wing bombers.

"The Germans were using both the Thames and the Crouch or Blackwater as navigation aids, they would fly to the end of the river and keep going to bomb London - we had no defence," adds Mr Savory.

The British government decided to use aircraft to protect the city and began selecting high, flat sites in rural areas that would be suitable for airfields.

The Royal Flying Corps 37 Squadron had three "flights" which were dispatched to different locations around the south of England including Stow Maries.

Dangerous job

The first commanding officer of Stow Maries Aerodrome was Lieutenant Claude Ridley, who Mr Savory says was an exceptional pilot who specialised in dropping agents behind enemy lines.

"On one flight he landed in a field which had been safe but a German airfield had been created in the next field. His aircraft wouldn't start, the Germans heard them, arrested them and sent them off for interrogation.

"They fought with the guards and escaped and made their way to the neutral border with Holland where they were given temporary travel documents.

"When he got back to Britain he was granted an audience with the King but because of his great value the government couldn't risk him flying again into enemy territory and getting captured so he was given command of Stow Marie at the age of 19 years and 11 months."

At its peak 400 people were based at Stow Maries, including 30 women who worked in the offices or as cooks and cleaners.

The squadron was successful in a number of missions including downing a Zeppelin and hitting Gotha bombers heading for London.

Being a pilot was a dangerous job and in many cases it was not enemy fire that brought aircraft down.

"It was the beginning of flight and the aircraft were doing their best to kill them in the first place - they were so dangerous," Mr Savory says.

The airfield continued to expand as the war went on, with completion of the aerodrome scheduled for December 1918.

But the war ended in November of that year and some of the buildings were never finished.

After the war the various buildings were either left empty or used for agricultural storage until the site faced being sold off in lots for development.
'Sacrifice and losses'

To save it Maldon District Council put an emergency preservation order on the airfield and began to look for someone to take the restoration project on.

Two businessmen, Mr Savory and Steve Wilson, put a bid in for Stow Maries and began restoring the buildings in 2009 with the help of 50 volunteers.

One of those volunteers is Mike Hall, a retired businessman who worked in the security industry.

He lives two miles from the airfield and decided to volunteer after visiting the site for a tour of the buildings three years ago.

"Walking around the site and looking at the buildings - the atmosphere just grabbed me," he says.

He has helped with a range of restoration projects including demolishing walls that were added after WWI and installing electrics.

The volunteers are "a really friendly group who roll their sleeves up and get involved."

"There are ex-plumbers and electricians and people with a range of skills they can use on the site," he adds.

In total Mr Savory and Mr Wilson spent £2.3m of their own money on the restoration and on creating a museum with the aim of educating people about the role of aircraft in WWI.

Nine of the original buildings have now been restored and working WWI aircraft have even returned to the field but the restoration is years from being complete with work currently taking place to turn the project into a charitable trust.

Mr Savory believes the site has an important role to play in the history of Britain.

"We hope to fill a gap in the architectural history of the nation.

"It's an important part of social history too - so we want to engage with the younger generation and help them understand the sacrifice and losses these pilots made," he said.
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
Julius Caesar(100 VC - 44 VC)
http://nl.escertico.wikia.com/wiki/Militaria_Wiki
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Jan 2013 18:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Enkele Wereldoorlog I foto's:



37 (Home Defence) Squadron



Lt Hollington by his Sopwith Camel



Inside of one of the hangars.



SE-5 engine work in progress at Stow Maries.



Sopwith Camel ' Comic'. Introduced as an experiment in night fighting, this Camel had it cockpit moved to the rear of the normal position and its Vickers guns removed from their normal position, being replaced by two Lewis guns on the top wing. It was hoped that this would reduce the flash from the firing guns in front of the pilot and effecting his night vision. This photograph is taken at Stow Maries in 1918.
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
Julius Caesar(100 VC - 44 VC)
http://nl.escertico.wikia.com/wiki/Militaria_Wiki
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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2013 19:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Tandorini @ 11 Mei 2012 16:34 schreef:
A World War I airbase in Essex has been granted listed status.
Twenty-four buildings at Stow Maries Aerodrome, near Maldon, have been Grade II star-listed by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
The airfield site, which was used as a base for the 37th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, is one of the few remaining of its kind in the country.
It was listed for its "rarity" and "historical importance", Heritage Minister John Penrose said.
The aerodrome was created in 1914 by the forerunner to the Royal Air Force.
It was one of several in the south east of England used to defend London from German Zeppelin airship and bomber raids during the conflict.
'Remarkable preservation'
It ceased being used by the military in 1919 and was returned to agricultural use.
Its buildings remained and, according to English Heritage, is now "the largest known surviving group of Royal Flying Corps buildings on a WWI aerodrome".
In recent years the aerodrome was bought by private owners, who have had the buildings restored, and created a museum to tell its role during the war.
In 2010, a war memorial commemorating the 10 pilots of 37 Squadron killed in action during WWI was erected on the former parade ground.
Among the 24 surviving buildings are the officers' mess, accommodation huts, ammunition store, workshops, blacksmiths and mortuary.
On granting the listed status, Mr Penrose said the aerodrome was a "poignant reminder of the conditions in which they were working".
"I am listing Stow Maries for its rarity, its architectural interest, its value as a group and also of course for its historical importance as the first line of defence against German air raids," he said.
English Heritage chief executive Simon Thurley said: "The importance of Stow Maries is amplified by the approaching 100th anniversary of the Great War.
"It's in a remarkable state of preservation, full of historic interest and of great educational potential."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-18017960

Zie ook: http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=24149

_________________
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Tell them, because our fathers lied
-Rudyard Kipling-

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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2013 19:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Yvonne @ 16 Okt 2013 16:09 schreef:
Last surviving First World War aerodrome saved for nation

Today, thanks to a £1.5million grant from NHMF, Stow Maries Great War Aerodrome Trust has secured Europe’s only remaining unaltered First World War Aerodrome - Stow Maries in Purleigh near Maldon, Essex.

Alongside the grant from National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF), additional support was also obtained from Essex County Council, Maldon District Council and English Heritage.

Quote:
Stow Maries is a unique survival. Of the 250 aerodromes built during the First World War, just ten still exist of which Stow Maries is the only one to have remained almost untouched since the war ended in 1918. There are over 24 original Grade II* listed Royal Flying Corp operation buildings remaining including the original officers’ mess; other ranks’ mess; pilots’ ready room; blacksmith’s; ambulance station and morgue; motor transport sheds; and the aircraft workshop/ radio room.

Dame Jenny Abramsky, Chair of NHMF, said: "Stow Maries gives us fresh insight into the pivotal new role that aviation played in the First World War. The National Heritage Memorial Fund was set up as a memorial to those that gave their lives for this country and so with the Centenary starting next year, our Trustees felt Stow Maries had to be secured now for future generations."

Stow Maries was built in 1916 as a direct response to increased attacks by German Zeppelin airships and later Gotha fixed-wings bombers on British mainland. An integral part of the UK’s Home Front defence, it was home to the newly formed 37 Squadron, Royal Flying Corp led by the then, 19 year-old Captain Ridley. A corps of elite pilots, their story is less well known that that of the Spitfire pilots of the Second World War however they played a vital role in protecting the Capital and surrounding towns in what became known as the First Battle of Britain in 1917.

Key events at Stow Maries included:

The last Zeppelin shot down during the war was by the 37 Squadron in June 1917
The first mid-air collision of the war was recorded at Stow Maries in 1917
In 1918, Stow Maries was the first British airfield to accept American squadrons following the USA entering the war


The purchase of the site not only secures the long-term future of the aerodrome as it currently exists, but also paves the way towards the phased on-going restoration of Stow Maries back to its former glory with permanent hangars and original First World War aircraft on display. An essential part of the project will focus on the start-up of an apprenticeship scheme to keep the heritage aviation skills alive.

Jeremy Lucas, Stow Maries Trust Chairman said: "The next five years will see a sustained commemoration at Stow Maries of the extraordinary human exploits and stories. This was the first war that was fought here at home through air-raids. By opening up this site, the public and particularly young people will gain a greater understanding of how as a nation we overcame it.”

Essex County Councillor John Jowers, Cabinet Member for Libraries, Communities & Planning said: “The Stow Maries First World War aerodrome is a real treasure for Essex and I am delighted that the County Council could assist the trust to secure the heritage of the site.”

Leader of Maldon District Council, Councillor Bob Boyce said: “Maldon District Council’s foresight at saving Stow Maries will ensure it remains a unique and important piece of our national history I am extremely pleased therefore that the trust which has been created will ensure that this site is preserved for future generations to enjoy and I hope it will become a premier visitor attraction for the District and the Country as a whole.”

John Ette, Heritage at Risk Principal for English Heritage in the East of England said: “Despite active and on-going conservation work, recognised by an English Heritage Angel Award last year, Stow Maries was at risk of being sold for redevelopment. We are pleased to have contributed our expertise as well as £50,000 grant towards the purchase of this nationally important site.”

For further information about the heritage site please visit Friends Of Stow Maries Aerodrome website.


http://www.nhmf.org.uk/LatestNews/Pages/StowMariesAerodrome.aspx

_________________
If any question why we died
Tell them, because our fathers lied
-Rudyard Kipling-

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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2013 19:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

TYPHOON @ 19 Okt 2013 9:36 schreef:
Saved: Old WWI aerodrome that was previous base for Royal Flying Corps

Blogger: GemSen

During World War I, Stow Maries, in Essex, was an airbase for the fledgling Royal Flying Corps — built in response to increased attacks by German Zepplin airships and Gotha fixed wing bombers.

Astonishingly, out of 250 aerodromes built during WWI, Stow Maries, which closed in 1919, is one of ten that still exist and is the only one to have been kept in near-perfect condition.

It had to be saved.

And thankfully it will be —due to a £1.5 million National Heritage Memorial Fund grant and a campaign by a group of volunteers who rediscovered the closed airfield in 2009.

Since its closure, the aerodrome became overgrown and forgotten about until a group of enthusiasts rediscovered it and began a campaign to save it. There was a risk that the Grade II listed building could have been sold for redevelopment.

There are more than 24 original Grade II listed Royal Flying Corps operation buildings remaining, including the original officers’ mess, other ranks’ mess, blacksmith’s, ambulance station and morgue.

The Royal Flying Corps

The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was created in May 1912 and was the air arm of the British Army during the First World War, until it merged with the Royal Naval Air Service on 1 April 1918 to form the Royal Air Force.

The Royal Flying Corps helped direct artillery gunfire, take photographs for intelligence analysis — becoming the essential eyes of the British Army. This gradually led RFC pilots into aerial battles and dogfights with German pilots and later in the war included the strafing of enemy infantry and emplacements, the bombing of German military airfields and later the strategic bombing of German industrial and transportation facilities.

The RFC was also responsible for the observation balloons on the Western front. For the first half of the war, as with the land armies deployed, the French air force vastly outnumbered the RFC, and did more of the fighting. Despite the primitive aircraft, aggressive leadership by RFC commander Hugh Trenchard and the adoption of a continually offensive stance operationally in efforts to pin the enemy back led to many brave fighting exploits and high casualties.

There were over 700 casualties in 1916 — and the the rate got worse until the RFC’s lowest point in April 1917 ; dubbed ‘Bloody April’.

By the end of the war the casualties from the RFC/RNAS/RAF for 1914–18 totalled 9,378 killed or missing, with 7,245 wounded. Some 900,000 flying hours on operations were logged, and 6,942 tons of bombs dropped. The RFC claimed some 7,054 German aircraft and balloons either destroyed, sent ‘down out of control’ or ‘driven down’. Despite the casualties, it did however provide the Army General Staff with vital and up-to-date intelligence on German positions and numbers through continual photographic and observational reconnaissance though the entire war.

Eleven RFC members received the Victoria Cross during the First World War. At first the RFC did not believe in publicising the victory totals and exploits of their Aces, but eventually public interest and the newspapers’ demand for heroes lead to this policy being abandoned. Feats of aces such as Captain Albert Ball helped raise morale in the service as well as on the ‘home front’.

On 17 August 1917, South African General Jan Smuts presented a report to the War Council on the future of air power and recommended a new air service be formed that would be on a level with the Army and Royal Navy. The formation of the new service would, moreover, make the under-utilised men and machines of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). On 1 April 1918, the RFC and the RNAS were combined to form a new service, the Royal Air Force (RAF). By the start of 1919 the RAF had 4,000 combat aircraft and 114,000 personnel in some 150 squadrons.

For a short time after the formation of the RAF, pre-RAF ranks such as Lieutenant, Captain and Major continued to exist, a practice which officially ended on 15 September 1919. For this reason and something to bear in mind if you are doing some genealogy research is that some early RAF memorials and gravestones show ranks which no longer exist in the modern RAF.

Restoring the old airfield

Built in 1916, Stow Maries was a base for the new 37 squadron, Royal Flying Corps and their early biplanes — helping to defend London from German bombing raids. The plan is to now to restore many of the buildings to their wartime condition, and to open a museum commemorating the men who flew here. It will also apparently host workshops, teaching the old skills of aircraft construction.

“There’s much spoken about the land warfare and how terrible that was… but there’s not so much known about the aviators who were writing the books on how to fly for when WWII came along,” Russell Savory, from the Friends of Stow Maries Aerodrome, told the BBC.

Mr Savory’s ambition is for the museum to be one that “smells and works and is not just a display.”

The chairman of the trust, Jeremy Lucas, said he hoped the next five years would see “a sustained commemoration” of “extraordinary human exploits and stories”.

He said: “By opening up this site, the public and particularly young people will gain a greater understanding of how as a nation we overcame it.”

The site was bought from a private vendor with backing from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, Essex County Council, Maldon District Council and English Heritage.

“Such a sacrifice was paid by those guys and I think it’s my duty with this little aerodrome to keep that recorded,” Mr Savory added.

http://blog.forces-war-records.co.uk/2013/10/17/saved-old-wwi-aerodrome-that-was-previous-base-for-royal-flying-corps/

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Tell them, because our fathers lied
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shabu
Cheffin


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BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2013 19:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

silentknight @ 21 Okt 2013 9:22 schreef:
In de omgeving van Essex, niet zo heel ver van Londen zijn enkele ferventen reeds enkele jaren bezig met de restanten van de thuisbasis van de 37 squadron te renoveren.

Doordat na de oorlog de restanten onaangeroerd bleven, mede dankzij het behoud van de eigendommen bij dezelfde familie, is deze site uniek en authentiek bewaard gebleven.

Werkelijk alles wordt zo authentiek mogelijk gerenoveerd.

Meer info op:

http://www.stowmaries.com/index.asp

Bovenstaande site is opgestart in 2009, maar is in 2013 vervangen door onderstaande site.

http://www.fosma.co.uk/images/banner.jpg

Ook in 2014 worden er speciale samenkomsten georganiseerd.

_________________
If any question why we died
Tell them, because our fathers lied
-Rudyard Kipling-

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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Mrt 2016 16:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ze hebben een nieuwe website:

http://www.stowmaries.org.uk/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 02 Mrt 2017 12:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history/first-world-war-aerodrome/?utm_source=English+Heritage&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8009394_Members%27+E-news+and+Events+23+Feb+2017&utm_content=StonehengeAerodromeSWNF
_________________
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"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
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http://tandorini.wordpress.com/
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