Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

7 augustus

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2006 7:03    Onderwerp: 7 augustus Reageer met quote

1914 Battle of Mulhouse begins

At five o’clock on the morning of August 7, 1914, French troops launch their first attack of World War I, advancing towards the city of Mulhouse, located near the Swiss border in Alsace, a former French province lost to Germany in the settlement ending the Franco-Prussian War in 1871.

As envisioned by French Commander in Chief Joseph Joffre, the Battle of Mulhouse was intended to anchor the French recapture of Alsace and provide a base for further French operations to the north. Operating according to the Plan 17 strategy—which emphasized offensive warfare above all else as ideally suited to the French temperament and strengths—Joffre sent General Bonneau and his VIIth Corps over the Vosges Mountains, on the frontier between France and Alsace, with bayonets drawn on the morning of August 7. Bonneau’s men captured Altkirch, a town with a population of 4,000 on the way to Mulhouse, in six hours, suffering 100 casualties. The bayonet charge over the crest of the Vosges that morning seemed a symbol of the classic, glorious French spirit and courage, in a war where most of the fighting would be messy, brutal trench warfare.

Finding only suspiciously light German defenses around Mulhouse, Bonneau hesitated after taking Altkirch, wary of stepping into a trap. After an impatient order from French command, however, he moved ahead with the advance. On August 8, French troops entered Mulhouse without firing a shot; the town’s German occupants had already evacuated.

As the French were occupying Mulhouse, German reserve troops were arriving from Strasbourg and deploying around the town, and on the morning of August 9 the Germans mounted a counterattack against nearby Cernay. Though Bonneau’s men fought fiercely throughout the day and overnight to hold their positions, they were overpowered; by the time Joffre had dispatched a reserve division to Mulhouse, the French had begun a slow withdrawal in order to escape being encircled by the Germans. Joffre accused Bonneau of being too tentative and not mounting a sufficiently aggressive offense; he relieved him of the command and replaced him General Paul Marie Pau, who emerged from retirement to command the “Army of Alsace” in its unsuccessful advance on Lorraine later that month.

http://www.historychannel.com
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2006 7:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Die Nachrichten vom 7. August

1914
Grenzgefechte in Österreich-Ungarn
Abbruch der diplomatischen Beziehungen zu Serbien
Kriegserklärung Montenegros
Deutschland und Frankreich
Vom Vormarsch in Belgien
Lüttich genommen
Pour le Mérite für General der Infanterie v. Emmich
Jellicoe Oberstkommandierende der englischen Flotte
Ein englischer Kreuzer gesunken
Die Neutralitätserklärung der Schweiz
Die Mobilisierung Schwedens

1915
Ein Fort von Nowo-Georgiewsk genommen
Die Verluste der italienischen Tauchboot- und Torpedoflotte

1916
Erfolgreiche Kämpfe bei Pozières
Russische Stellungen in den ostgalizischen Karpathen erobert
Erbitterte Kämpfe am Isonzo

1917
Russische Stellungen nördlich Focsani erstürmt

1918
Feindliche Angriffe an der Vesle abgewiesen
Erfolgreicher Luftangriff gegen die englische Ostküste
Die englischen Riesendampfer "Justicia" und "Franconia" versenkt
Foch Marschall von Frankreich

http://www.stahlgewitter.com/#chronik
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2009 5:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

95 jaar geleden:
Die Nachrichten vom 7. August

1914

Grenzgefechte in Österreich-Ungarn
Abbruch der diplomatischen Beziehungen zu Serbien
Kriegserklärung Montenegros
Deutschland und Frankreich
Vom Vormarsch in Belgien
Lüttich genommen
Pour le Mérite für General der Infanterie v. Emmich
Jellicoe Oberstkommandierende der englischen Flotte
Ein englischer Kreuzer gesunken
Die Neutralitätserklärung der Schweiz
Die Mobilisierung Schwedens
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 19:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Recruitment

On the outbreak of war in August 1914, Britain had 247,432 regular troops. About 120,000 of these were in the British Expeditionary Army and the rest were stationed abroad. It was clear that more soldiers would be needed to defeat the German Army.

On 7th August, 1914, Lord Kitchener, the war minister, immediately began a recruiting campaign by calling for men aged between 19 and 30 to join the British Army. At first this was very successful with an average of 33,000 men joining every day. Three weeks later Kitchener raised the recruiting age to 35 and by the middle of September over 500,000 men had volunteered their services.

At the beginning of the war the army had strict specifications about who could become soldiers. Men joining the army had to be at least 5ft 6in tall and a chest measurement of 35 inches. By May 1915 soldiers only had to be 5ft 3in and the age limit was raised to 40. In July the army agreed to the formation of 'Bantam' battalions, composed of men between 5ft and 5ft 3in in height. (...)

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWrecruit.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 19:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Battle of Mulhouse, 7-9 August 1914

The Battle of Mulhouse was a preliminary French offensive in Alsace in the early days of the First World War. Alsace had been French territory until 1871, and it was hoped that the presence of a French army in the area would trigger a general revolt against the Germans. The advance to Mulhouse was also seen as preparation for the larger offensive planned for Lorraine (14 August-7 September 1914).

The advance to Mulhouse was made by General Bonneau’s VII Corps, from its base at Besançon, seventy miles from Mulhouse. Bonneau was not in favour of the attack, and moved slowly. It took two days for him to reach Mulhouse, only fifteen miles over the German border, losing only 100 men during the advance.

On 9 August the Germans, under General Josias von Heeringen, launched a counterattack. Twenty four hours after arriving in Mulhouse, Bonneau ordered a retreat, pulling back towards Belfort, on the direct route between Besançon and Mulhouse. General Joffre was furious with Bonneau’s lack of aggression, and removed him from command of VII Corps.

Rickard, J (16 August 2007), Battle of Mulhouse, 7-9 August 1914 , http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_mulhouse.html
Zie ook http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/mulhouse.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 06 Aug 2010 19:45, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 19:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Austro-Hungarian Squadron, 7 August 1914

The Austro-Hungarian fleet sortied a squadron to support the German ships SMS Goeben (battlecruiser) and SMS Breslau (light cruiser) in case they attempted to make their way up the Adriatic.

1st Battleship Division: Tegetthoff (Vice-Admiral Njegovan), Viribus Unitis, Prinz Eugen

2nd Battleship Division: Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand (Rear-Admiral Willenik), Radetzky, Zrinyi

Cruiser: Sankt Georg

2nd Torpedo Flotilla: Admiral Spaun, Csepel, Csikos, Dinara, Scharfschutze, Velebit, Wildfang, 50E, 51T, 56T, 57T, 58T, 60T, 61T, 65T, 66F, 67F, 74T, 75T, 76T

http://www.gwpda.org/naval/j0400000.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 19:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Togoland

After calling on the German colony to surrender on 6 August 1914, French and British troops invaded unopposed the next day. No military personnel was stationed in the protectorate. The police force consisted of a commander and deputy commander, 10 German sergeants, 1 native sergeant and 660 Togolese policemen deployed throughout the territory. The Entente forces occupied the capital Lome, then advanced on a powerful and new radio station near Kamina (east of Atakpamé). The colony surrendered on 26 August 1914, after the German technicians who had built the radio installation now destroyed the station during the night of 24/25 August.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Togoland
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 19:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

7 August 1914 → Commons Sitting

MR. CHURCHILL AND THE PRESS.


HC Deb 07 August 1914 vol 65 cc2153-6

Mr. BONAR LAW May I ask the First Lord of the Admiralty if he has any news that he can give to the House, and will he at the same time say what the course of business is to be?

The FIRST LORD of the ADMIRALTY (Mr. Churchill) The House will have read with sorrow of the loss of His Majesty's ship "Amphion" yesterday. The day before yesterday the flotilla of destroyers patrolling in the approaches of the Channel, found the German mine-laying ship "Koningen Luise" and sunk her. About fifty members of the crew—which I am informed was probably 120 or 130 in all—were humanely saved by the flotilla. The "Amphion" continued to scout with the flotilla, and on her return journey was blown up by a mine. The greater part of the officers and men were rescued by boats, but as I have already informed the Press, through a communication issued from the Admiralty, nearly 130 persons were killed outright by the explosion, and in addition to that twenty of the prisoners confined in the fore part of the ship. There are no other losses of any kind. There has been no other fighting so far as we are aware.

The indiscriminate use of mines, not in connection with military harbours or strategic positions—the indiscriminate scattering of contact mines about the seas, which may, of course, destroy not merely enemy vessels or warships, but peaceful merchantmen passing under neutral flags and possibly carrying supplies to neutral countries—this use of mines is new in warfare, and it deserves, at any rate, to be considered attentively, not only by us, who are, of course, engaged in the war, and who may naturally be prone to hasty judgment in such matters, but deserving also to be attentively considered by the nations of a civilised world. The Admiralty are not at all alarmed or disconcerted by such an incident. We have expected a certain number, and we continue to expect a certain number of such incidents, and our arrangements provide for reducing such occurrences to the minimum possible. But I should like to say there are a great many very disconcerting rumours spread about. These rumours arise from the fact that the censorship of the Press at present is of a very strict kind from the point of view of saying aye or no to any particular piece of military information, and I think one consequence of that is that newspapers, in default of facts, are rather inclined to fill up their columns with gossip which reaches them from irresponsible quarters along the coast, where no doubt a great deal of apprehension may in the minds of nervous individuals prevail.

We are establishing to-day a Press bureau, and I am very glad to say that the right hon. and learned Member for the Walton Division of Liverpool (Mr. F. E. Smith) will preside over it. From that bureau a steady stream of trustworthy information supplied both by the War Office and the Admiralty can be given to the Press, which, without endangering military or naval interests, will serve to keep the country properly and truthfully informed from day to day of what can be told, and what is fair and reasonable; and thus, by providing as much truth as possible, exclude the growth of irresponsible rumours.

With the indulgence of the House, perhaps I may be allowed to say that we owe a very great debt to the Press of this country. During the precautionary period when we had no legal means of controlling them the proprietors and editors of the great newspapers, irrespective of class, or the party to which they belong, all combined together to take no notice of questions which the Admiralty and the War Office did not want referred to, and it was through that that our preparations were expeditiously and discreetly completed, without undue alarm being caused in this country at a time when no explanation could have been given. We wish to deal with the newspaper Press in such a way as to enable the people of this country to follow what is taking place reasonably and intelligibly. It is on information of that kind that panic and unnecessary alarm can best be avoided.

In regard to the business, the Government arrangements for the conclusion of the Session are not at this moment finally determined, and the House will meet on Monday at the usual time. My right hon. Friend (Mr. Illingworth) informs me that 2156 on Monday a Motion will be made to adjourn the House until Tuesday, 25th August.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1914/aug/07/mr-churchill-and-the-press
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australia and the Gallipoli Campaign

6 August 1915
Beginning of the August Offensive

5.30 pm - Units of the 1st Australian Division attacked Turkish trenches at Lone Pine.

6.00 pm - The Turkish front line at Lone Pine fell to the Australians and fierce Turkish counter-attacks began.

8.30 pm - The regiments of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles attacked up the valleys leading to the heights of the Sari Bair Range — Chunuk Bair and Hill 971. After this successful assault three columns of infantry — the New Zealand Infantry Brigade, the 29th Infantry Brigade of Sikhs and Gurkhas and the 4th Australian Infantry Brigade — began making their way up these valleys to attack the heights.

9.30 pm - British units begin landing at Suvla Bay.

7 August 1915
August Offensive

4.30 — 4.45 am - Four waves of men of the 3rd Australian Light Horse Brigade attacked Turkish trenches at the Nek. They were cut to pieces. Charles Bean wrote:

The flower of the youth of Victoria and Western Australia fell in that attempt.

4.30 pm - Unsuccessful diversionary attacks were made from Quinn's Post and Pope's Post.

10.15 & 11 am - New Zealand and Indian units attacked towards Chunuk Bair but fail to capture the peak. The 4th Australian Brigade became lost in the foothills leading to its objective — Hill 971 — and dug in. British units failed to make any progress at Suvla Bay.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/australia-gallipoli-campaign/august-1915.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Russell's Top, Gallipoli, Turkey, 7 August 1915
Photographer: Rev. Ernest Northcroft Merrington

"Russell's Top was part of a ridge line that stretched northwest from ANZAC Cove and joined the "second ridge", along which the ANZAC frontline was established, at the large round hill called Baby 700. Russell's Top was joined to Baby 700 by a thin bridge of land called the Nek.

"The Top" was the highest point within the ANZAC perimeter and commanded views along most of the Turkish line to the south of Baby 700. On it was sited an artillery battery and at least eight machine-guns. It was named after Brigadier Andrew Russell, commander of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade, who established his headquarters on it in May 1915." —Australian War Memorial

Rev Ernest Northcroft Merrington (the photographer), (1876-1953) was chaplain to the Australian Light Horse Regiment. He was a founding father of Emmanuel College.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationallibrarynz_commons/3466808876/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Cyril Royston Guyton Bassett

Cyril Royston Guyton Bassett (3 January 1892 – 2 January 1983) was a New Zealander recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. He was the first New Zealander to be awarded the VC in World War I.

He was 23 years old, and a corporal in the New Zealand Divisional Signal Company, New Zealand Expeditionary Force when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 7 August 1915 at Chunuk Bair Ridge, Gallipoli, Turkey, after the New Zealand Brigade had attacked and established itself on the ridge, Corporal Bassett, in full daylight and under continuous fire, succeeded in laying a telephone line from the old position to the new one on Chunuk Bair. He also did further gallant work in connection with the repair of telephone lines by day and night under heavy fire. He is quoted "I was so short that the bullets just passed over me".

He later achieved the rank of colonel.

During WW2, he trained others in skills he had attained in WW1. According to his daughter, her father rarely spoke about his achievements. "It just wasn't done".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyril_Royston_Guyton_Bassett
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Leonard Keysor

Leonard Maurice Keysor VC (also known as "Keyzor" or "Kyezor") (3 November 1885 – 12 October 1951) was a British-born Australian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry "in the face of the enemy" that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. Born in England, Keysor emigrated to Australia shortly before the outbreak of the First World War. He enlisted in the First Australian Imperial Force in August 1914 and served in Egypt before landing at Gallipoli, Turkey at the beginning of the campaign. On 7 August 1915 at Lone Pine, while serving as an acting lance-corporal, 29 year-old Keysor performed an act of bravery for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross. (...)

Early in the morning on 6 August 1915 the 1st Battalion carried out a diversionary attack at Lone Pine and after heavy fighting that lasted almost the entire day they managed to capture the Turkish trenches. After this more fighting would continue around the position for the next three days as the Turks attempted to regain the position. The fighting was carried out at close range, using bayonets and improvised grenades and bombs. Over the course of about 50 hours on 7–8 August, Keysor continually risked his life to pick up the Turkish grenades as they were thrown into the trenches and throw them back. Later, despite being wounded and ordered to seek medical attention, Keysor continued to remain in the line, volunteering to throw bombs for another company.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Keysor
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK - FOUNDER AND THE FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE TURKISH REPUBLIC

Mustafa Kemal put his signature under a legend of heroism at Çanakkale during the First World War, which had started in 1914, and had the Allied Powers admit to the fact that "Çanakkale is unpassable!" On March 18, 1915 when the English and French navies in an attempt to force their way up the Çanakkale Strait gave heavy loses, they decided to put units on land at Gallipoli Peninsula. The enemy forces which landed at Arıburnu on 25 April 1915 were stopped by 19th Divison under Mustafa Kemal's command at Conkbayırı. Mustafa Kemal was promoted to the rank of colonel after this victory. English forces attacked at Arıburnu once more on 6-7 August 1915. Mustafa Kemal, as the Commander of the Anafartalar Forces won the Anafartalar Victory on 6-7 August 1915. This victory was followed by the victories of Kireçtepe on August 17, and the Second Anafartalar Victory on August 21. Turkish nation who lost about 253.000 men at battle, had managed to emerge in honour against the Allied forces. Actually the fate at trenches changed when Mustafa Kemal addressed his soldiers with the words "I am not giving you an order to attack, I am ordering you to die!"

http://www.ataturk.com/content/view/24/43/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Nek

A series of smaller feints were launched on the morning of 7 August 1915, including the battle of the Nek, in which well over half of the Australian attacking forces became casualties. This battle featured in the 1981 film Gallipoli with Mel Gibson. Two regiments of the Australian Light Horse mounted an attack on Baby 700. The Nek is a narrow strip leading to Baby 700 Hill. At the time, the Anzac trenches were at its base. The Light Horsemen had left their horses in Egypt and fought as infantrymen. They were to be backed as they made their assault on the Turks by a naval bombardment and by New Zealanders attacking from the rear. Those who conceived the strategy had not taken account of the impenetrable terrain that would confront the New Zealanders, who were delayed by a day in taking up position. A failure to synchronise watches meant the naval bombardment stopped seven minutes before the first wave of soldiers went over the top of their trenches and they were slaughtered. Further confusion meant the attack was not aborted until four more groups of soldiers had gone to their deaths.

Other August assaults at Anzac were more successful, although they, too, incurred high casualties. In spite of difficulties that severely slowed the progress of the attack, the New Zealanders held the hill of Chunuk Bair above Anzac Cove for two days from 8 August before succumbing to a counterattack led by the Turkish leader Mustafa Kemal Bey. This action helped establish Kemal's reputation and contributed to him becoming the first leader of modern Turkey after the war.

http://www.nla.gov.au/gallipolidespatches/1-13-the_nek.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 20:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

IRISH BATTALIONS: SULVA BAY

Suvla Bay, August 1915:
For t’was better to die, neath an Irish sky,
than at Suvla or Sedd-el-Bahr.


So are the words of the Irish rebel song, ‘the Foggy Dew’. Had the thousands of Irishmen who died at Suvla or Sedd-el-Bahr been given a choice, they no doubt would have preferred to die 'neath an Irish sky.’

The initial Allied assault in April to take the Dardanelles had failed. In typical military thinking of the period, the solution was to throw more men at it. The objective of the attack this time was to take the beach and surrounding hills at Suvla Bay which lay approx. twenty five miles north of Cape Helles. Kitchener's first volunteer army was now trained, albeit very basically. A new Mediterranean Expeditionary Force was assembled under the command of General Sir Ian Hamilton.

The 10th (Irish) Division was the first volunteer Irish fighting unit to enter the Great War. It was commanded by an Irishman, Lt.-General Sir Bryan Mahon. The new volunteers went into the service battalions of the regular Irish Regiments, among which were the newly raised 6th and 7th battalions of the Dublin Fusiliers. They trained in the art of trench warfare in the Phoenix Park. Today, there is an outline of one of the trenches still to be seen in the Park, as a dip in the land running east/west in front of the Papal Cross. They trained in the art of musketry at Dollymount beach. The 6th and 7th Dublins were stationed at the Curragh and later at The Royal (Collins) Barracks in Dublin.

The 7th Battalion was an interesting collection of men mainly, although not all, from the professional classes of Dublin. There was a group of Rugby players who volunteered en bloc. In September 1914, about three hundred recruits were addressed at Lansdowne Road football grounds where they assembled in front of the then President of the IRFU, Mr. F.H. Browning. (Mr. Browning was killed during the rebellion in Easter week 1916. He was at the head of a group of unarmed veterans nicknamed the ‘Gorgeous Wrecks’ who were returning to Beggars Bush Barracks from their Easter Monday parade when they were ambushed.) There were many graduates and undergraduates from Trinity College who refused to take an officer's commission because they wanted to be equal with their peers. One chap named Ernest Julian, from Drumbane, Birr, Co. Offaly, an only son, was Reid Professor of Criminal Law at Trinity College when he enlisted. (President Mary Robinson held the same Chair in the early '70’s as did the new President, Mrs. Mary MacAleese in 1975.) This entire elite group of men formed what was known as "D" Company, the Pals. They were soon to be known as ‘the Toff’s among the Toughs,’ a reference to the nickname of the 2nd Battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers who were known as ‘the Old Toughs.’

They were not all Toffs, there were men like Private John Boyd, an only son from Donnybrook. John played rugby football for Clontarf and worked as a Clerk in the Dept. of Agriculture before he enlisted. Harry Boyd worked with his father in the well known pharmacists, Boileau and Boyd. William Boyd, no relation to the other men, was a Commercial Traveller who lived in Rathmines in Dublin and played rugby for Bective Rangers R.F.C. Charles F. Ball, Assistant Keeper in the Botanic Gardens and editor of the magazine 'Irish Gardening,' added a bit of social balance to the Company. Hugh Pollock, who was an Assistant Manager in a Tea Company in Sumatra, Indonesia, travelled all the way to Dublin to enlist as a private in the 7th Battalion. He was educated at St. Andrew’s College and played rugby for the Dublin club, Wanderers.

In late April, the 6th and 7th Battalions of the Dublin Fusiliers left Ireland for their assembly point at Basingstoke in England, prior to their departure for the Dardanelles. For fear of German spies in Ireland, Kitchener refused to allow the Irish Regiments a send-off parade. The Dublin Pals were having none of it. The splendour of the departure to England through the streets of Dublin was captured by the Irish Times on the 1st of May 1915 edition.

Led by the band of the 12th Lancers and the pipers of the Trinity College Officer Training Corps, they marched off from the Royal Barracks. Along the Liffey quays, crowds on the pavements and spectators in the windows cheered and waved. Outside the Four Courts, a large group of barristers, solicitors, officials and judges shouted good-bye to their friends. Little boys strutted along side the marching column, chanting their street songs,

Left, right; left right; here's the way we go,
Marching with fixed bayonets, the terror of every foe,
A credit to the nation, a thousand buccaneers,
A terror to creation, are the Dublin Fusiliers.

Not for them the direct route along the Liffey quays to the ships. Diverting across Essex Bridge, they marched through the commercial centre of Dame Street, then College Green, passing the Bank of Ireland and Trinity College where many of the Battalion had been students and one a Professor. Spectators became dense as the marching column crossed O'Connell Bridge and right wheeled onto the quays skirting the statue of O'Connell the Liberator. Emotion rose when well dressed ladies from the fashionable Georgian and Regency squares of south Dublin mingled with their poorer sisters in shawls from the Liberties and lesser squares of north Dublin. Together, they joined their husbands and sweethearts in the ranks to keep step with them the last few hundred yards.

For many who lined the Dublin streets that day it would be the last time they ever saw their loved ones. After training in Basingstoke, on the 10th of July at 3:30 pm as part of the 10th (Irish) Division, the Dublins set sail for Gallipoli on board the transport ship the H.M.T. Alaunia. Its Captain was Captain Rostron (Royal Naval Reserve). He had been the Captain of the Carpathia when it picked up survivors of the Titanic disaster in 1912.

Marching with the 6th Battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers that day, was 2nd Lieut. Robert Stanton from Cork City and Ordinance Sergeant James Doherty from Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim. Robert Stanton was born in Alexandra Place, Cork in 1886. He was the eldest son of a family of nine. He went to school in Cork CBC and later to study Law at Trinity College, Dublin. In 1907, he graduated from Trinity with B. A. and L.L.B. Degrees and was awarded a Gold Medal which was an award given to honours Law graduates. His father had a law practice in Cork and after graduation Robert returned to work as a solicitor with his father. Bob fell in love with a young lady and they decided to marry. His father refused permission for the couple to marry on the grounds that the young girl’s family had a history of T.B. This had a terrible effect on Bob, so much so that he left Cork and travelled to Dublin. It was on a train to Dublin that Bob met an ex-Trinity classmate of his who told him he should go to Clones, Co. Monaghan, as there wasn’t a catholic solicitor in Clones and he would do well. The Great War broke out and with it came a fever of excitement and adventure which spread among the young elite professional classes of Dublin, a fever which disguised all its horror behind a veil of youthful excitement and innocence.

Like many of his Trinity colleagues, Bob joined the 7th Battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers. On the 7th of August 1915, Bob was put ashore at Suvla Bay with the rest of his battalion.

Again through terrible logistics and poor planning, there followed utter carnage at these landings. The Dublins arrived in Gallipoli without any maps and any orders as to what to do when they got there. Prior to their departure for Gallipoli, the 10th (Irish) Division's artillery pieces went to France instead of Gallipoli. Water was in such a short supply that men nearly killed each other for a simple drink. When the fight against the Turks did begin, they even ran out of ammunition and resorted to throwing stones at the Turks. One pathetic account was of a Private Wilkins from the Pals Company. He was in a trench into which the Turks were lobbing grenades. Pte. Wilkins was catching them and throwing them back at the Turks. He caught five, the sixth one blew him to pieces. Lieut. Bob Stanton was killed when the Dublins led the assault on Scimitar Hill which Turks held, overlooking Suvla Bay. His body was never found because the shelling set fire to the bush.

On the 16th of August, Bob’s father and mother received a telegram from the War Office, which read,
Deeply regret to inform you that 2nd Lieut. R Stanton, 6th Dublin Fusiliers is reported wounded and missing believed killed in action between the 7th and 10th of August. Lord Kitchener expresses his sympathy.

The word believed suggested to Mr. and Mrs. Stanton that there was a chance that Bob might still be alive in a Turkish POW Camp. With the help of the American Embassy in Constantinople, his parents had a search done for Bob in the Turkish POW Camps. There was no luck as they received yet another telegram from the War Office stating that Bob was not a POW and it therefore must be assumed that he was dead. On the 1st of July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, Bob’s brother, Captain George Stanton, a young medical graduate from Trinity College Dublin serving in the R.A.M.C., received terrible stomach wounds. He too died in August 1916, at the age of twenty seven. George’s body was returned to Cork and given a full military funeral headed by a band of the Dublin Fusiliers.

Many years later, Bob Stanton’s younger brother Tom, himself to serve in Malta as a Doctor with the R.A.M.C. in the Great War, said of Bob:

"We younger brothers worshipped him. I should say he never became a solicitor by desire, but, he was born in a period when the eldest son as a rule stepped into his father's shoes. He was a very gentle type and every inch a man. He was twenty eight years old when he laid down his life at Gallipoli. We have never forgotten him."

As a footnote to this story, the young girl who was to marry Bob died at the age of eighty one in 1976. She never married. Bob Stanton’s name, along with Ernest Julian, John and Harry Boyd, are among the 480 Dublin Fusiliers on the Helles Memorial who died in Gallipoli.

In January 1916, the Allies pulled out of the Dardanelles. They suffered a loss of 250,000 killed wounded or missing. 3411 were members of the 10th (Irish) Division, of which 569 were from the 1st Battalion Dublin Fusiliers alone. The Allies had not moved from the beaches on which they had landed back in April 1915. Of the Irish at Gallipoli, the Unionist leader Edward Carson stated, ‘Their magnificent bravery in the face of insurmountable difficulties stands out amongst the countless acts of heroism in this war.' Professor Ernest Julian was dead. He was shot in the back and died on the 8th of August on board the Hospital Ship, Valdivia. He was buried at sea. So too was C.F. Ball from the Botanic Gardens, John Boyd and Hugh Pollack who came all the way from Indonesia to die on a beach in Turkey.

The Divisional Commander, General Hunter-Weston wrote of the 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers,

Well done, Blue Caps! I now take the first opportunity of thanking you for the good work you have done. You have achieved the impossible. You have done a thing which will live in history. When I first visited this place with other people of importance, we all thought a landing would never be made, but you did it and therefore the impossibilities were over come. … I am proud to be in command of such a distinguished regiment.

In Ireland at the end of 1915, the role the Irish troops played in Gallipoli was largely ignored and little or no official recognition was given to their achievement and sacrifice. On the 11th of May 1931, Captain R.G. Kelly, a H.Q. Lieutenant with the 7th Dublins, wrote from his home in Rathmines, Dublin, to General Aspinall-Oglander, the official historian of the Great War, about the events on Kiretch Tepe Sirt on the 15th and 16th of August 1915. Captain Kelly referred to the Turks lobbing bombs over the trench at the 7th Dublins.

Turkish bombs were caught and thrown back again. One private (Wilkin by name) caught four but the fifth unfortunately blew him to pieces. PS. I hold a copy of recommendation for this particular Private to whom no recognition was ever given, which of course was nothing out of the ordinary on Gallipoli.

Is there any wonder why recruitment in Ireland fell off after Gallipoli? The last word about the Irish at Gallipoli is best described by a Scottish soldier who saw the landings at Gallipoli and wrote in the Tablet newspaper Glasgow in January 1916:

Oh, but they deserve a rich reward! What surprises me is that the papers have not been full of their praises. It is a shame and a scandal because I can tell you there is not a man in the service who is aware of their gallant action but who would willingly do anything for the Irish people - yes the Irish Catholics. I have no religion but it was most charming and edifying to see these chaps with their beads and the way they prayed to God. We are all brothers, but to my dying day, I bow to the Irish; they saved the situation. Nothing is too good to give the country of which they are - or, rather were, such worthy representatives. They have the most perfect right to demand, and what is more to get, the freedom of their country and the right to rule it.

http://www.greatwar.ie/mb-sul.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 21:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

British infantry from The Wiltshire Regiment attacking near Thiepval, 7 August 1916

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wiltshire_Regiment_Thiepval_7_August_1916.jpg
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 21:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World War I Flight Timeline

August 7, 1916 - The Wright-Martin Aircraft Company is formed after the first of many mergers in the aviation industry.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/classic/world-war-i-flight-timeline1.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 21:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australian Corps

Corps Headquarters

August 7th 1918

To the Soldiers of the Australian Army Corps

For the first time in the history of this Corps all five Australian Divisions will tomorrow engage in the largest and most important battle operation ever undertaken by the Corps.

They will be supported by exceptionally powerful Artillery and by Tanks and Aeroplanes on a scale never previously attempted. – The full resources of our sister Dominions, the Canadian Corps will operate on our right, while two British Divisions will guard our left flank.

The many successes of which the Brigade and Battalions of the Corps have so brilliantly executed during the past four months have been but a prelude to, and the preparation for, this great and culminating effort.

Because of the completeness of our planned for disposition, of the magnitude of the operation, of the number of troops employed, and the depth to which we intend to over run the enemy’s positions, this battle will be one of the most memorable of the whole war and there can be no doubt that, by capturing our objectives, we shall inflict a blow upon the enemy which will make him stagger and will bring the end nearer.

I entertain no sort of doubt that every Australian soldier will worthily rise to so great an occasion, and that every man, imbued with the spirit of victory, will, inspite of every difficulty that may confront him, be animated by no other resolve than grim determination by no other resolve than grim determination to see through, to a clean finish, what ever his task be.

The work to be done tomorrow will perhaps make heavy demands upon endurance and staying powers of many of you; but I am confident that, inspite of excitement, fatigue, and physical strain, every man will carry on to the utmost of his physical strain, every man will carry on to the utmost of his powers until his goal is won; for the sake of AUSTRALIA, the empire and our cause.

I earnestly wish every soldier of the Corps the best of good fortune and a glorious and decisive victory, the story of which will re-echo through our world, and will live forever in the history of our own land.

Signed John Monash

Lieut.General Commanding AUSTRALIAN Corps

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-conflicts-periods/ww1/black-day.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 21:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

7 August 1918 → Commons Sitting → WAR SITUATION.

PRIME MINISTER'S REVIEW.


HC Deb 07 August 1918 vol 109 cc1412-508 1412

The PRIME MINISTER (Mr. Lloyd George) Mr. Speaker,—Four years ago the British Empire decided to throw the whole weight of its might into the greatest War which the world has ever witnessed. It did so not because British soil was invaded or even threatened with invasion, but because of an outrage upon international right. Had it not been for that decision, the whole course of the War would have been different. The history of the world for generations to come would have followed a different course. I do not wish in the least to exaggerate the part which the British Empire has taken in that conflict. But a mere glance at the events of the last four years will show how great and how decisive its influence has been upon the turn of those events. When the War began we had the most powerful Navy in the world. It was as powerful as the three next Navies of the world, and, when unity of command is taken into account, it was more powerful than the three next Navies. We had, however, the smallest Army of any great Power in Europe. We had a compact with France that if she were wantonly attacked, the United Kingdom would go to her support.

En zo gaat-ie nog een poosje door. Leesvoer op http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1918/aug/07/prime-ministers-review
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 21:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Charles Mangin on the Second Battle of the Marne, 7 August 1918

The Second Battle of the Marne - which ran from 15 July to 4 August 1918 - was intended as Germany's final major attempt at breakthrough on the Western Front prior to the arrival of ever-increasing U.S. troops on the battlefield.

In the event the battle proved a significant Allied victory. Once it became clear that the Germans had not only failed in their aim to win the war in the offensive, but had in fact lost ground, a number of German commanders, including Crown Prince Wilhelm, believed the war was lost.

Reproduced below is the official address given by French General Charles Mangin on 7 August 1915, directed to U.S. First and Second servicemen who, assisting Mangin's French Tenth Army, participated in the Allied counter-attacks launched on 18 August.

Official Address by General Charles Mangin, 7 August 1918

Officers, Non-commissioned Officers, and Soldiers of the American Army:

Shoulder to shoulder with your French comrades, you threw yourselves into the counter-offensive begun on July 18th. You ran to it as if going to a feast. Your magnificent dash upset and surprised the enemy, and your indomitable tenacity stopped counter-attacks by his fresh divisions. You have shown yourselves to be worthy sons of your great country and have gained the admiration of your brothers in arms.

Ninety-one cannon, 7,200 prisoners, immense spammer, and ten kilometres of reconquered territory are your share of the trophies of this victory. Besides this, you have acquired a feeling of your superiority over the barbarian enemy against whom the children of liberty are fighting. To attack him is to vanquish him.

American comrades, I am grateful to you for the blood you generously spilled on the soil of my country. I am proud of having commanded you during such splendid days and to have fought with you for the deliverance of the world.

Source Records of the Great War, Vol. VI, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/marne2_mangin1.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 21:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

August 1919 Needlecraft Magazine

O, o, o... wat een heerlijke site! Wink http://antique-crochet.com/antique-womens-magazines/needlecraft-home-arts-magazine/august-1919-needlecraft-magazine-with-2-crochet-patterns-by-mary-card
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 22:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Inname van de Stad Luik - Vrijdag 7 augustus 1914

In een der oude kronieken lazen we de volgende waarneming:

„Te middernacht vertoont zich aan den oostelijken hemel een klein licht, dat nader en nader komt. Plotseling straalt een verblindend licht naar beneden. Beneden in dien lichtschijn verschijnt alles, alsof het helder dag is. Dan plotseling een geweldig rumoer. Beneden is alles weer duister. En aan den hemel gaat rustig het kleine licht verder. Maar plotseling slaan daar beneden hoog de vlammen op. Daar schiet weer een lichtstraal naar beneden. En nu is het duidelijk te zien, dat het geheimzinnige licht een luchtschip is. Zie, aan een lang touw hangt een metalen korf en in dien korf staat een man. Met beide handen werpt hij iets naar beneden. Op de verlichte plaats. En dadelijk daarop verdwijnt de lichtschijn. Een oorverdoovend geweld, de aarde beeft en langzaam stijgt een dikke rookzuil naar boven. Twaalfmaal herhaalt zich dat. Dan verdwijnt het geheimzinnige vaartuig in de duisternis van den nacht en wordt het rustig in Luik”.

Bij deze zeppelinaanval lieten negen mensen het leven.

Na de aanval begon de beschieting van Luik die vooraf zou gaan aan de stormaanval van de veertiende brigade.
Ludendorff had besloten, na tevergeefs te hebben gewacht op berichten van andere brigades, alleen met de veertiende brigade Luik binnen te trekken. La Chartreuse werd eerst ingenomen waarna men via de twee nog in tact zijnde bruggen het centrum van Luik binnentrok.
Ludendorff schijnt in de veronderstelling te hebben geleefd dat de citadel reeds bezet was door andere Duitse eenheden. Hij besloot er heen te rijden met zijn adjudant en klopte op de deur. Tot zijn grote verbazing werd de poort door een Belgische onderofficier geopend waarna de bezetting zich zonder slag of stoot overgaf.

Later op de dag vond in de citadel een ontmoeting plaats tussen de burgemeester van Luik, de heer Kleyer, en de chef van de staf van het tiende legerkorps, graaf Lamsdorff. De burgers van Luik zouden gespaard worden indien zij zich niet met geweld tegen de Duitsers verzetten. Om hier zeker van te zijn namen de Duitsers enkele burgers in gijzeling waaronder de burgemeester en de bisschop van Luik. De gijzelaars zouden na twee dagen hun vrijheid terugkrijgen.
Generaal Emmich heeft de burgemeester later medegedeeld dat hij per direct de forten van Luik moest laten capituleren anders zou de stad worden platgebrand. De burgemeester is hier niet op ingegaan.

Bij het vallen van de avond waren nog drie Duitse brigades door de fortenring gebroken die zich bij de veertiende brigade voegden. Een van deze brigades was de aanval begonnen op de rechter maasoever om zo via Herstal Luik binnen te trekken.

Na de inname van de stad probeerden de Duitsers rust en orde te bewerkstelligen. Verschillende proclamaties werden aangeplakt waarin gewaarschuwd werd tegen acties van franctireurs en waarin gedreigd werd dat ondermijnende acties met de doodstraf zouden worden bestraft.
De Luikse Cockeril-fabrieken werden in beslag genomen nadat de directeur van het bedrijf had geweigerd zijn fabriek ter beschikking te stellen voor de productie van granaten ten behoeve van de Duitsers. Zij stelden een nieuwe directeur aan. Aan diens oproep aan de abeiders om weer te gaan werken werd geen gehoor gegeven.
De Duitsers hadden alle toegangen tot Luik gebarricadeerd die 24 uur per dag werden bewaakt. Op alle belangrijke punten en wegen werd gecontroleerd.
De Belgische Garde Civique werd door de Duitsers in stand gehouden. Maar nu waren zij ongewapend en droegen zij een witte band met de Duitse rijksadelaar erop.

http://www.ssew.nl/strijd-om-luik-5-augustus-tot-16-augustus-1914
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 22:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Vluchtelingen uit België

Aan het begin van de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1914-1918) wilde het Duitse leger over Belgisch grondgebied naar Frankrijk. De Belgische regering hield echter vast aan haar neutraliteit en weigerde het verzoek om Duitse troepen vrije doortocht te geven. Het Duitse leger viel vervolgens België binnen en daarop vertrokken een miljoen Belgen, burgers maar ook soldaten, halsoverkop naar Nederland. Nog eens 500.000 mensen vluchtten naar Engeland of Frankrijk. Toen het oorlogsgeweld zich na oktober 1914 naar Frankrijk verplaatste keerden de meeste vluchtelingen terug naar huis. Zo'n 135.000 Belgen bleven echter tot het einde van de oorlog in Nederland wonen. Zij keerden pas na 1918 naar huis terug.

Massale vlucht

De vluchtelingen staken de Nederlandse grens over waar ze maar konden. ‘Met treinen, met alles dat wielen had, zelfs te voet kwamen de vluchtelingen de grens over. Murw geslagen bleven zij hangen in de grensprovincies, één miljoen mensen.’ Nederland was niet voorbereid op zo'n massale opvang van vluchtelingen. Veel Belgen waren halsoverkop vertrokken en kwamen dus berooid bij de Nederlandse grens aan. Nederland liet ze toch toe omdat het medeleven onder de Nederlandse burgers groot was. Koningin Wilhelmina zei in haar troonrede van 1914: 'Diep begaan met het lot van alle volken, die in den krijg zijn meegesleept, draagt Nederland de buitengewone lasten, die het wordt opgelegd, gewillig en ontvangt met open armen alle ongelukkigen, die binnen zijn grenzen een toevlucht zoeken.' (...)

Kleding en voedsel

In het begin was in Nederland de verontwaardiging over de Duitse agressie in België groot. Spontaan stelden mensen geld, kleding, levensmiddelen en zelfs hun huizen ter beschikking aan de Belgische vluchtelingen. Medeleven leidde ook tot vele particuliere initiatieven om de vluchtelingen te helpen. In heel Nederland werden steuncomités opgericht die geld en goederen inzamelden. Op 7 augustus 1914 werd op het Belgisch consulaat in Amsterdam het ‘Nederlands comité tot steun aan Belgische en andere vluchtelingen’ opgericht. Dit comité coördineerde alle verschillende lokale initiatieven. Al snel werden de enorme aantallen vluchtelingen uit de grensprovincies verspreid over heel Nederland en namen provinciale steuncomité's de zorg over.

http://www.vijfeeuwenmigratie.nl/term/Vluchtelingen%20uit%20Belgi%C3%AB/volledige-tekst
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 23:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Het dagboek van een Naarder Schweizer

Een van de Naarder Schweizers legde zijn ervaringen vast in een
dagboek. Dat was de in 1882 geboren Willem Lambertsz de Gooijer, die
in 1907 de Vesting verliet. Willems vader was al op jonge leeftijd
overleden. Zijn moeder de weduwe Mietje de Gooijer-Schrager, moest
als brugwachtster in het onderhoud van haarzelf en een stel jonge
kinderen voorzien. Vanuit een ‘rijkswoning’ bediende zij de ‘Groene
Brug’ in de Amsterdamsestraatweg. Die rijkswoning is er niet meer,
maar de brug (zij het vernieuwd) nog wel, het is de eerste vanuit de
Vesting in de richting van Muiden. Hoewel werkzaam als boerenknecht
hielp Willem waar mogelijk, tot aan zijn vertrek naar de Molkerei.
Willem’s ‘Schweizer-dagboek’ bestond uit een eenvoudig schoolcahier
dat hij met zwierig handschrift vol schreef met de in Duitsland
opgedane ervaringen. Op het etiket pende hij ‘Herinneringen uit de
jaren 1914-1915’.
Lezenswaardig is vooral de beschrijving van zijn laatste roerige
week in Duitsland. Dat was de week vanaf eind juli tot aan zijn
terugkeer in Naarden op vrijdag 7 augustus 1914. Willem verbleef
toen in het Duitse dorp Schaephuysen, dat zo’n tien kilometer van de
stad Moers verwijderd lag. Zijn broers Gerrit en Rijk alsmede twee
neven werkten ook in de omgeving. Zijn belevenissen opgetekend in
het dagboek volgen in de rest van dit verhaal.

Lees verder op http://naarder-schweizers-1914.blogspot.com/
Zie ook http://gooijer.netfirms.com/naardense%20scheizers.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 23:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1915)

7 augustus 1915 - “Het Circus Carré komt niet naar Tilburg, aangezien de militaire autoriteiten een proclamatie afkondigden dat na 7 uur ’s avonds niemand zich op straat mag begeven, met meer dan drie personen en de café’s om 9 uur gesloten moeten zijn.” (Tilburgse Courant)

http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=188:06-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1915&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 23:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World War I Letter and Photos of Lawrence R. Sharp

England

Aug. 7, 1918

Dear Mother,

Your letter written on July 11 came yesterday, Tuesday 6. That was the first letter I have had since about July 20. I am satisfied that there is one or two letters that I have failed to get so far. But that letter yesterday was a good one, and if I do not get those others I will not grumble

I started this letter this morning, but have been busy all day and have not got to finish it yet. But I am going to send you something before going to bed. I wrote Papa a long letter on the 4th of this month and trust that he gets it, for I intended that he get it about his birthday. I am curious to know if he gets it at all.

I am sorry that the letter you mentioned had some of it cut out. I suspect that several I have been sending lately have had some cut out. I am wondering if you know where I am. I guess that the post mark will show that though. At any rate, if you were to address a letter to me at Sheffield, England, I would get it.

I cannot help but believe that we are going to get the Boche within the next few months. This winter, I am afraid is going to bring fearful things to the Austrians and Germans. England is in a much better condition than she was last winter so I am told by good authority. But no one can realize just how things are even now if they have not seen them. Mother, if you never see me again pray God and thank Him over and over that your lot is what it is. You have toiled faithfully and hard, but you have been where you could see some of the results of your labor. A woman dropped dead in the factory the other day 81 years of age. That means that she had toiled there all her life and when death came she had not enough to get a decent burial. I am longing for the day when I can tell even the half of my story. The wife who has a husband in our army had better be glad that he is a U.S. soldier for more reasons that one. But I am inching up pretty close to the toes of the censorship so I had better hush.

Say, I had a letter from Rumsey today. He said that he had a new car now. His old one got shot to pieces by a ?. He has not been hurt so far. I certainly wish I was with him. A great life if you don’t weaken.

Tell Quincy that he must live up to that uniform now. That when a little boy gets a uniform he must live as the scout book, which I sent him last fall, directed a scout to live. The men in uniform today are the best men of the country and the little boys who wear a uniform should try to be even better than the best.

Speaking of picking peaches, if I had those crates you mentioned here, I would be pretty well fixed. I am sure I could sell each peach for 50c apiece. That is some price, isn’t it? Watermelons, figs, gourds and things of that kind are unknown in this part of England. Say, some of these times drop a lock of seed cotton in a letter. I see cotton here sometimes, but only in bales, but they look like the bales at home only the ?agging is about torn away. So a lock of seed cotton would be a curiosity.

I am feeling fine. Have not been sick a day since I have been in Eng. And if a person can eat one of our meals and live 24 hrs. he will live forever.

Your boy,

Lawrence

(Written on the back page of this letter is an additional note.)

The enclosed coin is an English half-penny or two farthings. It is worth one cent U.S.

The penny is of same material but about the size of a half dollar. Don’t fail to tell me if you get this.

Lawrence

http://www.carthagetexas.com/Center/veterans/wwI/lsharp8_7_18.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13483
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Aug 2010 23:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Bij in beroering: het 6de Waarneming Smaldeel

7 augustus 1918: Sergeant piloot Boël, ontsnapt uit Duitsland en zopas gevormd in de School van het Vliegwezen, doet een dodelijke vrille in de buurt van Houtem.

http://www.mil.be/aircomp/units/index.asp?LAN=nl&FILE=&ID=617&PAGE=11&MENU=432
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Tandorini



Geregistreerd op: 11-6-2007
Berichten: 6749
Woonplaats: Laarne

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2010 22:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

7 augustus 1876, het echtpaar Adam Zelle en Antje van der Meulen krijgt op deze dag een dochter, genaamd: Margaretha Geertruida Zelle. Beter gekend onder haar artiestennaam: Mata Hari.

http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten/BWN/lemmata/bwn3/zelle
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=2099&highlight=mata+hari
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=11085&highlight=mata+hari
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=12715&highlight=mata+hari
_________________
"Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae"
"Van hen(de Galliërs) allemaal zijn de Belgen de dappersten"
Julius Caesar(100 VC - 44 VC)
http://nl.escertico.wikia.com/wiki/Militaria_Wiki
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Finnbar
Moderator


Geregistreerd op: 5-11-2009
Berichten: 6975
Woonplaats: Uaso Monte

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2011 6:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

AUGUST 7, 1914

The Belgian Front.
==Ludendorff occupies the town of Liège, and personally seizes the citadel [morning], but the forts surrounding the city fight on
==France awards the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honor to Liège
==German cavalry probes Huy

The BEF.
==Advance parties of the BEF secretly cross to France to prepare assembly sites for the main body of the British Army

The Northwestern Front.
==Fournier, commander of the Maubeuge fortress, accurately warns that a massive German offensive over the Meuse is likely - Joffre promptly sacks him for defeatism

Alsace.
==French VII Corps takes Altkirch after a classic bayonet charge [500-1100.AM] - a French offensive in Alsace is underway


===> http://cnparm.home.texas.net/Wars/Marne/Marne02.htm
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2014 10:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

7 augustus 1914
Het Luikse landschap is desolaat. Boerderijen zijn doorzeefd. Langs wegen liggen lijken. Welke feiten halen nog het nieuws?

http://www.standaard.be/cnt/dmf20140730_01197644
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Aug 2014 10:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Vom Vormarsch in Belgien

Ein kühner Handstreich


Quote:
Berlin, 7. Aug. (W. B.)
Unsere Vorhuten rückten gestern längs der ganzen Grenze in Belgien ein. Eine unbedeutende Truppenabteilung versuchte einen Handstreich auf Lüttich mit großer Kühnheit. Einzelne Reiter drangen in die Stadt ein und wollten sich des Kommandanten bemächtigen, der sich nur durch die Flucht retten konnte. Der Handstreich auf die modern ausgebaute Festung selbst glückte nicht. Die Truppen stehen vor der Festung in Fühlung mit dem Gegner.
Natürlich wird die gesamte Presse des feindlichen Auslandes diese Unternehmung, die auf den Gang der großen Operationen ohne jeden Einfluß ist, zu einer Niederlage stempeln. Für uns ist sie nur eine in der Kriegsgeschichte einzig dastehende Tat und ein Beweis für die todesmutige Angriffslust unserer Truppen. 2)


http://www.stahlgewitter.com/14_08_07.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group