Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

1917-1921: The Ukrainian Makhnovist movement

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Politiek en strategie Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Sep 2006 14:10    Onderwerp: 1917-1921: The Ukrainian Makhnovist movement Reageer met quote

The history of the revolutionary movement in the Ukraine - the Makhnovists - at the time of the 1917 Russian Revolution. The revolution in the Ukraine was a libertarian, anarchist revolution, and the workers and peasants fought both Bolshevik domination and Tsarist reaction.

Official historians have failed to record the military genius of Nestor Makhno and the heroic deeds of his comrades in the Revolutionary Insurrection Army of the Ukraine. If the Makhnovists, as they became known, are mentioned at all they are referred to as "bandits" or (rather bizarrely) as part of the local right-wing "Kulak" movement. But if truth is the first casualty of war, then the history of war must be a pack of lies.

Long live the revolution

In February 1917, there was a Popular uprising in the Russian empire. The Tsar abdicated the principal political parties - most of them Socialist, and began to set up a crude parliamentary democracy, led by the Mensheviks. But Russia was a big, bleak, backward old empire that sprawled across five time zones, communication was bad; the uprisings continued. Radicals were released from prison, dissidents returned from exile, and ordinary people became increasingly aware of the possibilities of communal power. Peasants chased out the landowners, workers took over the factories and many organized themselves democratically through local mass meetings - Soviets.

Freedom was in the air. Much of the population had tasted it or at least had a whiff of it, it seemed to be out there for the taking. There seemed nothing to fear but the fear of freedom. Lenin (of the minority Bolsheviks) was one of the first politicians to sense the mood of the people. He realized that by adopting the popular slogans of the masses - "land to the peasants," "'worker control," and "all power to the soviets," the Bolsheviks, under his leadership could seize power and move to the next phase of the "Marxist" revolution - "The dictatorship of the Proletariat.

In the months that followed, Lenin persuaded the Bolsheviks that his scam was a runner and they concentrated their efforts on gaining influence in the Soviets and in the army. The October revolution of 1917 was a spontaneous affair, The Bolsheviks simply pushed through the crowd shouting "Stand aside! There's nothing to be afraid of- trust me, I'm a doctor". Freedom was quarantined and strictly rationed. Soon, with the Bolshevik Secret Police, the Cheka quietly overseeing the running of the Soviets and the trade unions, freedom had disappeared.

Anarchy in the Ukraine

During the uprisings and reaction that followed the October Revolution, the fertile earth of the Southern Ukraine was trampled under the boots of at least four advancing and retreating armies. Variously at war with each other [and] faced with a strong spirit of independence amongst the local insurgent peasants, none of these forces conquered the region or stayed long enough to set up any form of government.

Official historians have failed to record the military genius of Nestor Makhno and the heroic deeds of his comrades in the Revolutionary Insurrection Army of the Ukraine. If the Makhnovists, as they became known, are mentioned at all they are referred to as "bandits" or (rather bizarrely) as part of the local right-wing "Kulak" movement. But if truth is the first casualty of war, then the history of war must be a pack of lies.

Makhno was of poor peasant stock, an anarchist who had spent many years in prison for "terrorist activities" against the Tsar. He had been released in the February amnesty, and by October was in the thick of it - redistributing the land and resources. The Bolshevik party found it difficult to recruit or organise in the Ukraine, so Lenin decided to use the republic as a bargaining chip with Germany in Russia's withdrawal from the First World War.

Threatened by powerful enemies on all sides, Makhno and thousands of his fellow peasants launched a campaign of armed resistance so wild and imaginative that it became the stuff of instant legend. Theatrical hit-and-run attacks disguised as enemy officers, daring assassinations, robbing the rich, giving to the poor, it all reads like the further adventures of Robin Hood. And Makhno, though only 28, was honoured with the title of Batko ("little father") as he was 5'4".
The Revolutionary Insurrection Army soon became a fully operational volunteer army numbering 50 000, and for three years, the million or so peasants of the Ukraine learned to live in a lawless society under fire. A society based on co-operation with no state power, no politicians, and subsequently no concept of property - in effect, a state of Anarchy.

The Revolutionary Insurrection Army liberated several northern cities from the Ukrainian Nationalists. They threw open the prisons, blew up police stations, wasted the bosses and returned power directly to the workers. They ignored the local Bolsheviks and other socialist authoritarians.

1918 saw Germany's defeat in WW1 and the Bolsheviks turned their attention once more to the Ukraine. They established a political foothold in the northern cities and then moved south with the Red Army, ostensibly to defend the revolution against the Tsarist "Whites" and nationalists.

Fighting under the black flag of Anarchy, the Revolutionary Insurrection Army were renowned for their bravery, moreover they were respected for their honour and revolutionary ethics - they elected their own commanders, were self disciplined and owed their allegiance solely to the insurgent peasants. Their military alliance with the Bolsheviks started interfering with the politics of the local free communes.

Respect for the Revolutionary Insurrection Army's idealism led thousands of Red army soldiers to defect to them. Trotsky, the Bolshevik Commissar for war, soon replaced troops with Chinese and Lettish soldiers who spoke different languages to the Ukraine to prevent fraternising and to counter the defections. Elsewhere in Russia, idealists began to offer their services to Makhno and the movement grew, developing an education and cultural wing publishing newspapers and propaganda.

By 1920, Trotsky's tactics had become ugly. He ordered the assassination of thousands of villagers loyal to the Revolutionary Insurrection Army and he withdrew Red Army troops from the front and allowed the Tsarist Cossacks to overrun the southern Ukraine. The Makhnovists retreated, a growing caravan of their supporters and refugees trailing behind them, until eventually this vast nomadic village was boxed on all sides by a variety of enemy armies. The Red Army waited.

In a brilliant stroke, the Revolutionary Insurrection Army attacked their enemies where they were the strongest, turned their weapons against them, and went on to liberate the southern Ukraine once more. Trotsky once again offered a military deal. Makhno agreed, subject to the release of all Anarchist prisoners through Russia and was once again betrayed. On the 26th November 1920, the Makhnovist commanders were invited to a joint conference - they were met by a firing line squad.

Makhno, ever the romantic hero, eluded capture and continued to fight on, but the Bolsheviks had weakened his grass roots support and the war weary Ukranian peasants were slow to pick up the pieces. Their brief flirtation with freedom was over.

"We have all flirted with freedom and, deep inside all of us have the urge to make it a serious relationship. The Anarchist values of individual freedom, grass roots democracy, and the decentralisation of ALL forms of power are, if anything, more pertinent today then over. See you on the barricades."
- Tony Allen, Sept 1990-

The remainder of the Revolutionary Insurrection Army managed to fight their way to Romania where many went their own ways into exile In other lands. A few remained to reorganise and fight Ukraine. In response to the bloody and wholesale massacre of fellow Anarchists by Lenin and his bloodthirsty butchers, the Communist Party HQ in Moscow was blown up in September 1921.

From Zabalaza

http://libcom.org/history/1917-1921-the-ukrainian-makhnovist-movement
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Ernst Friedrich
Gast





BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Sep 2006 11:52    Onderwerp: Nestor Machno Reageer met quote

Nestor Machno: anarchist ? Robin Hood ? Avonturier en woesteling ?

Deze discussie was er midden jaren zeventig ook in Nederland. Ik herinner me (correct ?) een debat in Maatstaf (of was het De Gids ?) en 'dieper onder de grond' anarcho-bladen.
Privé Domein bracht het absolute hoogtepunt van haar reeks uit: Paustowskij en natuurlijk had Machno het pad van Paustowskij gekruist. Ik meen zittend in en fauteuil op een trein, en in het voorbijrijden van stations uit de heup schietend op wie hem niet beviel.
Hoeveel het met de Eerste Wereldoorlog te maken heeft kan ik niet zo zeggen. Het Russische soldaten-, fabrieks- en plattelandsproletariaatsland ontworstelde zich aan de slavernij. En er was plaats genoeg voor wie zich als de redder van het vaderland opwierp.
"Onrustige jeugd' heet het desbetreffende deel van Paustowskij's autobiografie laconiek.

Nestor Machno, jarenlang niets meer van gehoord. De groep die zich beijverde hem salonfahig te maken en in the hall of fame van de ware volkstribunen (met Che Guevara en zo) op te nemen, heeft toch gefaald. Anton Constandse (NRC, VPRO) was hun voorman.

http://home.planet.nl/~ideefix/nestorma.html. In deze biografische schets wordt het evenwicht wel zo'n beetje bewaard.
Naar boven
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Sep 2006 6:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
Hoeveel het met de Eerste Wereldoorlog te maken heeft kan ik niet zo zeggen. Het Russische soldaten-, fabrieks- en plattelandsproletariaatsland ontworstelde zich aan de slavernij. En er was plaats genoeg voor wie zich als de redder van het vaderland opwierp.

Ik weet het niet of WO1 helemaal losstaat bij dit soort omwentelingen.
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Ernst Friedrich
Gast





BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Sep 2006 9:22    Onderwerp: De sociale beweging in Rusland en WO I Reageer met quote

Yvonne @ 14 Sep 2006 7:30 schreef:
Quote:
Hoeveel het met de Eerste Wereldoorlog te maken heeft kan ik niet zo zeggen. Het Russische soldaten-, fabrieks- en plattelandsproletariaatsland ontworstelde zich aan de slavernij. En er was plaats genoeg voor wie zich als de redder van het vaderland opwierp.

Ik weet het niet of WO1 helemaal losstaat bij dit soort omwentelingen.


Een terechtwijzing, Yvonne ?
Ik doel overigens op een discusie over de vraag of er zonder WO I wel een revolutie of geen revolutie zou hebben plaatsgehad in Rusland. In een tekstje dat ik in de gauwigheid over Machno opduikelde bijvoorbeeld, wordt dat verband rechtstreeks gelegd:

In maart 1917 brak in Rusland een politieke revolutie uit, welke vergaande gevolgen had. De onmiddellijke oorzaak van de revolutie was de eerste wereldoorlog. Het Russische leger slokte de hele agrarische en industriële produktie op, waardoor de burgers een tekort aan voedsel, kleding en brandstof kregen. Het produktie-apparaat was echter ook niet in staat het leger voldoende van goederen te voorzien. Deze situatie veroorzaakte verzet tegen de tsaar en tegen de oorlog welke zich uitte in rellen en stakingen. De, door de tsaar verdaagde, Doema sloot zich bij het verzet aan en nam de regeringstaak over. De tsaar zag zich gedwongen af te treden ten gunste van een Voorlopige Regering o.l.v. Lwow. Een van de eerste daden van de nieuwe regering was het verlenen van een algehele amnestie, waardoor Arsjinof en Machno weer op vrije voeten kwamen. Machno keerde met zijn verworven kennis naar de Oekraïne terug, terwijl Arsjinof in Moskou bleef waar hij zich bij de Federatie van Anarchistische Groepen voegde. Een jaar later vertrok hij naar het Donetzbekken in het oosten van de Oekraïne om zich daar met propa- gandistische zaken bezig te houden. In 1919 verscheen Arsjinof in de westelijke Oekraïne waar hij zich aansloot bij de Nabat en de Machnovstsjina.

Anderen benadrukken dat Rusland op dat moment al een heel wat revolutiepogingen achter de rug heeft, van socialisten, anarchisten en (verschillende facties van) communisten. De regeermacht van de tsaar zou onafhankelijk van de wereldoorlog zeker ook zijn gevallen.
Hoe dan ook, door zo vroeg in de oorlog ten aanval te trekken, in Oostpruisen, 'onttrok' de tsaar heel veel potentiele, gewapende aanhang aan de revolutionaire agitatoren (uit Sint Petersburg).

Overigens sloeg de door jou aangehaalde zin op Machno's beweging. Daarvan kan ik niet zo een, twee, drie zeggen hoe die te duiden is binnen de geschiedenis van de Eerste Wereldoorlog.
Die man, Machno, heeft een geweldige maar tegenstrijdige reputatie. Hij organiseerde de moord op de mennonieten, zijn bendes gingen plunderend en verkrachtend door de Ukraine en hij bediende zich van anarchistische symbolen uitsluitend om zijn criminaliteit een geur van politiek idealisme te geven.
Dat is de ene visie.
En daarnaast was er dan zo iemand als in Nederland Anton Constandse die in Machno een vrijdenker, een vrijbuiter, een volksheld zag. Daarbij is het van belang te bedenken dat Rusland een eerbiedwaardige anarchistische traditie heeft. Inmiddels staat anarchisme gelijk met terrorisme, maar ik doel hier op de beweging van Bakoenin en op de anarchistische filosoof Kropotkin die rond de voorlaatste eeuwwisseling in Europa een respectabele aanhang hadden. Constandse zag Machno in die traditie.
Naar boven
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Sep 2006 9:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oh, absoluut geen terechtwijzing
Wijt de onhandige uitspraak aan het vroege tijdstip van posten Smile
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Ernst Friedrich
Gast





BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Okt 2006 9:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

In de gauwigheid dat ik in de boekhandel het boek van de Britse historicus Orlanda Figes over de Russsiche revolutie en wat daarvoor was en daarna kwam, Tragedie van een volk inzag, zag ik ook een hoofdstuk over Machno.
Ik kom er vroeg of laat op terug.
Naar boven
Kameraad Mauser



Geregistreerd op: 18-4-2014
Berichten: 4

BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Apr 2014 23:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Onlangs kwam ik enkele berichten tegen die vermeldden dat Orlando Figes nogal slordig omgaat met feiten...

http://www.historischnieuwsblad.nl/nl/nieuws/18934/orlando-figes-beschuldigd-van-broddelwerk.html
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Kameraad Mauser



Geregistreerd op: 18-4-2014
Berichten: 4

BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Apr 2014 23:17    Onderwerp: Re: De sociale beweging in Rusland en WO I Reageer met quote

Ernst Friedrich @ 14 Sep 2006 9:22 schreef:

Die man, Machno, heeft een geweldige maar tegenstrijdige reputatie. Hij organiseerde de moord op de mennonieten, zijn bendes gingen plunderend en verkrachtend door de Ukraine en hij bediende zich van anarchistische symbolen uitsluitend om zijn criminaliteit een geur van politiek idealisme te geven.


Bron?
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Kameraad Mauser



Geregistreerd op: 18-4-2014
Berichten: 4

BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Apr 2014 23:29    Onderwerp: Re: De sociale beweging in Rusland en WO I Reageer met quote

Ernst Friedrich @ 14 Sep 2006 9:22 schreef:

Anderen benadrukken dat Rusland op dat moment al een heel wat revolutiepogingen achter de rug heeft, van socialisten, anarchisten en (verschillende facties van) communisten. De regeermacht van de tsaar zou onafhankelijk van de wereldoorlog zeker ook zijn gevallen.
Hoe dan ook, door zo vroeg in de oorlog ten aanval te trekken, in Oostpruisen, 'onttrok' de tsaar heel veel potentiele, gewapende aanhang aan de revolutionaire agitatoren (uit Sint Petersburg).




Het was al bezig toen de Decembristen een opstand voorbereidden en uitvoerden. Gegeven de de revolutie van 1905 met Bloedige Zondag en dan verder de leuke acties van de zwarte Honderden...


Ernst Friedrich @ 14 Sep 2006 9:22 schreef:

Overigens sloeg de door jou aangehaalde zin op Machno's beweging. Daarvan kan ik niet zo een, twee, drie zeggen hoe die te duiden is binnen de geschiedenis van de Eerste Wereldoorlog.


Makhno borstelde, al hetgeen niet thuishoorde in Oekraine buiten.

K.u.K., Duitsers, Polen, Nationalisten en kameraden die zich niet aan hun woord hielden.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Politiek en strategie Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group