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Great War Tribute-1 juli 1916

 
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Yvonne
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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Dec 2006 19:25    Onderwerp: Great War Tribute-1 juli 1916 Reageer met quote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqndnU8Ze6g
Ontroerend mooi gedaan.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Dec 2006 19:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Doedelzakmuziek raakt sowieso altijd al een gevoelige snaar bij mij, en dan die beelden erbij...
Sad
wauw
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 9:53    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Vandaag 95 jaar geleden:
http://www.iwm.org.uk/server/show/nav.00o
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 9:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Somme offensive was the main Allied attack along the Western Front in 1916. Launched on July 1st along a 19 mile front line north of the River Somme between Amiens and Péronne, it eventually ended on 18th November due to bad weather.

Originally intended to be an offensive dominated by French forces, with the British in support, it’s primary objective would be to smash the German army and deplete their manpower reserves. This was never going to be a nimble, clever campaign. Oh No. Just brute strength and attrition please waiter.

As it was their show, the decision to launch the offensive in the Somme region was down to the French high command, and it was down to the location of available manpower and resource rather than any grand strategy or plan. Haig preferred an attack in the north of Belgium to check the growing U-boat problem emanating from the Belgian ports but the politics of the situation forced him to comply. So everything was agreed. Hands were shook, backs were patted and cigars lit. The ‘big push’ was pencilled in for August 1916.

But, being the party poopers they are, the Germans messed up all the plans when they launched their own offensive at Verdun at the beginning of 1916. Suddenly France was the one being ‘bled white’ and within a few months it was clear that France would not be in any fit state to lead a major offensive. In fact it was touch and go as to whether they would survive as a fighting unit. They needed help from Britain to relieve the pressure at Verdun, and they needed it fast.

So, the date of the attack was brought forward to the beginning of July, and it was now a large scale British diversionary attack, with only minimal French support. Planning passed to Haig, and it was game on.

The plan was simple: Mass more guns than have ever been massed before to fire more shells than had ever been fired before, for longer than had ever been done before. This would completely smash the German defences, cut their wire to smithereens and shatter the resolve and morale of the enemy soldiers. Then, the infantry, some 750,000 men (of which a large portion were made up from Kitchener’s new Pals Battalions), would advance and consolidate the positions, with cavalry at the ready in order to attempt a complete breakthrough if the opportunity arose.

Lees verder:
The Battle of the Somme (1916) in 833 Words.

http://worldwarone.wordpress.com/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 9:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Myths of the 1st Day of the Somme
The story of the Somme given in most textbooks, is a generalised picture of foolish generals, who - having drilled discipline and 'battlefield morale' into the men - carelessly ordered them to walk into the machine-guns.

This account is typical:
On 1 July an enormous British army began to move slowly across 'no-man's-land' towards the German defences. The soldiers had been told the enemy trenches would be smashed. They had expected shell-shocked soldiers ready to surrender... Everywhere they met a hail of accurate machine-gun fire... A brave volunteer army had marched to its death.
LE Snellgrove, The Modern World Since 1870 (1968)

You are welcome to challenge me on this, but I think, when you read the accounts, you will find that this is a misrepresentation of the truth:
Few British troops went over the top and walked stupidly into a hail of bullets. In many places they used Russian saps, or covered as much ground as possible crawling, or advanced under cover of smoke. It is true that in many places, at first, they did as ordered and went over the top across No Man's Land at a walk. However, when the machine guns opened up, after a short time of surprise, they adopted the rush/hide techniques of the French and many other tactics of trench attack.
Not all Generals sat out the battle in chateau 50 miles behind the lines.
Not all the Generals were careless of the lives of their soldiers, many taking decisions contrary to their orders so they could stop the slaughter of their men.
Not all the casualties were the 'New Army' of Pals Battalions. Three of the 5 worst-hit Divisions (29th, 8th, 4th) were in fact old units of the Regular Army, who showed themselves just as brave as the volunteers of the New Army.

The three major causes of the disaster seem to have been:
Inadequate artillery - particularly using too few HE shells (so that too many German deep dugouts/machine-gun emplacements survived - the key element) and too many shrapnel shells (which failed to cut the wire adequately). Where the artillery had done its job properly, the British attacks were successful.
Poor communications, which led to Battalions advancing too fast, or charging hopeless causes at great loss, and poor coordination of the attacks with the artillery fire.
The failure of the Generals to act on information coming back from the line.

Lees verder:
http://www.johndclare.net/wwi2_FirstDay_map.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 10:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Foto's Somme 1 juli 1916
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=3903
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 10:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

http://www.iwm.org.uk/upload/wmv/Clip_6b.wmv

Hawthorn Ridge crater

One of the enduring images of the Somme is the detonation of the massive mine under the German trenches on Hawthorn Ridge. The crater is still there, although it is now overgrown. The mine contained 40,000lbs of explosive (approximately 18 tonnes).
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 10:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

From the Frontline: Somme 1916
Brigadier General CHT Lucas was CO of the 87th Brigade on the Somme. An Old Contemptible and Captain in the BEF, he had spent 1915 in the Dardanelles. This blog is made up of his Diary entries and letters written in the Summer of 1916. These are his words, published on the corresponding day as when they were written in 1916. 'New' WW1 primary sources such as these are few and far between.

War Diary Entry: July 1st 1916
Quote:
he bombardment began again early & became more intense. At 7.20am the mine under Hawthorn Redoubt went up. As this mine contained 20 tons of ammonal (4 times larger than any single mine we have put up during the war) everyone cleared out of our dugouts in that part of the line. It made quite a good show, masses of earth going up in the air. The crater was immediately rushed by a party of 86th brigade.



After the explosion our Brigade began to file out of the trenches and form up in no man's land. A certain amount of machine gun fire was at once opened on them. At 730am the barrage lifted and the whole line advanced on the german 1st line, while the reserve companies moved forward out of our trenches. Very heavy machine gun fire was immediately opened on them. It looked as though a number of our people (the SWB on the left & RIF on the right of the line in the front line) were pushing through their frontline. One party of RIF were seen to place their bridge over the German 1st line, look down into the trench and then pass on. About 10 minutes later the 2 reserve battns (Borders on the left and KOSBs on the right) moved out of our 2nd & 3rd lines and advanced across the open swept by machine gun fire. About 745am flares began to go up in the Station Road. As this was the signal that the leading troops had reached their objective, things looked quite satisfactory. It was then seen that a number of Germans were still in their front line showing themselves and shooting at the men lying out in no mans land.


http://somme95.blogspot.com/2011/07/war-diary-entry-july-1st-1916.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 10:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1976 BBC documentary: the Battle of the Somme

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=23092
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 10:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

WOI Links Somme
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=9647
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2011 10:27    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Somme, 1 Juli 1916.

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=2999
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Nov 2011 10:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Somme: From Defeat to Victory
Quote:
The 1st of July 1916 was the bloodiest day in British military history. But there was much more to the Somme than senseless slaughter. The Somme: From Defeat to Victory challenges the traditional view of the battle as a disaster and reveals how it was on the Somme that the British Army learnt to fight a modern war.

Two months after the failure of 1st of July, Lt. Colonel Francis Maxwell, a maverick battalion commander, led a daring raid on the German positions where Mellor, Fiddes, and Sharples had been killed. The fighting was savage, but with the help of innovative tactics, such as the ‘creeping barrage’, and a new-fangled weapon, one of the first ever tanks, they eventually defeated their German enemy. Private Edwards who couldn’t even write or read won the Victoria Cross for his heroics and Maxwell was promoted to command a brigade.


http://wardocumentaryfilms.com/browse/world-war-1/the-somme-from-defeat-to-victory/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Nov 2011 10:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Time Team: The Somme’s Secret Weapon
Tony Robinson joins a unique dig near Mametz on the frontline of the Somme battlefield, where he uncovers British trenches with all their remnants of life and death from nearly a century ago. In the half-light of dawn, during World War I, a small metal nozzle pushed its way up through the ground in No Man’s Land to point at the German front line.


http://wardocumentaryfilms.com/browse/world-war-1/time-team-the-sommes-secret-weapon/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 01 Jul 2012 7:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Matthew Copse
by John William Streets (killed and missing in action on 1st July 1916 aged 31)

Once in thy secret close, now almost bare,
Peace yielded up her bountiful largess;
The dawn dropp'd sunshine thro' thy leafy dress;
The sunset bathed thy glade with beauty rare.

Spring once wove here her tapestry of flowers,
The primrose sweet, the errant celandine;
The blue-bell and the wild rose that doth twine
Its beauty 'round the laughing summer hours.

Here lovers stole unseen at deep'ning eve,
High-tide within their hearts, love in their eyes,
And told a tale whose magic never dies
That only they who love can quite believe.

Now 'mid thy splinter'd trees the great shells crash,
The subterranean mines thy deeps divide;
And men from Death and Terror there do hide -
Hide in thy caves from shrapnel's deadly splash.

Yet 'mid thy ruins, shrine now desolate,
The Spring breaks thro' and visions many a spot
With promise of the wild-rose - tho' belate -
And the eternal blue forget-me-not.

So Nature flourishes amid decay,
Defiant of the fate that laid her low;
So Man in triumph scorning Death below
Visions the springtide of a purer day:

Dreams of the day when rampant there will rise
The flowers of Truth and Freedom from the blood
Of noble youth who died: when there will bud
The flower of Love from human sacrifice.

There by the fallen youth, where heroes lie,
Close by each simple cross the flowers will spring,
The bonnes enfants will wander in Spring,
And lovers dream those dreams that never die.


http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/john-william-streets-matthew-copse.htm
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