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9 augustus

 
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Hauptmann



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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2006 20:19    Onderwerp: 9 augustus Reageer met quote

1914 Walter Rathenau of AEG takes charge of German war production

On August 9, 1914, barely one week after the outbreak of the First World War, German Minister of War Erich von Falkenhayn puts Walter Rathenau of the large electronics firm Allgemeine-Elektrizitats-Gellellschaft (AEG) in charge of organizing all the raw materials for Germany’s war production.

The issue of how to effectively collect and utilize raw materials for the production of munitions and other war supplies was especially important for Germany, who was prevented from importing anything by the Allied naval blockade in the North Sea, in place from the beginning of the war. Rathenau, the son of AEG’s founder, had approached the German War Department proposing to “save Germany from strangulation” with an idea of centralizing the management of the war production process under a single organization, a raw materials agency. In Rathenau’s vision, the agency would take inventory of the raw materials available—not only in Germany but in all German-occupied territories, such as Belgium—and allocate them to the firms that could use them best. Each commodity used in war production would have its own raw materials company, with a board of directors drawn from the firms that used the given commodity.

In this way, Rathenau convinced Falkenhayn, he would combine the best aspects of the capitalist free-market system would be united with the principles of collective management to enable a smooth, optimally effective war production process. Falkenhayn was convinced, and made Rathenau the head of what became the KRA, the German war production organization. Appointing Rathenau—who was Jewish—to head war production was an extraordinary step for a Prussian military officer to take at the time.

In the end, however, Rathenau served in the new post only briefly, as many of the businesses the KRA administered bristled under an organization directed by a Jew. In April 1915, Rathenau was forced to resign; he subsequently returned to his post at AEG, becoming chairman of the company upon his father’s death in June 1915. Rathenau remained active in politics, and worked to support the creation of the Third Supreme Command, an effective military dictatorship under Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff, in August 1916. He opposed some of the Command’s decisions, however, including the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare in 1917 and Ludendorff’s desire to annex territory on the Eastern Front. After the war, Rathenau joined the Democratic Party; he served as minister for reconstruction from 1919 to 1921 and became foreign minister in 1922. In June of that year, shortly after signing the controversial Treaty of Rapallo with the Soviet Union—which reestablished diplomatic relations between the two countries—Rathenau was murdered in Berlin by right-wing anti-Semitic extremists.

http://www.historychannel.com/
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Hauptmann



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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2006 20:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 9. August

1914
Neue Erfolge an der Ostgrenze
Erfolge unserer Verbündeten gegen Rußland
Eine Ansprache des Zaren
Montenegros Kriegserklärung
Eine montenegrinische Aktion
Beschießung von Antivari
Aufruf des österreichischen Ober-Kommandos an die Polen Rußlands
Die Bekanntgabe unserer Verluste
Englische Truppen in Togo

1915
Praga gegenüber Warschau besetzt
Einschließung von Nowo-Georgiewsk
Die Straße Warschau-Lublin überschritten
Feindliches U-Boot vor Bulair vernichtet

1916
Starke feindliche Angriffe im Westen und Osten abgeschlagen
Das Ergebnis der Luftkämpfe im Juli
Neuer Luftschiffangriff auf Englands Ostküste
Vergebliche russische Massenangriffe in Wolhynien
Die Italiener in Görz

1917
Russisch-rumänische Angriffe bei Focsani gescheitert

1918
Frontlinie Morcourt - Harbonnières - Contontoire
Die Folge der englisch-französischen Offensive vom 8. August

http://www.stahlgewitter.com/#chronik
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Deutsche Tageszeitung - Berlin - Sonntag 9 August 1914 - Morgen Ausgabe

http://www.archive.org/details/DeutscheTageszeitung-Berlin-Sonntag9August1914-MorgenAusgabePage1
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

On This Day - 9 August 1914

Western Front
Belgium: French cavalry in Belgium.

Eastern Front
East Prussia: Russian First Army advancing.

Naval and Overseas Operations
H.M.S. "Birmingham", cruiser, sinks German submarine U15.

Political, etc.
Germany, by means of Holland, offers terms of peace to Belgium; they are rejected.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/onthisday/1914_08_09.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Karikatur „Der Stänker“ aus dem Kladderadatsch vom 9. August 1914

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kladderadatsch_1914_Der_St%C3%A4nker.png
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

HMS Birmingham

The British 5,400 ton light cruiser HMS Birmingham was responsible for sinking the first German submarine of the First World War. Commanded by Captain Arthur Duff HMS Birmingham - of 'Chatham' class - knocked out both the periscope and conning tower of German U-15 on 9 August 1914 with a salvo of six shots from the light cruiser's guns east of the Orkneys while the submarine was attempting to move in for an attack.

Having done so Duff issued instructions that the cruiser be directed at the U-boat at full speed.

Turning HMS Birmingham's helm the cruiser was brought around in order that her bows faced the crippled submarine.

Thus Duff rammed the German submarine at 25 mph (40 kph), which quickly rolled over and sank, killing its crew of 23.

Afbeeldingen op http://www.the-weatherings.co.uk/pccship0165.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

9 August 1915: Kitchener's & Hamilton's Reports on Gallipoli

Concerning Gallipoli: Lord Kitchener's Official Report as Minister of War, 9 August 1915:

On the Gallipoli Peninsula during the operations in June several Turkish trenches were captured. Our own lines we re appreciably advanced and our positions were consolidated.

Considerable re-enforcements having arrived, a surprise landing on a large scale at Suvla Bay was successfully accomplished on the 6th of August without any serious opposition.

At the same time an attack was launched by the Australian and New Zealand corps from the Anzac position. and a strong offensive was delivered from Cape Helles in the direction of Krithia. In this latter action French troops played a prominent part and showed to high advantage their usual gallantry and fine fighting qualities.

The attack from Anzac, after a series of hotly contested actions, was carried to the summit of Sari Bair and Chunuk Bair, dominating positions in this area. The arrival of transports and the disembarkation of troops in Suvla Bay were designed to enable troops to support this attack. Unfortunately, however, the advance from Suvla Bay was not developed quickly enough, and the movement forward was brought to a standstill after an advance of about two and one-half miles.

The result was that the troops from Anzac were unable to retain their position on the crest of the hills, and after being repeatedly counter-attacked they were ordered to withdraw to positions lower down. These positions were effectively consolidated, and, joining with the line occupied by the Suvla Bay force, formed a connected front of more than twelve miles.

From the latter position a further attack on the Turkish entrenchments was delivered on the 21st, but after several hours of sharp fighting it was not found possible to gain the summit of the hills occupied by the enemy, and the intervening space being unsuitable for defense, the troops were withdrawn to their original position.

In the course of these operations the gallantry and resourcefulness of the Australian and New Zealand troops, frequently formed the subject of eulogy in General Hamilton's reports.

It is not easy to appreciate at their full value the enormous difficulties which attended the operations in the Dardanelles or the fine temper with which our troops met them.

There is not abundant evidence of a process of demoralization having get in among the German led, or rather German-driven Turks, due no doubt, to their extremely heavy losses and to the progressive failure of their resources.

It is only fair to acknowledge that, judged from a humane point of view, the methods of warfare pursued by the Turks are vastly superior to those which have disgraced their German masters.

Throughout, the cooperation of the fleet was intensely valuable, and the concerted action between the sister services was in every way in the highest degree satisfactory.

Field report of General Sir Ian Hamilton:

The first step in the real push -- the step which above all others was to count -- was the night attack on the summits of the Sari Bair ridge. The crest line of this lofty mountain range runs parallel to the sea, dominating the under features contained within the Anzac position, although these fortunately defilade the actual landing-place. From the main ridge a series of spurs run down towards the level beach, and are separated from one another by deep, jagged gullies choked up with dense jungle.... It was our object to effect a lodgment along the crest of the high main ridge with two columns of troops, but, seeing the nature of the ground and the dispositions of the enemy, the effort had to be made by stages. We were bound, in fact, to undertake a double subsidiary operation before we could hope to launch these attacks with any real prospect of success. . . .

The two assaulting columns, which were to work up three ravines to the storm of the high ridge, were to be preceded by two covering columns.

The whole of this big attack was placed under the command of Major-General Sir A. J. Godley, General Officer Commanding New Zealand and Australian Division.

Among other stratagems the Anzac troops, assisted by H. M. S. Colne, had long and carefully been educating the Turks how they should lose Old No. 3 Post, which could hardly have been rushed by simple force of arms. Every night, exactly at 9 p. m., H.M.S. Colne threw the beams of her searchlight onto the redoubt, and opened fire upon it for exactly ten minutes. Then, after a ten-minute interval, came a second illumination and bombardment, commencing always at 9.20 and ending precisely at 9.30 p. m.

The idea was that, after successive nights of such practice, the enemy would get into the habit of taking the searchlight as a hint to clear out until the shelling was at an end. But on the eventful night of the 6th, the sound of their footsteps drowned by the loud cannonade, unseen as they crept along in that darkest shadow which fringes the searchlight's beam -- came the right covering column. At 9.30 the light switched off and instantly our men poured out of the scrub jungle and into the empty redoubt. By 11 p. m. the whole series of surrounding entrenchments were ours.

Once the capture of Old No. 3 Post was fairly under way, the remainder of the right covering column carried on with their attack upon Bauchop's Hill and the Chailak Dere. By 10 p.m. the northernmost point, with its machine gun, was captured, and by 1 o clock in the morning the whole of Bauchop's Hill, a maze of ridge and ravine, everywhere entrenched was fairly in our hands.

The attack along the Chailak Dere was not so cleanly carried out -- made, indeed, just about as ugly a start as any enemy could wish. Pressing eagerly forward through the night, the little column of stormers found themselves held up by a barbed-wire erection of unexampled height, depth and solidity, which completely closed the river bed -- that is to say, the only practicable entrance to the ravine. The entanglement was flanked by a strongly-held enemy trench running right across the opening of the Chailak Dere. Here that splendid body of men, the Otago Mounted Rifles, lost some of their bravest and their best, but in the end, when things were beginning to seem desperate, a passage was forced through the stubborn obstacle with most conspicuous and cool courage by Captain Shera and a party of New Zealand Engineers, supported by the Maoris, who showed themselves worthy descendants of the warriors of the Gate Pah. Thus was the mouth of the Chailak Dere opened in time to admit of the unopposed entry of the right assaulting column.

Simultaneously the attack on Table Top had been launched under cover of a heavy bombardment from H.M.S. Colne. . . . The scarped heights were scaled, the plateau was carried by midnight. With this brilliant feat the task of the right covering force was at an end. Its attacks had been made with the bayonet and bomb only; magazines were empty by order; hardly a rifle shot had been fired. Some 150 prisoners were captured, as well as many rifles and much equipment, ammunition and stores. No words can do justice to the achievement of Brigadier-General Russell and his men. There are exploits which must be seen to be realized....

The grand attack was now in full swing, but the country gave new sensations in cliff climbing even to officers and men who had graduated over the goat tracks of Anzac. The darkness of the night, the density of the scrub, hands and knees progress up the spurs, sheer physical fatigue, exhaustion of the spirit caused by repeated hairbreadth escapes from the hail of random bullets all these combined to take the edge of the energies of our troops. At last, after advancing some distance up the Aghyl Dere, the column split up into two parts. Dawn broke, and the crest line was not yet in our hands, although, considering all things, the left assaulting column had made a marvelous advance. . . .

At 4.30 a. m. on August 9, the Chunuk Bair ridge and Hill Q were heavily shelled. The naval gun, an the guns on the left flank, and as many as possible from the right flank (whence the enemy's advance could be enfiladed) took part in this cannonade, which rose to its climax at 5.15 a. m., when the whole ridge seemed a mass of flame and smoke, whence huge clouds of dust drifted slowly upwards in strange patterns on to the sky. At 5.16 a. m. this tremendous bombardment was to be switched off on to the flanks and reverse slopes of the heights.

General Baldwin's column had assembled in the Chailak Dere, and was moving up towards General Johnston's headquarters. Our plan contemplated the massing of this column immediately behind the trenches held by the New Zealand Infantry Brigade. Thence it was intended to launch the battalions in successive lines, keeping them as much as possible on the high ground. Infinite trouble had been taken to insure that the narrow track should be kept clear, guides also were provided; but in spite of all precautions the darkness, the rough scrub-covered country, its sheer steepness, so delayed the column that they were unable to take full advantage of the configuration of the ground, and, inclining to the left, did not reach the line of the Farm -- Chunuk Bair -- till 5.15 a. m. In plain English, Baldwin, owing to the darkness and the awful country, lost his way -- through no fault of his own. The mischance was due to the fact that time did not admit of the detailed careful reconnaissance of routes which is so essential where operations are to be carried out by night.

And now, under the fine leader, Major C. G. L. Allanson, the Sixth Gurkhas of the 29th Indian Infantry Brigade pressed up the slopes of Sari Bair, crowned the heights of the col between Chunuk Bair and Hill Q, viewed far beneath them the waters of the Hellespont, viewed the Asiatic shores along which motor transport was bringing supplies to the lighters. Not only did this battalion, as well as some of the Sixth South Lancashire Regiment, reach the crest, but they began to attack down the far side of it, firing as they went at the fast-retreating enemy. But the fortune of war was against us. At this supreme moment Baldwin's column was still a long way from our trenches on the crest of Chunuk Bair, whence they should even now have been sweeping out towards {Chunuk Bair Hill} Q- along the whole ridge of the mountain. And instead of Baldwin's support came suddenly a salvo of heavy shell.

These falling so unexpectedly among the stormers threw them into terrible confusion. The Turkish commander saw his chance. Instantly his troops were rallied and brought back in a counter-charge, and the South Lancashires and Gurkhas, who had seen the promised land, and had seemed for a moment to have held victory in their grasp, were forced backwards over the crest, and on to the lower slopes whence they had first started....

At daybreak on Tuesday, August 10, the Turks delivered a grand attack from the line Chunuk Bair Hill Q against these two battalions, already weakened in numbers, though not in spirit, by previous fighting. First our men were shelled by every enemy gun, and then at 5.30 a.m. were assaulted by a huge column, consisting of no less than a full division plus a regiment of three battalions. The North Lancashire men were simply overwhelmed in their shallow trenches by sheer weight of numbers, while the Wilts, who were caught out in the open, were literally almost annihilated. The ponderous masses of the enemy swept over the crest, turned the right flank of our line below, swarmed round the Hampshires and General Baldwin's column, which had to give ground, and were only extricated with great difficulty and very heavy losses.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Monday 9th August 1915- Diary of HV Rynolds

‘The terrific noise of a bombardment of the enemy positions by our warships and the howitzers and field guns on shore woke me early about 5am when some ver severe fighting took place and continued practically all day, great numbers of wounded came down and we had the greatest difficulty to handle the and when relief came about 1pm we were well done up. The 7th Btn, suffered very heavily during the morning when the enemy counter attack their positions and very heavily combed their trenches but failed to capture any. Very heavy fighting has been in progress during the day on the left flank at Suvla and this afternoon a fire started in the scrub and burned for hours. About 4pm Beachy Bill landed several destructive shells on Dawkins Point where the Indian mule transport column suffered a number of casualties and lost 9 mules. A number of infantry and artillery reinforcements arrived this morning.’

http://www.awm.gov.au/blog/2010/08/09/monday-9th-august-1915-diary-of-hv-rynolds/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Events of the Gallipoli Campaign

9 August 1915
A party of the 6th Gurkha Rifles, led by Major C J L Allanson, take Hill ’Q’ to the north of Chunuk Bair but are forced to retire when they are shelled by their own artillery. A supporting force under Brigadier-General A H Baldwin got held up in the battle confusion in the valleys below Chunuk Bair and ‘Q’ and failed to reach the Gurkhas.

British reconnaissance planes reported significant numbers of Turkish reinforcements massing behind Chunuk Bair.

General Sir Ian Hamilton personally visited Suvla in an attempt to get the stalled British advance moving forward. However, Turkish re-inforcements were now arriving in strength at Suvla and an attack beat the British back from the key position of Teke Tepe.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/100-events-gallipoli-campaign/august-1915.html

Turkey: Dardanelles, Gallipoli, Lone Pine, 9 August 1915

Three unidentified 7th Battalion men standing at a bomb stop at the old Turkish firing line in Lone Pine. Note the pine logs remaining from the original trench headcover constructed by the Turks.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/photos/2008/04/22/2224265.htm

Australia and the Gallipoli Campaign

9 August 1915 - August Offensive

The New Zealanders held on to Chunuk Bair and in the evening they were relieved by British units.

British and Gurkha units failed in an attempt to take ‘Q’.

Corporal Alexander Burton, Captain Frederick Tubb and Corporal William Dunstan, all of the 7th Battalion (Victoria), were all awarded the Victoria Cross for their outstanding courage at Lone Pine. Burton was killed in the action for which he was awarded the VC.

Private John Hamilton, 3rd Battalion (New South Wales), of Penshurst, New South Wales, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his outstanding bravery at Lone Pine.

Captain Alfred Shout, 1st Battalion (New South Wales), of Darlington, Sydney, New South Wales, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his outstanding bravery at Lone Pine. Shout was killed in the action for which he was awarded the VC.

Within three days of fighting at the defence of Lone Pine 7 VCs had been awarded to Australian soldiers.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/australia-gallipoli-campaign/august-1915.html
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 09 Aug 2010 4:53, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Burton VC - Dunstan VC - Tubb VC : 3 VCs in one action

In a single action at Lone Pine, Gallipoli 3 men working side by side were all awarded the Victoria Cross. This stands as the most VCs ever awarded for a single action involving Australians.

Frederick Harold TUBB VC
Rank: Lieutenant
Unit: 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division
Date: 9 August 1915
Place: Lone Pine, Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey

CITATION: For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty at Lone Pine Trenches, Gallipoli Peninsula, on 9th August 1915. In the early morning the enemy made a determined counter-attack on the centre of the newly captured trench held by Lieutenant Tubb. They advanced up a sap and blew in a sandbag barricade, leaving only one foot of it standing, but Lieutenant Tubb led his men back, repulsed- the enemy and rebuilt the barricade. Supported by strong bombing parties the enemy succeeded in twice again blowing in the barricades, but on each occasion Lieutenant Tubb, although wounded in the head and arm, held his ground with the greatest coolness and rebuilt it, and finally succeeded in maintaining his position under very heavy bomb fire. (London Gazette: 15th October 1915.)

Alexander Stewart BURTON VC
Rank: Corporal
Unit: 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division
Date: 9 August 1915
Place: Lone Pine, Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey

CITATION: For most conspicuous bravery at Lone Pine Trenches, on the 9th August 1915. In the early morning the enemy made a determined counter-attack on the centre of the newly captured trench held by Lieutenant Tubb, Corporals Burton, Dunstan and a few men. They advanced up a sap and blew in a sandbag barricade, leaving only one foot of it standing, but Lieutenant Tubb, with the two Corporals, repulsed the enemy and rebuilt the barricade. Supported by strong bombing parties, the enemy twice again succeeded in blowing in the barricade, but on each occasion thee were repulsed and the barricade rebuilt, although Lieutenant Tubb was wounded in the head and arm and Corporal Burton was killed by a bomb whilst most gallantly building up the parapet under a hail of bombs. (London Gazette: 15th October 1915)

William DUNSTAN VC
Rank: Corporal
Unit: 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division
Date: 9 August 1915
Place: Lone Pine, Gallipoli Peninsula, Turkey

CITATION: For most conspicuous bravery at Lone Pine Trenches, on the 9th August, 1915. In the early morning the enemy made a determined counter-attack on the centre of the newly captured trench held by Lieutenant Tubb, Corporals Burton, Dunstan and a few men. They advanced up a sap and blew in a sandbag barricade, leaving only one foot of it standing, but Lieutenant Tubb, with the two Corporals, repulsed the enemy and rebuilt the barricade. Supported by strong bombing parties, the enemy twice again succeeded in blowing in the barricade, but on each occasion thee were repulsed and the barricade rebuilt, although Lieutenant Tubb was wounded in the head and arm and Corporal Burton was killed by a bomb whilst most gallantly building up the parapet under a hail of bombs. (London Gazette: 15th October 1915)

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-medals/most-awarded.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Pembroke County War Memorial - Nevern War Memorial

Thomas Griffiths, Private, 2174, Welsh Regiment. Tom was born at Boncath, and enlisted at Cardigan into the 1/4th Battalion, Welsh Regiment. The battalion was the local Territorial unit, and was attached to 159 Brigade, 53rd (Welsh) Division. The Division moved to the Mediterranean in July 1915, and arrived at Mudros on 5 August 1915, and from here they moved to Gallipoli, landing on 9 August. Here the Division was immediately thrown into action, and spent the next few days in isolated pockets, fighting against a Turkish counter-attack during the Battle of Sari Bair. Tom was killed here on 10 August 1915. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.

http://www.pembrokeshire-war-memorial.co.uk/page47.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 4:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Battle of Bir el Abd 9 August 1916

In the final phase of the battle to defend the Suez Canal fought by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) in the summer of 1916, Major General Chauvel used the mounted troops to attack the Turks at Bir el Abd on 9 August. His plan was to pin them with a frontal attack while encircling both flanks to cut off their retreat and destroy them in place. Brigadier General Chaytor’s New Zealand Mounted Rifles (NZMR) Brigade was allocated the frontal attack. ‘Royston’s Column’, comprising the 1st and 2nd Australian Light Horse brigades (and the attached Wellington Mounted Rifles Regiment), was to attack around the northern flank of the enemy position and the 3rd ALH Brigade was to try to get around the enemy’s southern flank. Chauvel could only put about 3,000 rifles into the attack. He had a few horse artillery batteries and no infantry support.
In the early morning the New Zealanders quickly drove in the enemy outposts in front of Bir el Abd and reached the high ground overlooking the main enemy position. The men dismounted, sent the horses back under cover, and advanced on foot. The northern and southern flank attacks were stopped in the morning, forcing Chauvel to change his plan to a simple frontal assault. Sensing the weakness of their attackers, the Turks launched a series of fierce counter-attacks during the day. In the heaviest assault, three enemy infantry battalions were launched at the centre of the New Zealand line. They were beaten off with difficulty by the Canterbury and Auckland Mounted Rifles regiments, supported by the brigade’s machine guns. At Bir el Abd the artillery battle was won easily by the Turks. The horses of the British gun batteries were a prime target, and 37 artillery horses were killed during the day.
The brigades to the north and south were forced to give ground during the afternoon, leaving the New Zealanders dangerously exposed in the centre. The enemy artillery fire increased in intensity, reaching a level exceeding that experienced at Romani or on Gallipoli, and the counter-attacks continued to come. At 5.30 p.m. Chauvel decided to withdraw. The withdrawal was carried out troop by troop, and squadron by squadron, and the men were clear by 7.30 p.m.
Never in that long hot day did the Turks close to bayonet-fighting range. The battle was fought in extreme heat (38 degrees Celsius according to one report), in loose, deep sand. The men had only a single water bottle to sustain them through the day, and the sun heated the water to near boiling point. Chauvel’s casualties at Bir el Abd were heavy: 73 men were killed (thirty New Zealanders) and 243 were wounded (77 New Zealanders). After a few days the Turks abandoned Bir el Abd and withdrew back to El Arish.
The total Allied casualties in August 1916 were 1,130 (202 killed), mostly in the mounted brigades. In the Anzac Mounted Division, 167 men were killed, 616 were wounded and 36 were listed as missing between 28 July and 13 August. The NZMR Brigade lost 46 killed, 181 wounded and ten missing. Most of these men are buried or commemorated in Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) cemeteries in Cairo and Qantara.
The Turkish attack in August 1916 never came close to threatening shipping on the Suez Canal, nor did it prevent any Allied divisions from leaving Egypt for the Western Front. The Turks lost about half of their entire force (1,250 men killed, 3,750 wounded and nearly 4,000 prisoners) between 3 and 9 August 1916.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=57223

Bir el Abd, Sinai, 9 August 1916
Anzac Mounted Division Artillery, AIF, War Diary Account


9 August
Ayrshires joined Royston's Column, moved to Hod Hamada, and got into action there at 0600, dispersing a small force of the enemy. After dealing with a large camel convoy, fire was opened on various bodies of the enemy apparently concentrating for attack.

About 1200 the wagon line came under fire of 4 inch High Explosive shell, 4 men and 37 horses being killed, and 7 men and 7 horses wounded before anything could be done.

During this time an enemy attack from the right began to materialise, and, the ammunition running short, the battery had to withdraw, which it did in good order, and returned to Oghratina, having fires 375 rounds.

At 0630 the Leicester battery reached Khirba and, after watering and feeding, it was moved into action 2 miles west of Bir el Abd.

It remained there during the day, firing effectively on various good targets, including four separate Turkish advances from Bir el Abd.

At 1730 the battery withdrew to a position 1,000 yards further West, to cover the withdrawal of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade and Somerset Battery.

It returned to bivouac at Oghratina about 0100 on 10 August 1916.

There were four men wounded in this battery. It covered 32 miles in and sand and fought a battle, in 27 hours.

The Somersets advanced towards Bir el Abd with the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade. they came into action at 0545, 3,000 yards west of Bir el Abd and fired on parties of enemy in the Hod, and on ridges behind.

They remained in action all day, firing effectively on the same targets as the Leicester Battery. The Somersets returned at 1815 with the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade and bivouacked at Oghratina.

This battery and the Leicesters between them fired 1,200 rounds.

The Inverness Battery came into action near Bir el Abd and remained there all day firing 465 rounds. Bivouacked at Hassaniya.

http://alh-research.tripod.com/Light_Horse/index.blog/1945044/bir-el-abd-sinai-9-august-1916-headquarters-anzac-mounted-division-aif-war-diary-account/
Zie ook http://alh-research.tripod.com/Light_Horse/index.blog?topic_id=1113729
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mouquet Farm

One unit which saw the beginning and the end of the action at Mouquet Farm was the 16th Battalion from Western Australia. They had two periods in the line, the first between 8 and 12 August and the second between 29 and 31 August.

For the Western Australians, 8 August 1916 must have come as something of a shock. It was the first time the battalion had been in action since it had been evacuated from Gallipoli on 18–19 December 1915. They had been one of the original Gallipoli battalions, landing on the evening of 25 April, and during their eight months on the peninsula they had suffered 834 casualties, killed and wounded. Now, in as many days at Mouquet Farm, they were to lose 76 percent of that Gallipoli total – 637 killed, wounded or missing (most likely killed), virtually two thirds of the battalion as estimated by the battalion historian.

At midnight on 9 August the 16th made its first attack on the Western Front out in the countryside below Mouquet Farm. Across no–man’s–land they were guided by flash lights embedded by the scouts in earth with a different coloured light for each company. All battalion objectives were successfully seized including a number of German machine–guns and their crews. Next day, German retaliation was swift, a bombardment such as the 16th had never experienced on Gallipoli descending on the captured positions and on the afternoon of 11 August, a German counter attack began. The 16th beat this off but the ensuing enemy bombardment fell heavily on battalion positions. Through this inferno the behaviour of one man, Private Martin O’Meara, stood out. Lieutenant William Lynas wrote:

Private O’Meara is the most fearless and gallant soldier I have ever seen; besides doing the very arduous duties imposed on him, by reason of his being in the Scouting Section, efficiently and cheerfully, this man used to fill in his time bringing in the wounded under all conditions
(Recommendation for Victoria Cross, Private Martin O’Meara)

http://www.ww1westernfront.gov.au/mouquet-farm/16th-battalion.html
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Battle of Doiran (1916)

In the beginning of August 1916 three French and one British divisions with 45,000 men and 400 guns launched an offensive against the Bulgarian positions at Lake Dojran, defended by the Second Thracian Infantry Division. The attack began on 9 August with heavy artillery fire on the positions of the 27th Chepino Regiment and 9th Plovdiv Regiment. All four attacks that followed - on 10, 15, 16 and 18 August were repulsed by the Second division and the Allies were forced to retreat to their original positions with heavy casualties.

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Battle_of_Doiran_(1916)
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This Month In Australian Military History

8-9 August 1915 Lieutenant W.J. Symons, VC Lieutenant W.J. Symons, 7th Battalion, originally from Bendigo, Victoria, wins the Victoria Cross at Lone Pine, Gallipoli.

9 August 1915 Corporal A.S. Burton, VC Corporal A.S. Burton, 7th Battalion, originally from Kyneton, Victoria, wins the Victoria Cross at Lone Pine, Gallipoli.

9 August 1915 Corporal W. Dunstan, VC Corporal W. Dunstan, 7th Battalion, originally from Ballarat, Victoria, wins the Victoria Cross at Lone Pine, Gallipoli.

9 August 1915 Private J. Hamilton, VC Private J. Hamilton, 3rd Battalion, originally from Orange, New South Wales, wins the Victoria Cross at Lone Pine, Gallipoli.

9 August 1915 Captain A.J. Shout, VC Captain A.J. Shout, 1st Battalion, originally from New Zealand, wins the Victoria Cross at Lone Pine, Gallipoli. It was a posthumous award.

9 August 1915 Captain F.H. Tubb, VC Captain F.H. Tubb, 7th Battalion, originally from Longwood, Victoria, wins the Victoria Cross at Lone Pine, Gallipoli.

9 August 1918 Private R.M. Beatham, VC Private R.M. Beatham, 8th Battalion, originally from Cumberland, United Kingdom, wins the Victoria Cross at Rosières, east of Amiens. It was a posthumous award.

9–12 August 1916 Private M. O'Meara, VC Private M. O'Meara, 16th Battalion, originally from County Tipperary, Ireland, wins the Victoria Cross at Pozieres.

http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/thismonth/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

US Army Deaths Reported on 9 August 1918

Rank Soldier - Kin - Emergency Address - Cause of Death
Major Adolph M. Trier Mrs A. M. Trier Fond du Lac, WI KIA
Captain Robert M. Graham W. A. Graham Minneola, MO KIA
Ltn Howard O. Arnold O. M. Arnold Elberon, NJ KIA
Ltn W. M. Brigham Jr. W. M. Brigham Marlboro, MA KIA
Ltn P. G. Cox H. J. Cox Weather Bureau, Chicago, IL KIA
Ltn Edwin A. Daly Mrs. G. T. Daly Boston, MA KIA
Ltn P. J. Dowling J. J. Dowling 170 W 98th St., NY KIA
Ltn E. E. Raynor R. W. Raynor Battle Creek, MI KIA
Ltn Gerald R. Stott G. J. Stott Oakland, ME KIA
Ltn John B. White Mrs. J. B. White Hutchinson, KS KIA
Ltn Guy J. Winstead C. M. Winstead Roxboro, NC KIA
Ltn Joseph W. Welch S. K. Welch Hayes, MD KIA
Sgt Percy Alexander B. D. Alexander Forest, LA KIA
Sgt F. Doughney J. J. Doughney 884 E 165th St., NY KIA
Sgt Thomas Z. Evanik K. A. Evanik Youngstown, OH KIA
Sgt Frank N. Jessee Thomas Jessee Danville, KY KIA
Sgt D. S. Johnston J. P. Johnston Hartford, CT KIA
Sgt Frank Koenig John Bruckner Allentown, PA KIA
Sgt F. J. McKernan J. McKernan New Kensington, PA KIA
Sgt L. McNamara Mrs C. McNamara Chicopee Falls, MA KIA
Sgt Shelby Smith W. F. Smith Fairbanks, TX KIA
Sgt Curtis A. Stoyer Mrs. C. A. Stoyer Reading, PA KIA
Sgt Marvin F. Scott J. W. Scott Burnet, TX KIA
Sgt A. B. Thacker Mrs L. Hester Charlottesville, VA KIA
Sgt H. L. White R. P. White Bluefield, WV KIA
Cpl T. Brennan Mrs. P. Brennan 858 6th Av., NY KIA
Cpl T. E. Burker Mrs I. Gibson St. Louis, MO KIA
Cpl C. L. Chamblin Mrs M. Van Diver Shelbyville, IN KIA
Cpl J. J. Conroy Mrs Mary Conroy 831 Bryant Av., Bronx KIA
Cpl L. C. Cook W. I. Cook Albion, NE KIA
Cpl W. B. Costlow Alec Costlow Springfield, MO KIA
Cpl William B. Dunn Mrs G. Goskins Paris, TN KIA
Cpl Stanley Elliott Bradley Elliott Elgin, OK KIA
Cpl David Goldsmith H. Goldsmith Springfield, MA KIA
Cpl C. E. Hanley M. Hanley 145 Lincoln Pl., Brooklyn KIA
Cpl V. Hamilton Mrs M. Hamilton Grantsville, WV KIA
Cpl Chester I. Huston W. Huston Joliet, IL KIA
Cpl Joseph A. Kelly F. J. Kelly Bridgeport, CT KIA
Cpl Hugh W. Mellon Mrs H. Mellon Waterbury, CT KIA
Cpl George F. Moore C. E. Moore Lakin, KS KIA
Cpl Allen G. Myers Dr. J. Myers Alton, IN KIA
Cpl A. Nadel Mrs S. Birnbaum 199 3d St., NY KIA
Cpl L. H. Robertson Mrs A. Sorenson Mason City, NE KIA
Cpl R. Staber S. Staber 375 Lafayette St., NY KIA
Cpl J. F. Sullivan Mrs M. T. Sullivan Williamsport, MA KIA
Cpl F. F. Schanning F. Schanning Monongahela, PA KIA
Cpl John P. Smith R. D. Smith Chattanooga, TN KIA
Cpl James L. Stauffer James Stauffer Hepler, KS KIA
Cpl H. C. Slater W. W. Slater St. Albans, WV KIA
Cpl Jackson R. Tardy Mrs K. Tardy Murat, VA KIA
Cpl P. L. Therkelson no kin Kirkwood, NY KIA
Cpl I. J. Wagner Mrs W. Wagner Utica, NY KIA
Cpl Merle J. Wilson A. L. Wilson Butler, PA KIA
Cpl Stanley Zanovitz A. Zanovitz Nanticoke, PA KIA
Bugler H. Nichols G. Bellew Elmira, NY KIA
Mechanic V. M. Ellig Mrs L. Ellig Fort Smith, AR KIA
Mechanic H. J. Tanguay Mrs V. Tanguay Thompsonville, CT KIA
Cook R. Hassewer Mrs J. Hassewer Chicago, IL KIA
Cook G. Newberry Mrs L. Newberry 1060 Cauldwell Av., NY KIA
Pvt C. E. Braswell C Braswell Lloyd, FL KIA
Pvt L. L. Burnett Mrs H. M. Burnett Springville, TN KIA
Pvt Joseph Beam Mrs R. Beam Hazelton, PA KIA
Pvt R. Baldwin W. Baldwin Beryl, WV KIA
Pvt J. C. Ball Mrs I. Ball Elizabeth, NJ KIA
Pvt C. Carletta Mrs G. Carletts Pittston, PA KIA
Pvt P. J. Catherwood H. Catherwood Morrison, IA KIA
Pvt Ora C. Cole C. B. Cole Bucyrus, OH KIA
Pvt T. Copoiccoi J. Copoiccoi Warrenton, WV KIA
Pvt J. Cohan Mrs A. Ginburg Boston, MA KIA
Pvt J. J. Conefry Mrs A. Conefry 346 1st Av., NY KIA
Pvt A. Cotzino Nick Cotzino Ambridge, PA KIA
Pvt P. Coughlin Miss Coughlin 161 Monticello Av., Jersey City KIA
Pvt W. H. Crosier Mrs M. Crosier Edwards, NE KIA
Pvt J. F. Cumberland J. Cumberland Strand, OK KIA
Pvt T. Curry Mrs B. Fagen 226 Henry St., Brooklyn KIA
Pvt Claudie J. Dunn Bill Dunn Amity, AR KIA
Pvt T. Dambrosio A. Dambrosio Hartford, CT KIA
Pvt L. Dimicki Julia Baroska Holyoke, MA KIA
Pvt F. Dwyer Mrs S. Dwyer Buffalo, NY KIA
Pvt H. Eckersley T. Eckersley Middletown, CT KIA
Pvt W. S. Eswein Mrs M. Eswein Pittsburgh, PA KIA
Pvt J. E. Feldman Mrs E. Feldman 647 5th St., NY KIA
Pvt J. L. Finen Bill Niciok Holyoke, MA KIA
Pvt A. W. Fleming J. E. Fleming Williamanset, MA KIA
Pvt Leon F. Geyer Mrs M. Geyer New Hartford, IA KIA
Pvt Pete Gruba Joe Gruba Saltese, MT KIA
Pvt A. Gray James Gray Cadiz, KY KIA
Pvt J. W. Henry J. J. Henry Newburyport, MA KIA
Pvt P. Hackett M. Conifry 300 W 150th St., NY KIA
Pvt H. James Morton Lewis Fairport, NY KIA
Pvt C. E. W. Jacobson H. Jacobson Cromwell, CT KIA
Pvt G. Johnson J. Johnson 486A 17th., Brooklyn KIA
Pvt H. A. Karl Mrs A. Wiady 363 Livonia Av., Brooklyn KIA
Pvt Joseph Kado M. Cubert Parsons, PA KIA
Pvt O. Knight J. H. Knight Macon, GA KIA
Pvt J. Lyons Mrs S. Lyons Larchmont, NY KIA
Pvt M. Lagiora S. Lagiora Stamford, CT KIA
Pvt F. Lapente F. Mancuno Hartford, CT KIA
Pvt B. F. Lewis T. J. Lewis Mercury, TX KIA
Pvt A. R. Moore Mrs A. B. Moore 405 Ralph St., Brooklyn KIA
Pvt Tedor Milewski J. Milewski Detroit, MI KIA
Pvt Lonzoa Miller Mrs A. Miller Sanger, CA KIA
Pvt D. Mincci P. Dimaniro Providence, RI KIA
Pvt J. McCormick Mrs J. McCormick 46 Brooklyn Av., NY KIA
Pvt O. McFarland Mrs O. McFarland Marietta, PA KIA
Pvt V. McGilloway T. McGilloway Plains, PA KIA
Pvt E. Marks Mrs E. Parsons Armor, WV KIA
Pvt C. Miller Mrs A. Miller Canautota, NY KIA
Pvt P. McGee Mrs N. McGee Baltimore, MD KIA
Pvt J. C. McLaughlin Mrs B. McLaughlin Astoria, LI KIA
Pvt F. A. McMaster E. McMaster Gardiner, ME KIA
Pvt F. Mannarini C. Mannarini Rome, Italy KIA
Pvt H. Miller M. Miller 161 Hope Av., Passaic, NJ KIA
Pvt H. B. Millington Miss M. Millington hosp., Ellis Island KIA
Pvt Salvator Missri C. Missri Hartford, CT KIA
Pvt Edward M. Nelson Mrs M. Nelson Chicago, IL KIA
Pvt James H. O'Conner Mrs P. O'Conner Lafayette, IN KIA
Pvt J. C. Pinckney W. M. Pinckney Yomassee, SC KIA
Pvt A. Pankawski W. Pankawski Hartford, CT KIA
Pvt Carmine Perrotta John Tida Hillsville, PA KIA
Pvt L. T. Peterson Mrs I. Peterson 341 41st St., Brooklyn KIA
Pvt Frank Piwowarsky P. Piwowarsky Syracuse, NY KIA
Pvt Arthur G. Pottie Mrs M. Pottie Haverhill, MA KIA
Pvt F. L. Pritchard Mrs D. Pritchard Rouseville, PA KIA
Pvt M. T. Robertson Dr V. A. Robertson 51 8th Av., Brooklyn KIA
Pvt Andrew Skibinski F. Skibinski Zeigler, IL KIA
Pvt Joseph Star Hiney Star Boston, MA KIA
Pvt D. E. Southard Mrs A. Southard Syria, VA KIA
Pvt James F. Settles S. Settles Stumptown, WV KIA
Pvt W. G. Shaver . N. Beckler Cedarville, WV KIA
Pvt S. Siewienick E. Siewienick South Bend, IN KIA
Pvt W. F. Smith I. B. Smith Midland, MI KIA
Pvt James Scott J. Weber 562 W 207th St., NY KIA
Pvt Leon Sebastiano Mrs A. Leone Messina, Italy KIA
Pvt W. E. Simons J. O. Simons Chatham, LA KIA
Pvt Herbert Slater J. Slater Philadelphia, PA KIA
Pvt H. J. Sullivan D. Sullivan Holyoke, MA KIA
Pvt Patrick Sullivan J. Sullivan Brook, ME KIA
Pvt P. D. Tamulevich J. Tamulevich Worcester, MA KIA
Pvt J. A. Treiber Mrs V. Treiber 285 6th Ave., Astoria, LI KIA
Pvt I. L. Usner Henry Usner New Holland, PA KIA
Pvt John Urbon T. Urbon South Barry, MA KIA
Pvt O. G. Vassar Mrs A. E. Vassar University City, ME KIA
Pvt A. J. Vodraska J. Vodraska Blackwolf, KS KIA
Pvt F. Van Bramer J. Van Bramer 508 E 88th St., NY KIA
Pvt G. Walton Mrs H. Walton Cox Mills, WV KIA
Pvt J. H. Warner W. C. Warner Tiffin, OH KIA
Pvt P. Washington Mrs E. Washington Charleston, SC KIA
Pvt H. S. Woodard I. F. Collar Laporte, IN KIA
Pvt G. M. Walker Mrs F. L. Walker Campello, MA KIA
Pvt G. Weinstein Mrs L. Weinstein Fall River, MA KIA
Pvt E. B. Williams Mrs B. Williams Wentzville, MO KIA
Pvt D. A. Williams O. Williams Stateville, NC KIA
Pvt J. H. Wingert L. Winger Chambersburg, PA KIA
Pvt H. H. Wright John Wright Watertown, NY KIA
Pvt K. O. Wood J. O. Wood Cotton Plant, AR KIA
Pvt G. Yannuzzi Mrs A. Orlando Philadelphia, PA KIA
Pvt C. Yasulevch Mrs M. Yasulevch Lyon, PA KIA
Pvt W. Zewark W. Zewark Rumford Falls, ME KIA
Pvt F. Zitaitis B. Narbudas Baltimore, MD KIA
Pvt V. Zuber Mrs . France 156 Devoe St., Brooklyn KIA
Ltn William J. Sense Mrs C. M. Sense Watseka, IL Wounds
Sgt Napoleon Willette J. Willette Rumford, ME Wounds
Wagoner C. J. Powers Mrs M. W. Wilson Buntyn, TN Wounds
Pvt Maurice Bair Mrs W. Bair Boldfield, NV Wounds
Pvt L. Boucher Mrs O. Boucher Kaiser, AR Wounds
Pvt M. W. King W. H. Banks Iva, SC Wounds
Pvt R. Sargent Mrs Sargent Worcester, MA Wounds
Pvt J. W. Scott R. W. Scott Cleveland, OH Wounds
Pvt H. A. Smith S. J. Smith Hardwick, VA Wounds
Pvt Charles Gifford Mrs C. B. West Yerington, NE Accident/other
Sgt E. R. Sykes G. G. Sykes Allentown, PA Disease
Pvt Sciortino F. Sciortino York, PA Disease

http://www.genealogy-quest.com/military/ww1/1918-casualties-Aug-09.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Battle of Amiens (1918)

The advance continued on 9 August, though not with the same spectacular results of the first day. The battle was widened on the north and the south of the initial attack (with the southern part of the battle (involving French forces) called Battle of Montdidier (French: Bataille de Montdidier)).

The infantry had outrun the supporting artillery and the initial force of more than 500 tanks that played a large role in the Allied success was reduced to six tanks fit for battle within four days. The Germans on Chipilly Spur commanded a wide field of fire to the south of the Somme, and their flanking fire held up the left units of the Australian Corps until late on 9 August, when a small Australian party slipped across the river and captured the village of Chipilly itself, together with a renewed attack by III Corps. On the Canadian front, congested roads and communication problems prevented the British 32nd Division being pushed forward rapidly enough to maintain the momentum of the advance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Amiens_(1918)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Jean Degoutte on the Second Battle of the Marne, 9 August 1918

The Second Battle of the Marne - which ran from 15 July to 4 August 1918 - was intended as Germany's final major attempt at breakthrough on the Western Front prior to the arrival of ever-increasing U.S. troops on the battlefield.

In the event the battle proved a significant Allied victory. Once it became clear that the Germans had not only failed in their aim to win the war in the offensive, but had in fact lost ground, a number of German commanders, including Crown Prince Wilhelm, believed the war was lost.

Reproduced below is the official address given by French Sixth Army General Jean Degoutte to French and U.S. troops towards the close of the battle, on 9 August 1918, in which he praised the conduct of American forces.

General Degoutte's Address to French and U.S. Troops, 9 August 1918
Before the great offensive of July 18th, the American troops, forming part of the Sixth French Army, distinguished themselves by clearing the "Brigade de Marine" Woods and the village of Vaux from the enemy and arresting his offensive on the Marne and at Fossoy.

Since then they have taken the most glorious part in the second battle of the Marne, rivalling the French troops in ardour and valour.

During twenty days of constant fighting they have freed numerous French villages and made, across a difficult country, an advance of forty kilometres, which has brought them to the Vesle.

Their glorious marches are marked by names which will shine in future in the military history of the United States: Torcy, Belleau, Plateau d'Etrepilly, Epieds, Le Charmel, l'Ourcq, Seringes-et-Nesles, Sergy, La Vesle, and Fismes.

These young divisions, who saw fire for the first time, have shown themselves worthy of the old war traditions of the regular army. They have had the same burning desire to fight the Boche, the same discipline which sees that the order given by their commander is always executed, whatever the difficulties to be overcome and the sacrifices to be suffered.

The magnificent results obtained are due to the energy and the skill of the commanders; to the bravery of the soldiers.

I am proud to have commanded such troops.

DEGOUTTE,
The Commanding General of the Sixth Army

Source Records of the Great War, Vol. VI, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/marne2_degoutte.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Graf Berchtold an Grafen Szécsen in Paris, 9. August 1914

W i e n , den. 9. August 1914
Chiffr. 8 Uhr · / . M. p. m.

T e l e g r a m m i n c l a r i s

Réponse au télégramme Nr. 164 en clair[1].
Nouvelles sur participation de nos troupes à la guerre franco­allemande sont absolument controuvées. J'ai donné la même réponse à M. Dumaine.

http://wwi.lib.byu.edu/index.php/III,_166._Graf_Berchtold_an_Grafen_Sz%C3%A9csen_in_Paris,_9._August_1914
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Roland "Roly" Grimshaw - Indian Cavalry Officer and Diarist in World War I

Wednesday 5 August 1914 We have declared war on Germany and now must await the issue of the naval part. The Expeditionary Force is to go over. I hardly slept a wink at night and feel really seedy. I must pull myself together otherwise I shall be so ill that, if by chance I get orders, I won't be able to go. I went over my kit so as to put it together quickly the moment I get orders. Stuck in some photos. It seems such a hollow occupation when I might be employed preparing men for the war.

Thursday 6 August 1914 Up to town. The Belgians seem to be holding the Germans. Lunched club. Met Hambro and others. Dined with Black. Quite a cheery evening in spite of all my troubles.

Friday 7 August 1914 To King's Cross to see Simpson. Then to Liverpool Street to meet Black who was due to leave by the P & O mail steamer. A very crowded train. Met Black trying to recover his kit as he had succeeded in transferring to British Cavalry. Lucky fellow' Returned to Lodge feeling more wretched than ever.

Saturday 8 August 1914 Slept better and am pulling myself together. Spent entire morning packing. Apparently the Belgians have given the Germans a nasty check at Liege. That's all it is, as what are 25,000 men to an army like that of Germany?

Sunday 9 August 1914 Felt much better, but my limbs are all shaky simply from worrying about the war and my being ordered to India. How much one's health depends on one's peace of mind'

Monday 10 August 1914 Left at 8.40 for Southampton to join the Dongola. Simson.1 also joined me at Waterloo. The train was very crowded from Waterloo to Southampton. At latter place found all the hotels crammed, but heard I might get into the Polygon, so Simson and I went there and got accommodation in the billiard room. Found that the hotel was the Headquarters of the Expeditionary Force and I met Jack Kellett who was French's camp commandant. Latter took me into the room used as the office. It was crammed with clerks and all seemed busy writing and very serious.

http://www.grimshaworigin.org/WebPages/RolyGrim.htm
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"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:51    Onderwerp: Re: 9 augustus Reageer met quote

Hauptmann @ 09 Aug 2006 21:19 schreef:
1914 Walter Rathenau of AEG takes charge of German war production

Nu via http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/walter-rathenau-of-aeg-takes-charge-of-german-war-production
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Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2010 5:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A nurse's Christmas on the Western Front, 1914
Katherine Luard was one of the first British nurses to be sent to France on the outbreak of the first world war. Arriving in 9 August 1914, she was sent to Nazaire, where she joined a hospital train, treating and ferryng the wounded back to permanent hospitals.

Published in war time, the book contains few of the horror stories which would later emerge from the conflict, and is written in a surprisingly bright and cheery style. Even so, it gives some idea of the difficult conditions under which nurses worked on the Western Front.

The book was first published anonymously.

http://www.mytimemachine.co.uk/warnurse.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2011 5:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

AUGUST 9, 1914

The Belgian Front.
==The main body of the Belgian Army is retreating toward the River Dyle
==American diplomats refuse to forward a German peace feeler to Belgium

The Western Front (general).
==(to Aug.14) The French Army concentrates it forces toward the frontier

The Northwestern Front.
==Joffre urges the 5th Army to advance over the Semoy into the Ardennes - Lanrezac objects

Alsace.
==(to Aug.10) In Alsace, German counterattacks at Cernay threaten Mulhouse [morning]

===> http://cnparm.home.texas.net/Wars/Marne/Marne02.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Aug 2014 14:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Wat gebeurde er op 9 augustus 1914?

Invallers schieten tientallen burgers dood in Sint-Truiden. Duitse verkenners te paard bereiken de Belgische stellingen aan de Gete. Welke feiten halen nog het nieuws?

http://www.standaard.be/cnt/dmf20140730_01197670
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