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De Verdediging van Luik, 4/5 augustus 1914

 
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2008 9:57    Onderwerp: De Verdediging van Luik, 4/5 augustus 1914 Reageer met quote

De Verdediging van Luik, De gevechten van 4 & 5 Augustus

Bron: De Legerbode n° 662 10 Augustus 1919





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Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"


Laatst aangepast door Paddy op 25 Mei 2008 10:03, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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Woonplaats: Idiot Trench, Dendermonde

BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2008 10:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote




_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"


Laatst aangepast door Paddy op 21 Feb 2011 7:00, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Mei 2008 10:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote




Wink
_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Sep 2008 21:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De verdediging van Visé

De Legerbode n°773, 1 december 1921







_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Sep 2008 21:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Een paar heroďsche prentkaarten passen bij bovenstaande schrijfstijl.




_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"
Naar boven
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Sep 2008 21:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Iets realistischer








_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"
Naar boven
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Paddy



Geregistreerd op: 9-11-2007
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Woonplaats: Idiot Trench, Dendermonde

BerichtGeplaatst: 20 Sep 2008 8:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Diary from General Leman's Prison at Magdeburg

On the 11th the Germans started bombarding us with 7 and 10 centimetre cannon. On the 12th and 13th they brought their 21 centimetre guns into action. But it was not until the 14th that they opened their heaviest fire and began their destruction of the outer works.

On that day, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, a German officer approached to within 200 yards of the fort with a signalling flag in his hand; and shortly afterwards, the siege gunners, having adjusted their range, began a fearful firing, that lasted a couple of hours. The battery on the left slope was destroyed, the enemy keeping on pounding away exclusively with their 21-centimeter cannons.

The third phase of the bombardment began at 5 o'clock in the morning of the 15th, firing being kept up without a break until two in the afternoon. A grenade wrecked the arcade under which the general staff were sheltering. All light was extinguished by the force of the explosion, and the officers ran the risk of asphyxiation by the horrible gases emitted from the shell.

When firing ceased, I ventured out on a tour of inspection on the external slopes, which I found had been reduced to a rubble heap. A few minutes later, the bombardment was resumed. It seemed as though all the German batteries were together firing salvoes.

Nobody will ever be able to form any adequate idea of what the reality was like. I have only learned since that when the big siege mortars entered into action they hurled against us shells weighing 1,000 kilos (nearly a ton), the explosive force of which surpasses anything known hitherto. Their approach was to be heard in an acute buzzing; and they burst with a thunderous roar, raising clouds of missiles, stones, and dust.

After some time passed amid these horrors, I wished to return to my observation tower; but I had hardly advanced a few feet into the gallery when a great blast passed by, and I was thrown violently to the ground. I managed to rise, and continued my way, only to be stopped by a choking cloud of poisonous gas.

It was a mixture of the gas from an explosion and the smoke of a fire in the troop quarters. We were driven back, half-suffocated. Looking out of a peephole, I saw to my horror that the fort had fallen, slopes and counter-slopes being a chaos of rubbish, while huge tongues of flame were shooting forth from the throat of the fortress.

My first and last thought was to try and save the remnant of the garrison. I rushed out to give orders, and saw some soldiers, whom I mistook for Belgian gendarmes. I called them, then fell again. Poisonous gases seemed to grip my throat as in a vice.

On recovering consciousness, I found my aide-de-camp, Captain Colland, standing over me, also a German officer, who offered me a glass of water. They told me I had swooned, and that the soldiery I had taken for Belgian gendarmes were, in fact, the first band of German troops who had set foot inside the forts.

In recognition of our courage, the Germans allowed me to retain my sword.

Source: Source Records of the Great War, Vol. II, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923

http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/lemandiary.htm
_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"
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Paddy



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BerichtGeplaatst: 20 Sep 2008 8:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Primary Documents: The Fall of Liege - A German Officer's Letter, August 1914


Reproduced below is the text of a letter written by a German officer in the aftermath of the fall of Liege in Belgium.

The unnamed officer's letter dealt with the 'noble' and 'tragic' defence of Liege as led by Belgian General Gerard Leman.

Leman, who had both legs crushed during the defence of Liege, and who was finally carried from the fallen forts unconscious on a stretcher, subsequently wrote to King Albert I that he would rather have died than surrender the forts.

In the aftermath of the fall, Leman attempted - as was custom - to hand over his ceremonial sword to the conquering German General von Emmich. The latter declined the offer, observing that it was an 'honour' to have fought against the valiant Leman.

The Fall of Liege - Letter from a German Officer, August 1914


General Leman's defence of Liege combined all that is noble, all that is tragic.

The commander of one fort (note: not Leman), at the moment when the bombardment was heaviest, went mad, and shot his own men. He was disarmed and bound. The cupola of another fort was destroyed by a bomb from a Zeppelin. Other forts were swept away like sand castles on the seashore before the relentless waves of the oncoming tide.

As long as possible General Leman inspected the forts daily to see that everything was in order. By a piece of falling masonry, dislodged by our guns, both General Leman's legs were crushed.

Undaunted, he visited the forts in an automobile. Fort Chaudfontein was destroyed by a German shell dropping in the magazine. In the strong Fort Loncin General Leman decided to hold his ground or die.

When the end was inevitable the Belgians disabled the last three guns and exploded the supply of shells kept by the guns in readiness. Before this, General Leman destroyed all plans, maps and papers relating to the defences. The food supplies were also destroyed.

With about 100 men, General Leman attempted to retire to another fort, but we had cut off their retreat. By this time our heaviest guns were in position, and a well-placed shell tore through the cracked and battered masonry and exploded in the main magazine. With a thunderous crash the mighty walls of the fort fell. Pieces of stone and concrete twenty-five cubic metres in size were hurled into the air.

When the dust and fumes passed away, we stormed the fort across ground literally strewn with the bodies of the troops who had gone out to storm the fort and never returned. All the men in the fort were wounded, and most were unconscious. A corporal with one arm shattered valiantly tried to drive us back by firing his rifle.

Buried in the debris and pinned beneath a massive beam was General Leman.

"Respectes le general, it est mort," said an aide-de-camp.

With gentleness and care, which showed they respected the man who had resisted them so valiantly and stubbornly, our infantry released the general's wounded form and carried him away. We thought him dead, but he recovered consciousness, and, looking around, said, "It is as it is. The men fought valiantly," and then, turning to us, added: "Put in your dispatches that I was unconscious."

We brought him to our commander, General von Emmich, and the two generals saluted. We tried to speak words of comfort, but he was silent - he is known as the silent general. "I was unconscious. Be sure and put that in your dispatches." More he would not say.

Extending his hand, our commander said: "General, you have gallantly and nobly held your forts." General Leman replied: "I thank you. Our troops have lived up to their reputations."

With a smile he added: "War is not like manoeuvres" - a reference to the fact that General von Emmich was recently with General Leman during the Belgian manoeuvres. Then, unbuckling his sword, General Leman tendered it to General von Emmich.

"No," replied the German commander, with a bow, "keep your sword. To have crossed swords with you has been an honour," and the fire in General Leman's eye was dimmed by a tear.

Source: Source Records of the Great War, Vol. II, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923

http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/fallofliege.htm
_________________
Greetings from a Little Gallant Belgian:-)
Patrick De Wolf
http://ablhistoryforum.be/

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".
"We're doomed, I tell ye!"
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jurgen



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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Jun 2011 17:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Jun 2011 17:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

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BerichtGeplaatst: 26 Jun 2011 17:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Jun 2011 16:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

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