Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

6 Mei

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2006 23:18    Onderwerp: 6 Mei Reageer met quote

May 6

1915 Second Battle of Krithia, Gallipoli

After a first attempt to capture the village of Krithia, on the Gallipoli Peninsula, failed on April 28, 1915, a second is initiated on May 6 by Allied troops under the British commander Sir Aylmer Hunter-Weston.

Fortified by 105 pieces of heavy artillery, the Allied force advanced on Krithia, located at the base of the flat-topped hill of Achi Baba, starting at noon on May 6. The attack was launched from a beach head on Cape Helles, where troops had landed on April 25 to begin the large-scale land invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula after a naval attack on the Dardanelles failed miserably in mid-March. Since the first failed attempt on the village, Hunter-Weston’s original force had been joined by two brigades of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) to bring the total number of men to 25,000. They were still outnumbered, however, by the Turkish forces guarding Krithia, which were under the direct command of the German Major-General Erich Weber. Weber had been promoted from the rank of colonel after supervising the closure and mining of the Dardanelles six months earlier.

Facing superior enemy numbers and suffering from a shortage of ammunition, the Allies were able to advance some 600 yards, but failed to capture either Krithia or the crest of Achi Baba after three attempts in three days. Hunter-Weston’s troops suffered heavy losses, with a total of 6,000 casualties. Two British naval brigades engaged in the battle saw half their number, some 1,600 soldiers, killed or wounded.

The British regional commander in chief, Sir Ian Hamilton, after pushing for more supplies and ammunition, ordered Hunter-Weston to continue the pressure on Achi-Baba; a third attack on the ridge was launched in early June. As heavy casualties continued to be sustained across the region, with little real gains for the Allies, it became clear that the Gallipoli operation—an Allied attempt to break the stalemate on the Western Front by achieving a decisive victory elsewhere—had failed to achieve its ambitious aims.

http://www.historychannel.com
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 14:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1915
Western Front

Second Battle of Ypres: British recover some trenches on Hill 60.

Eastern Front

Austrians occupy Tarnow (Galicia).

Southern Front

Dardanelles: Second battle of Krithia begins.

Naval and Overseas Operations

Mr. Harcourt makes a statement as to poisoning of wells by Germans in south-west Africa.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 14:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1916
Western Front

Battle of Verdun: Continued struggle for Hill 304.

Asiatic and Egyptian Theatres

Russians occupy Serin el Kerind (Persia).

Naval and Overseas Operations

Belgians occupy Kigali (German East Africa).
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 14:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1917
Western Front

French successfully resist all German counter-attacks on the Aisne: 29,000 prisoners taken by French since 10 April.

Third big German counter-attack near Souchez River (Lens) unsuccessful.

Southern Front

Violent artillery actions on Trentino and Julian front.

Political, etc.

Mass meeting at Salonika demands deposition of King Constantine.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 14:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1918
Western Front

French repulse raids south of Locre.

Eastern Front

Russian ships bombard Germans in Mariupol Harbour (Azov).

Russian Black Sea Fleet arrives at Odessa, surrenders to local authorities.

Asiatic and Egyptian Theatres

Turko-German delegates arrive at Batum to negotiate peace with Georgia.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 14:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1919
Aftermath of War

No news reported.
http://www.firstworldwar.com/onthisday/may.htm
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 14:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Report of Commission to Determine War Guilt, 6 May 1919
The Commission on the Responsibility of the Authors of the War and on Enforcement of Penalties was instituted at the plenary session of the Paris Peace Conference of 25 January 1919. Its purpose was to formally assign war guilt, a judgement that inevitably saw blame fully attributed to the Central Powers.

The commission was comprised of two representatives from each of the five main Allied powers - the U.S., Britain, France, Italy and Japan - and one from Belgium, Greece, Poland, Romania and Serbia. Robert Lansing was selected as its chairman.

The commission's two conclusions briefly summarised the findings of the report, in particular the first, i.e.: "The war was premeditated by the Central Powers together with their Allies, Turkey and Bulgaria, and was the result of acts deliberately committed in order to make it unavoidable".

The key first chapter of the commission's report, which was accepted at the Paris Peace Conference on 6 May 1919, is reproduced below.

On the question of the responsibility of the authors of the war, the Commission, after having examined a number of official documents relating to the origin of the World War, and to the violations of neutrality and of frontiers which accompanied its inception, has determined that the responsibility for it lies wholly upon the Powers which declared war in pursuance of a policy of aggression, the concealment of which gives to the origin of this war the character of a dark conspiracy against the peace of Europe.

This responsibility rests first on Germany and Austria, secondly on Turkey and Bulgaria. The responsibility is made all the graver by reason of the violation by Germany and Austria of the neutrality of Belgium and Luxemburg, which they themselves had guaranteed. It is increased, with regard to both France and Serbia, by the violation of their frontiers before the declaration of war.

Premeditation of the War: Germany and Austria
Many months before the crisis of 1914 the German Emperor had ceased to pose as the champion of peace. Naturally believing' in the overwhelming superiority of his Army, he openly showed his enmity towards France. General von Moltke said to the King of the Belgians: "This time the matter must be settled." In vain the King protested. The Emperor and his Chief of Staff remained no less fixed In their attitude.

On the 28th of June, 1914, occurred the assassination at Sarajevo of the heir-apparent of Austria. "It is the act of a little group of mad-men," said Francis Joseph. The act, committed as it was by a subject of Austria-Hungary on Austro-Hungarian territory, could in no wise compromise Serbia, which very correctly expressed its condolences and stopped public rejoicings in Belgrade.

If the Government of Vienna thought that there was any Serbian complicity, Serbia was ready to seek out the guilty parties. But this attitude failed to satisfy Austria and still less Germany, who, after their first astonishment had passed, saw in this royal and national misfortune a pretext to initiate war.

At Potsdam a "decisive consultation" took place on the 5th of July, 1914. Vienna and Berlin decided upon this plan: "Vienna will send to Belgrade a very emphatic ultimatum with a very short limit of time."

The Bavarian Minister, von Lerchenfeld, said in a confidential dispatch dated the 18th of July, 1914, the facts stated in which have never been officially denied: "It is clear that Serbia cannot accept the demands, which are inconsistent with the dignity of an independent state."

Count Lerchenfeld reveals in this report that, at the time it was made, the ultimatum to Serbia had been jointly decided upon by the Governments of Berlin and Vienna; that they were waiting to send It until President Poincare and Mr. Viviani should have left for St. Petersburg; and that no illusions were cherished, either at Berlin or Vienna, as to the consequences which this threatening measure would involve. It was perfectly well known that war would be the result.

The Bavarian Minister explains, moreover, that the only fear of the Berlin Government was that Austria-Hungary might hesitate and draw back at the last minute, and that on the other hand Serbia, on the advice of France and Great Britain, might yield to the pressure put upon her. Now, "the Berlin Government considers that war is necessary." Therefore, it gave full powers to Count Berchtold, who instructed the Ballplatz on the 18th of July, 1914, to negotiate with Bulgaria to induce her to enter into an alliance and to participate in the war.

In order to mask this understanding, it was arranged that the Emperor should go for a cruise in the North Sea, and that the Prussian Minister of War should go for a holiday, so that the Imperial Government might pretend that events had taken it completely by surprise.

Austria suddenly sent Serbia an ultimatum that she had carefully prepared in such a way as to make it impossible to accept. Nobody could be deceived; "the whole world understands that this ultimatum means war." According to Mr. Sazonoff, "Austria-Hungary wanted to devour Serbia."

Mr. Sazonov asked Vienna for an extension of the short time limit of forty-eight hours given by Austria to Serbia for the most serious decision in its history. Vienna refused the demand. On the 24th and 25th of July, England and France multiplied their efforts to persuade Serbia to satisfy the Austro-Hungarian demands. Russia threw in her weight on the side of conciliation.

Contrary to the expectation of Austria-Hungary and Germany, Serbia yielded. She agreed to all the requirements of the ultimatum, subject to the single reservation that, in the Judicial Inquiry which she would commence for the purpose of seeking out the guilty parties, the participation of Austrian officials would be kept within the limits assigned by International law. "If the Austro-Hungarian Government is not satisfied with this," Serbia declared she was ready "to submit to the decision of the Hague Tribunal."

"A quarter of an hour before the expiration of the time limit," at 5:45 on the 25th, Mr. Pashitch, the Serbian Minister for Foreign Affairs, delivered this reply to Baron Giesl, the Austro-Hungarian Minister.

On Mr. Pashitch's return to his own office he found awaiting him a letter from Baron Giesl saying that he was not satisfied with the reply. At 6:30 the latter had left Belgrade, and even before he had arrived at Vienna, the Austro-Hungarian Government had handed his passports to Mr. Yovanovitch, the Serbian Minister, and had prepared thirty-three mobilization proclamations, which were published on the following morning in the Budapesti Kozloni, the official gazette of the Hungarian Government.

On the 27th Sir Maurice de Bunsen telegraphed to Sir Edward Grey: "This country has gone wild with Joy at the prospect of war with Serbia." At midday on the 28th Austria declared war on Serbia. On the 29th the Austrian army commenced the bombardment of Belgrade, and made its dispositions to cross the frontier.

The reiterated suggestions of the Entente Powers with a view to finding a peaceful solution of the dispute only produced evasive replies on the part of Berlin or promises of intervention with the Government of Vienna without any effectual steps being taken.

On the 24th of July Russia and England asked that the Powers should be granted a reasonable delay in which to work in concert for the maintenance of peace. Germany did not join in this request.

On the 25th of July Sir Edward Grey proposed mediation by four Powers (England, France, Italy and Germany). France and Italy immediately gave their concurrence. Germany refused, alleging that it was not a question of mediation but of arbitration, as the conference of the four Powers was called to make proposals, not to decide.

On the 26th of July Russia proposed to negotiate directly with Austria. Austria refused.

On the 27th of July England proposed a European conference. Germany refused.

On the 29th of July Sir Edward Grey asked the Wilhelmstrasse to be good enough to "suggest any method by which the influence of the four Powers could be used together to prevent a war between Austria and Russia." She was asked herself to say what she desired. Her reply was evasive.

On the same day, the 29th of July, the Czar dispatched to the Emperor William II a telegram suggesting that the Austro-Serbian problem should be submitted to the Hague Tribunal. This suggestion received no reply. This important telegram does not appear in the German White Book. It was made public by the Petrograd Official Gazette "January, 1915).

The Bavarian Legation, in a report dated the 31st of July, declared its conviction that the efforts of Sir Edward Grey to preserve peace would not hinder the march of events.

As early as the 21st of July German mobilization had commenced by the recall of a certain number of classes of the reserve, then of German officers in Switzerland, and finally of the Metz garrison on the 25th of July. On the 26th of July the German fleet was called back from Norway.

The Entente did not relax its conciliatory efforts, but the German Government systematically brought all its attempts to nought. When Austria consented for the first time on the 31st of July to discuss the contents of the Serbian note with the Russian Government and the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador received orders to "converse" with the Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Germany made any negotiation impossible by sending her ultimatum to Russia.

Prince Lichnowsky wrote that "a hint from Berlin would have been enough to decide Count Berchtold to content himself with a diplomatic success and to declare that he was satisfied with the Serbian reply, but this hint was not given. On the contrary they went forward towards war."

On the 1st of August the German Emperor addressed a telegram to the King of England containing the following sentence: "The troops on my frontier are, at this moment, being kept back by telegraphic and telephonic orders from crossing the French frontier." Now, war was not declared till two days after that date, and as the German mobilization orders were issued on that same day, the 1st of August, it follows that, as a matter of fact, the German Army had been mobilized and concentrated in pursuance of previous orders.

The attitude of the Entente nevertheless remained still to the very end so conciliatory that, at the very time at which the German fleet was bombarding Libau, Nicholas II gave his word of honour to William II that Russia would not undertake any aggressive action during the pourparlers, and that when the German troops commenced their march across the French frontier Mr. Viviani telegraphed to all the French Ambassadors "we must not stop working for accommodation."

On the 3rd of August Mr. von Schoen went to the Qual d'Orsay with the declaration of war against France. Lacking a real cause of complaint, Germany alleged, in her declaration of war, that bombs had been dropped by French airplanes in various districts in Germany. This statement was entirely false. Moreover, it was either later admitted to be so or no particulars were ever furnished by the German Government.

Moreover, In order to be manifestly above reproach, France was careful to withdraw her troops ten kilometres from the German frontier. Notwithstanding this precaution, numerous officially established violations of French territory preceded the declaration of war.

The provocation was so flagrant that Italy, herself a member of the Triple Alliance, did not hesitate to declare that in view of the aggressive character of the war the casus foederis ceased to apply.

Conclusions
1. The war was premeditated by the Central Powers together with their Allies, Turkey and Bulgaria, and was the result of acts deliberately committed in order to make it unavoidable.

2. Germany, in agreement with Austria-Hungary, deliberately worked to defeat all the many conciliatory proposals made by the Entente Powers and their repeated efforts to avoid war.
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/commissionwarguilt.htm
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant, 6 mei 1915

De oorlog

De Times verneemt dd. 2 dezer uit Sofia, dat ooggetuigen, die Turksche troepen van Adrianopol naar Kesjan hebben zien trekken, daarvan hebben gezegd, dat het voor het meerendeel lieden waren van over de 50 jaar, gekleed in lompen en uitgerust met oud wapentuig. Deze mannen waren in weinig opgewekte stemming; zij marcheerden zonder orde.

Niettegenstaande er in Konstantinopel officieel vreugdebetoon is, bestaat daar een gespannen nerveuze stemming sinds de ontdekking van de Armenische samenzwering. De Duitsche officieren zijn, als zij op straat moeten komen, niet meer in uniform.

http://www.armeensegenocide.info/pub_geschied/de_oorlog_3.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meierijsche Courant, Donderdag 6 Mei 1915.

Valkenswaard. Toen gisteren J. v/d Boogaert, alhier met nog eenige jongens door de velden liep ontdekten zij een ree. Het dier werd door hen gevangen.

http://www.shgv.nl/KrantenArtikelen/1915.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Orson Welles

George Orson Welles (Kenosha (Wisconsin), 6 mei 1915 – Hollywood (Californië), 10 oktober 1985) was een Amerikaans acteur, film- en toneelregisseur en scriptschrijver. Hij was een zeer invloedrijk filmmaker. Welles werd wereldberoemd in 1938 door een radio-uitzending van The War of the Worlds. Tegenwoordig is hij het best bekend van zijn film Citizen Kane, door velen beschouwd als de beste film aller tijden[bron?]. Ondanks de klassiekerstatus van veel van zijn films en de grote naamsbekendheid die hij tegenwoordig geniet, waren de meeste van de door hem geregisseerde films, waaronder Citizen Kane, geen grote successen op commercieel gebied.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orson_Welles
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Endurance-expeditie van Ernest Shackleton - de Rosszeegroep

De Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition had werkelijk alle pech van de wereld. Aan de andere kant van Antarctica zou de Rosszeegroep onder leiding van Aeneas Mackintosh voedseldepots aanleggen waarvan de transcontinentale groep van Shackleton zou kunnen profiteren tijdens hun oversteek. Maar ook hier liep alles anders dan gepland.

De Aurora bereikte begin januari 1915 de McMurdo Sound. Door pakijs was het onmogelijk om tot aan Hut Point door te varen. Het schip meerde dan maar af aan zeeijs, zo'n 15 kilometer van Hut Point.

Einde januari klommen twaalf man op het immense Rossijsplateau om er voedseldepots op te zetten. De twaalf waren Mackintosh, Ernest Joyce, Keith Jack, Irvine Gaze, Ernest Wild (broer van Frank Wild), de jonge priester Arnold Patrick Spencer-Smith, John Cope, Fred Stevens, Ninnis, Victor Hayward, Lionel Hooke en Dick Richards. De laatste zes zouden slechts tot Safety Camp (het eerste voedseldepot op het ijsplateau) meereizen. Met de rest wou Mackintosh koste wat het kost 80° zuiderbreedte bereiken.

Maar de mannen hadden het moeilijk. De sneeuw was te zacht en de honden waren absoluut niet in vorm, waardoor ze nauwelijks vooruit kwamen. Tot overmaat van ramp kregen ze nog met blizzards af te rekenen. Op 10 februari besloot Mackintosh enkel met Joyce, Wild en de beste honden verder te trekken en de rest naar Hut Point terug te sturen. De honden stierven echter met bosjes. De drie mannen hadden last van bevroren ledematen.

Toch slaagden ze in hun opdracht en stonden op 25 maart voor de hut die Robert Scott in 1902 in Hut Point liet bouwen. Enkel Cope, Hayward en Jack waren aanwezig. De rest was door de Aurora opgepikt. Het schip was naar Cape Evans gevaren en had daar vier mannen afgezet: Stevens, Spencer-Smith, Gaze en Richards. Het schip was een beetje verder aan het zeeijs vastgemaakt. Beslist werd het schip als hoofdkwartier te gebruiken en geen voorraden aan land te brengen - een beslissing die dramatische gevolgen zou hebben. Een groepje van vier man zou in de barak op Cape Evans blijven om er wetenschappelijke waarnemingen te verrichten.

Op 6 mei woedde er een storm. Toen de vier mannen aan land de volgende morgen opstonden, merkten ze tot hun ontzetting dat de Aurora, samen met het ijs was verdwenen. Het bleef maar stormen, waardoor ze alle hoop om het schip terug te zien, opgaven. Ze gingen ervan uit dat het met man en muis was vergaan. Op 2 juni slaagden de zes mannen die zich in Hut Point bevonden erin Cape Evans te bereikten. Ze waren nu met zijn tienen en ze zaten in serieuze problemen. Van het schip was geen proviand en kleding aan land gezet. Ook het sleematerieel bevond zich nog grotendeels aan boord. De groep moest hoe dan ook nog voedseldepots gaan aanleggen, anders zou het leven van Shackleton en zijn transcontinentale groep in gevaar komen tijdens de oversteek.

In september werden alle voorraden naar Hut Point overgebracht. Van daaruit vertrokken in november negen man om opnieuw voedseldepots uit te zetten. Ook nu hadden ze het weer tegen. Omdat er nog maar vier honden (Oscar, Con, Gunner en Towser) overbleven, was de tocht zeer uitputtend.

Op 80° zuiderbreedte stuurde Mackintosh Cope, Gaze en Jack terug. Reden hiervoor was dat een van de drie primusbrandertjes het niet meer deed, waardoor ze hun eten niet konden opwarmen en geen ijs konden smelten om drinkbaar water te hebben. Op 18 januari 1916 kreeg Spencer-Smith last van gezwollen benen en zei dat hij niet meer verder kon. Hij stelde voor in een tentje te wachten, terwijl de vijf anderen verder naar het zuiden trokken.

Een week later, toen het vijftal het laatste voedseldepot aan de voet van de Beardmoregletsjer hadden aangelegd, kwamen ze Spencer-Smith terug oppikken, maar hij kon nog steeds niet lopen. Hij werd in een slaapzak op een slede gelegd en voortgetrokken.

Ook Mackintosh en Hayward kregen het moeilijk. Allemaal hadden ze last van scheurbuik, omdat ze al maanden geen vers voedsel hadden gegeten. Tijdens de nacht van 8 op 9 maart zei Spencer-Smith dat hij zich raar voelde. Even later stierf hij. Hij werd in de sneeuw begraven. De groep bereikte drie dagen later Hut Point. Hun opdracht was geslaagd. Ze hadden hun leven gewaagd om voedseldepots achter te laten voor… niemand.

De hut in Hut Point was niet echt comfortabel. Daarom wilden ze naar Cape Evans trekken, waar Stevens, Cope, Gaze en Jack zaten. Misschien hadden zij nieuws over de Aurora. Daarvoor moesten ze evenwel wachten tot het zeeijs stevig genoeg was.

Op 8 mei verlieten Mackintosh en Hayward Hut Point in een poging Cape Evans te bereiken. Ze werden nooit meer terug gezien. Tijdens hun tocht was er een storm opgestoken, die het ijs waarover de twee mannen liepen, naar zee blies. Pas op 15 juli slaagden de anderen erin Cape Evans te bereiken. De zeven mannen werden in januari 1917 door de Aurora, met aan boord Ernest Shackleton, opgepikt.

Op 6 mei 1915 had een blizzard de Aurora uit de McMurdo Sound weggeblazen. Het schip zat vast en dreef mee met het pakijs. De Aurora weerstond, in tegenstelling tot de Endurance, aan de felle druk van het ijs. Pas op 14 maart 1916 kon het zich bevrijden. Het was onmogelijk terug naar de McMurdo Sound te varen. Daarom zette Joseph Stenhouse, die de leiding had, koers naar Nieuw-Zeeland. In december kwam ook Shackleton naar Nieuw-Zeeland om een reddingsoperatie te regelen. Op 10 januari 1917 werden de zeven overlevenden van de Rosszeegroep uit hun benarde situatie gered.

http://www.hetlaatstecontinent.be/geschiedenis/expedities/endurance_rosszeegroep.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

U 20 torpedeert de "Lusitania"

Op 30 april 1915 verliet U 20 kapitein-luitenant de Eems met het volgende bevel, dat eveneens was bestemd voor U 27 en U 30, welke laatste reeds buitengaats was: "Grote Engelse troepentransporten verwacht uit Liverpool, het Kanaal van Bristol en Dartmouth. U 20 en U 27 moeten deze transporten aanvallen. Ze moeten daartoe de kortste route rond Schotland kiezen en de operaties uitvoeren zolang als mogelijk is. U 30 moet naar Dartmouth gaan. Ook koopvaardijschepen mogen niet worden ontzien." U 20 kreeg daarna van de 3de halfflotielje onderzeeboten opdracht positie te kiezen in de Liverpool-Bay.

Op 6 mei werd gepoogd een ongeïdentificeerd stoomschip aan te houden, waarop dit afdraaide. Het schip stopte pas na verscheidene granaattreffers en zette reddingsboten uit, waarna de opvarenden door een vissersboot aan boord werden genomen. Later op de dag werden door U 20 de Engelse stoomschepen Candidate, 5858 t en Centurion, 5945 t getorpedeerd. Maar door de dichte mist en de te verwachten intensieve patrouilles in de Ierse Zee besloot de commandant af te zien van de tocht naar Liverpool, ook al omdat er nog maar voor beperkte tijd brandstof aan boord was. Op 7 mei om 6 uur 's morgens dook U 20 op, nadat de nacht van 6 op 7 mei wegens dichte mist op 24 m diepte was doorgebracht.

http://www.wivonet.nl/U20.htm

De 'Lusitania' 1907 - 1915

Alle dreigementen ten spijt, zette de Lusitania op 1 mei 1915 om hall één 's middags koers naar Liverpool. Vijf dagen later koerste het schip de oorlogszone ten zuidwesten van Ierland binnen. De bekende voorzorgsmaatregelen werden getroffen: de reddingsboten werden in de davits gehangen en van hun dekkleden ontdaan. Op de avond van 6 mei waarschuwde het Britse ministerie van Marine voor onderzeebootactiviteiten in het gebied.

Kapitein William T. Turner trok zich niet veel van de waarschuwingen aan. Hij negeerde de belangrijkste instructies van het ministerie van Marine: maximale snelheid aanhouden, buiten het zicht van heuvelachtige gebieden blijven, het midden van de vaargeul houden en een zigzagkoers volgen. In plaats daarvan voer hij met een snelheid van 18 knopen vlak onder de kust, nog geen kilometer verwijderd van het lichtschip de Coningbeg, in een gebied waar onderzeeboten gesignaleerd waren. Bovendien maakte hij, door een rechte koers te volgen, zijn schip tot een makkelijk doelwit.

http://home.scarlet.be/johnny.bonte18/teksten/scheepsrampen/ramp_lusitania.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GESNEUVELDEN ACHEL WO-1

Petrus Verweyen: 22 jaar
Was de eerste Achelse soldaat die sneuvelde aan het IJzerfront. Werd meermaals gewond en op 6 mei 1915 dodelijk getroffen door een schrapnel. Hij werd ook meermaals postuum gedecoreerd en ligt begraven in Steenkerke bij Veurne. Geboren te Achel op 8 februari 1893.

http://www.grevenbroekmuseum.be/NL/gesneuv_achel_WO1.shtml
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De olie- en houtzaagmolen van Nijdam, gebouwd in 1877

Een grote brand betekende het einde van de Nijdam molen

Nieuwsblad van Friesland 6 mei 1915:
’t Liep gisteravond tegen tienen en ons dorp lag als haast met geloken oogen, toen brandgeroep de rust plotseling verstoorde. Uit den olie- en houtzaagmolen van den heer G.H. Nijdam, staande iets ten oosten van de dorpsstraat, sloegen de vlammen. In korte spanne tijds stond de geheele, grotendeels van hout opgetrokken oude molen in lichter laaie. In den aanwezigen voorraad olie vond het vuur gretig voedsel. Twee aangrenzende woningen, waarvan een als pakhuis voor lijnkoeken werd gebruikt en de ander 1 Mei door de bewoners was ontruimd, vormden spoedig met den molen een geweldige vuurzee. De brand was op verre afstand zichtbaar. Zelfs geheel van Leeuwarden en Heerenveen kwam men opdagen. Van verre geleek het alsof een deel van de dorpsbuurt in brand stond. De hitte was ontzettend; in den beginne kon men daardoor in de dorpsstraat schier niet verkeeren…”

Een ander krantenverslag uit 1915:
Dinsdagavond, circa kwart voor tien werden de inwoners van Irnsum opgeschrikt door het geroep van brand. Een geweldige rookkolom steeg op uit den olie- en houtzaagmolen van den heer G. Nijdam en spoedig daarna baanden de vlammen zich een uitweg naar buiten. Weldra stond de molen in lichten laaie. De vlammen vonden ruimschoots voedsel in de 70 vaten olie en de 10 à 15 last lijnzaad in den molen aanwezig. De vrij sterke oostelijke wind dreef de vonken door de lucht en bracht de belendende gebouwen in een zeer hachelijke toestand. Inmiddels was de brandspuit aangerukt en kon spoedig water geven. De spuitgasten moesten zich bepalen tot het beveiligen der bedreigde huizen. Tot vier maal toe ontstond er begin van brand en in het blok huizen bewoond door de wed. Van Dijk e.a. De E.A. Heer Burgemeester van Rauwerderhem was ook spoedig op de plaats des onheils aanwezig. De gemeente-politie was versterkt met Rijkspolitie en marechaussee. Hoog en hooger laaiden de vlammen op en deden de brand op zeer grooten afstand zichtbaar worden. Van heinde en ver stroomden nieuwsgierigen per fiets of auto toe. Gelukkig slaagde de wakkere brandweer er in de belendende gebouwen voor het gevaar te behoeden en was de tusschenkomst der twee gereedstaande spuiten uit Grouw onnoodig. Gelukkig ja, want waren die gebouwen in brand geraakt, de ramp ware niet te overzien geweest. Ongeveer vijf uur in den morgen was het gevaar geweken en kon de spuit inrukken. De oorzaak van de brand is onbekend. Tot zeven uur in den avond had men in den molen gewerkt. De molen was in 1877 door den heer Nijdam en diens vader opgericht. Voor eenige jaren was hij vernieuwd en was er ook electrische drijfkracht in aangebracht, zoodat hij door wind en electriciteit beide, gedreven kon worden. Dinsdag had men den ganschen dag met wind gemalen. De molen was verzekerd bij de Onderlinge Brandwaarborgmaatschappij te Wirdum. Olie en zaad bij de Onderlinge Verzekeringsmaatschappij “De Nijverheid” te Leeuwarden.

http://www.irnsum.nl/irnsum_124.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 05 Mei 2010 21:29, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Armand Roblot

In de weken na het eerste contact hebben wij van Mademoiselle Roblot kopieën gekregen van nogal wat oorlogsdocumenten van haar vader Armand Roblot. Tientallen bladzijden over zijn oorlogswedervaren, vele jaren later neergepend op verzoek van een kleindochter, en brieven gestuurd tijdens zijn verblijf in Boezinge naar een oom en tante. En daaruit resumeren wij :

Armand Roblot werd geboren nabij Parijs op 16 mei 1890. Zijn militaire dienstplicht (1911 - okt. 13) voltooide hij als sergeant en hij keerde terug naar zijn ouderlijk huis Epinay-sur-Orge (17 km ten zuiden van Parijs). Wanneer begin augustus 1914 de oorlog uitbreekt, wordt hij gemobiliseerd, en voegt zich bij zijn eenheid (2de Bataljon Zouaven) in Rosny-sous-Bois (bij Parijs). Vier bataljons Zouaven trekken richting België, en lijden midden augustus 1914 zware verliezen nabij Charleroi. Ze trekken zich zuidwestelijk terug, richting Parijs, worden midden september ingezet op de Chemin des Dames.

Begin oktober 1914 bevindt Armand Roblot zich met zijn eenheid aan de spoorlijn Nieuwpoort - Diksmuide (periode van de onderwaterzetting van de IJzervlakte). Begin november trekt zijn eenheid zuidwaarts, 9 km ten zuiden van Ieper (St.-Elooi, halfweg Ieper - Wijtschate). Tijdens een nachtelijke patrouille wordt hij ernstig gewond : "Ik zakte ineen op mijn knieën en voelde dat ik ernstig geraakt was door een kogel, want meteen stroomde het bloed van mijn lendenen over mijn dijen en billen. Gelukkig was ik niet in het hoofd geraakt. Ik trok me achteruit en sleepte mijn been over de grond."

Gewond wordt hij via Duinkerke, Le Havre naar een hospitaal bij Parijs gebracht. Een kleine maand later voegt hij zich weer bij het dépôt van de Zouaven in Rosny en wordt onderluitenant. Eind april gaat het weer richting westelijk front, via Duinkerke. In een brief van 27 april 1915 luidt het (in vertaling) : "Ik ben gehaast om het front terug te zien." Op 22 april 1915 is immers bij Ieper weer de hel losgebarsten (de Duitse chloorgasaanval). Eerst verblijft hij twee weken in Sockx, een dorpje aan de Franse grens, ten zuiden van St.-Winoksbergen, en schrijft hij op 6 mei 1915 : "Je serais content de repartir pour le front, car je me ferais honte de moi-même."

http://www.wo1.be/ned/geschiedenis/gastbijdragen/2007/HandBoezinge/welkom.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Stijn Streuvels, In oorlogstijd. Het volledige dagboek van de Eerste Wereldoorlog

6 mei 1916

[Krantenknipsel]:

Het Volk
Duitse Mededelingen en Verordeningen.
Bekendmaking

De Belgen Alfons Vandenberghe en Gustaaf Leroy, te Ingooigem, hebben niet volgens A.O.K. decreet van 3.5.'15 vier hun toebehorende duiven afgeleverd, maar ze levend verstoken4 achtergehouden. Bij gelegenheid van huiszoeking vond een militaire patroelje die duiven op 22.12.'15.

De overtreding van het duivenverbod was onontdekt gebleven, wijl vanwege het gemeentebestuur nooit huiszoekingen naar duiven in de gemeente Ingooigem gedaan waren.

Voor dit plichtverzuim is op last van het opper-legercommando 4 aan de gemeente Ingooigem een dwangstraf als boet ten bedrage van drie duizend mark opgelegd geworden.

Dit brengt ter openbare kennis,
V.S.d.E.I.
De Overste van de Generaalstaf,
OSTERTAG,
Oberstleutnant.
Gent, de 4 mei 1916.

http://www.dbnl.org/tekst/stre009inoo02_01/stre009inoo02_01_0021.php
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

GESNEUVELDEN HAMONT WO-1

Hendrik-Theodoor Evers, 23 jaar
Geboren te Hamont op 16 maart 1895. Was amper 19 jaar toen de Eerste Wereldoorlog uitbrak en vertrok als vrijwilliger vanuit Hamont naar het front op 6 mei 1916. Als soldaat van het 4de linieregiment sneuvelde hij tijdens het laatste offensief te Houthulst op 29 september 1918.

http://www.grevenbroekmuseum.be/NL/gesneuv_hamont_WO1.shtml
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Tweede Slag om Bullecourt, 3–15 mei 1917

De Australiërs verbreedden hun nauwe positie aan de Hindenburglinie tot deze er als een paddestoel op een steel uitzag, met de hoed diep in vijandelijk gebied en verbonden aan één lang communicatiepad. Tegen zonsopgang op 6 mei, na een beschieting van 18 uur, lanceerden de Duitsers hun zesde algemene tegenaanval. De Duitsers hadden bijna de centrale weg bereikt, toen korporaal George Julian Howell een verbazingwekkende sprint over de loopgraven maakte, terwijl hij al rennend handgranaten op de vijand gooide. Hierdoor en door de koppige ondersteuning van andere Australiërs moesten de Duitsers zich verder dan hun beginpunt terugtrekken. Howell overleefde het en ontving in eigen persoon het Victoriakruis van Koning George V.

http://www.ww1westernfront.gov.au/nl-be/battlefields/bullecourt-may-1917.html

George Julian Howell

George Julian "Snowy" Howell VC, MM (19 November 1893 – 23 December 1964) was an Australian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest decoration for gallantry "in the face of the enemy" that can be awarded to members of the British and Commonwealth armed forces. Howell was decorated with the Victoria Cross following his actions during the Second Battle of Bullecourt, in which he ran along the parapet of a trench bombing the German forces attacking his position through the use of grenades, and thus driving them back. (...)

Victoria Cross
In preparation for an attack on the Hindenburg Line at Bullecourt, the 1st Australian Brigade—of which the 1st Battalion was part—was attached to the 2nd Australian Division. The attack commenced in the morning of 3 May 1917, with the 2nd Division lined up in conjunction with thirteen other divisions. Despite some progress made early in the attack, the Australian forces were soon held up by strong opposition, and in the evening the 1st Battalion was entrenched in the old German line known as 'OG1'. Three of the battalion's companies occupied the line, while a fourth was placed in reserve. Their position was such that they occupied a wedge into the German line, while two flanks were in German held territory.

From the initial attack, only the Canadians on the extreme right and the 3rd Australian Brigade on the extreme left were able to capture and hold their set objectives. Over the course of the next three days, severe fighting took place and further troops were drawn in to hold and extend the gains of 3 May. On 6 May, the Germans launched a counter-attack which forced the 3rd Brigade to withdraw from their trenches; it was during this engagement that Howell was to perform the act which was to earn him the Victoria Cross.

At 06:00, Howell, who was in charge of a post to the right of the line, noticed the battalion on the right flank was being forced out of its trench and was beginning to retire. Immediately alerting battalion headquarters, Captain Alexander MacKenzie—who had assumed temporary command of the battalion—hurriedly organised a group of non-combatant soldiers from headquarters together with several signallers to form a defensive line along a road bank in order to fend off the expected German advance. A fierce bombing and grenade fight soon ensued, with both sides suffering heavy casualties. Fearing the Germans would outflank his battalion, Howell climbed onto the top of the parapet and began running along the trench line throwing bombs down on the Germans, all the while being subject to heavy rifle and bomb fire. Forcing the Germans back along the trench, Howell was supported by Lieutenant Thomas Richards who followed him along the trench firing bursts from his Lewis Gun. Soon exhusting his supply of bombs, Howell began to attack with his bayonet until he fell into the trench wounded. Howell had been hit in both legs by machine gun fire, and when he was brought into the clearing station some hours later, it was discovered he had suffered at least twenty-eight separate wounds. Due to his actions, the ground which had been lost was soon retaken, and the German attack was later repulsed.

The full citation for Howell's Victoria Cross appeared in a supplement to the London Gazette on 27 June 1917, reading:

War Office, 27th June, 1917.
His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned Officer, Warrant Officer, Non-commissioned Officers and men:—

No. 2445 Cpl. George Julian Howell, Inf. Bn., Aus. Imp. Force.

For most conspicuous bravery. Seeing a party of the enemy were likely to outflank his Battalion, Cpl. Howell, on his own initiative, single-handed and exposed to heavy bomb and rifle fire, climbed on to the top of the parapet and proceeded to bomb the enemy, pressing them back along the trench.

Having exhausted his stock of bombs, he continued to attack the enemy with his bayonet. He was then severely wounded.

The prompt action and gallant conduct of this N C.O. in the face of superior numbers was witnessed by the whole Battalion and greatly inspired them in the subsequent successful counter attack.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Julian_Howell
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 21:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ZIJN BOMENAARS HONDENFRETTERS?

JA, want zowel tijdens de 1ste als tijdens de 2de wereldoorlog werd er in Boom, wegens de heersende hongersnood, hondenvlees gegeten. Dat is in de westerse wereld een ongebruikelijk fenomeen.

Om het te begrijpen beschrijf ik achtereenvolgens:
1. de toestand in de gemeente Boom voor het uitbreken van de 1ste wereldoorlog;
2. de gebeurtenissen tijdens die oorlog:
a) het beleg van Boom;
b) het gemeentebestuur;
c) hulp aan de noodlijdende bevolking;
d) de hondenfretters, met als enig feit in België de officiële installatie van een hondenslachthuis door het gemeentebestuur;
3. het eten van hondenvlees tijdens de 2de wereldoorlog;
4. slotwoord met tekst en muziek van het “ONNEFRETTERSLIED”

Leuke site! En ja, ergens komt de datum 6 mei 1917 voor. http://tenboome.webruimtehosting.net/tenboome/paginas/hondenfretters.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 22:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

William Gregg

William Gregg VC , DCM , MM (27 January 1890 - 10 August 1969) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross (British medal of achievement), the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Details
He was 28 years old, and a sergeant in the 13th Battalion, The Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort's Own), British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 6 May 1918 at Bucquoy, France, when all the officers of Sergeant Gregg's company had been hit during an attack on an enemy outpost, he took command, rushing two enemy posts, killing some of the gun teams, taking prisoners and capturing a machine-gun. He then started to consolidate his position until driven back by a counter-attack, but as reinforcements had by now come up, he led a charge, personally bombed a hostile machine-gun, killed the crew and captured the gun. When driven back again, he led another successful attack and held on to his position until ordered to withdraw.

Further information
He later achieved the rank of company sergeant-major.

The medal
His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Royal Green Jackets Museum (Winchester, England).

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/William_Gregg_(soldier)
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 22:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meierijsche Courant, Dinsdag 6 Mei 1919.

Locaal Spoorweg Tilburg – Valkenswaard
Nadat reeds op 25 Maart te Valkenswaard, onder voorzitterschap van burgemeester Van Hoorn een vergadering van belangstellenden was belegd, inzake een aan te leggen locaal spoorweg van Tilburg naar Valkenswaard, had heden, Dinsdagmorgen 11 uur in hotel Schimmelpenninck, te Eindhoven, opnieuw een vergadering plaats.
Zooals men weet is de lijn geprojecteerd als volgt: De lijn verlaat Tilburg over de baan naar Baarle Nassau. Zij gaat dan over Goirle naar Hilvarenbeek, verder langs Diessen, althans op eenigen afstand, naar Esbeek, Hooge- en Lage Mierde, Reuzel, Bladel, Duizel, Eersel, Luijksgestel, Bergeijk, Dommelen, Riethoven naar Valkenswaard.
De lengte der lijn wordt geschat op 50 K.M., de bouwkosten, na den oorlog op f 80.000 per K.M. De totale bouwsom op f 4.000.000, waarvan door het Rijk bij te dragen 1/3 of f 1.300.00; de provincie f 1.200.000 en de streek de rest, of f 1.500.000. de kosten door de streek te dragen zouden omgeslagen worden op f 25 per H.A., en f 25 per inwoner….

http://www.shgv.nl/KrantenArtikelen/19191.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 22:28    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Helles: The 2nd Australian Brigade and the Second Battle of Krithia
Mark Whitmore (AWM)

In the immediate aftermath of the landings at Helles and Anzac on 25 April 1915, the allied
forces consolidated an increasingly firm foothold on the Gallipoli peninsula. However,
neither landing had reached even the initial objectives. In the south the key objective was
the peak of Achi Baba, which overlooked the whole southern end of the peninsula. A
renewed advance of almost 5 kilometres on 28 April covered less than half the distance
before grinding to a halt under intense Turkish fire and failed to even approach the village of
Krithia at the base of the hill.
General Sir Ian Hamilton, commanding the allied force, lacked sufficient resources to continue
the offensive at both Anzac and Helles and therefore decided to concentrate on the southern
end of the peninsula in a further attempt to capture Achi Baba. In this area the navy could
provide the most effective fire support and there was sufficient space to deploy his artillery.
He therefore sought reinforcements from General Sir William Birdwood, commanding the
ANZAC Corps, who agreed to transfer the New Zealand Infantry Brigade and the 2nd
Australian Brigade, as well as some additional artillery.
Early on 6 May the
Australians disembarked at V
Beach and bivouacked inland
from Morto Bay. The gently
undulating terrain with
cultivated fields contrasted
strongly with the rugged hills
and gullies of the Anzac area.
At 10.30 that morning, while
the Australians rested, a brief
and rather ineffective
bombardment heralded the
start of the renewed offensive
– the second battle of Krithia.
In a familiar pattern, orders
arrived late, the Turkish
positions had not been adequately located and the advance soon bogged down in the face of
intense shrapnel and machine-gun fire. At the end of the day the British and French advance
had not reached, or in most cases even located, the Turkish forward positions, let alone
breaching their main defensive line.

A virtually identical plan was adopted for the following day with a similar lack of progress. The
morning of 8 May saw yet a third unsuccessful attempt to push forward, supported by a very
feeble bombardment due to a severe shortage of artillery shells. By early afternoon it was
clear that the attempt had comprehensively failed. However, Hamilton resolved to make one
final attempt using some troops, including the Australians, who still remained in reserve. He
ordered an advance along the line to commence at 5.30pm, preceded by a fifteen minute
bombardment using as much ammunition as could be spared.
Late in the morning of 8 May the 2nd Australian Brigade, commanded by Colonel J W M’Cay,
had received orders to move up to a reserve position behind the British front facing Krithia.
Around 5pm, as the Australians were just preparing to bivouac for the night, and M’Cay was
away from the Brigade visiting the adjoining New Zealanders, orders arrived for the renewed
attack. They had just half an hour to prepare and advance about 500 metres to the front line,
ready for the attack to commence. Their objective was Achi Baba and they were to advance
straddling the road to Krithia along the top of a spur. M’Cay hurriedly returned and issued
orders for the 6th and 7th Battalions to advance side by side, with the 5th and 8th Battalions
following in support. There was no time for subtlety; they would have to move in daylight
across open ground up to their front line before advancing. In the midst of his preparations
M’Cay received a bizarre call from General Paris who explained that the Commander-in-
Chief wanted as much display as possible. He enquired whether they had any bands or
colours but had to settle for fixed bayonets. The official Australian historian, Dr Charles Bean,
commented afterwards that “…never, I think, in the history of the A.I.F., was an important
attack … started in such haste.”
As the preliminary bombardment opened, and still in a state of some confusion, the
Australians formed up and move briskly forwards, crossing a support trench occupied by
Indian troops. Up to this point the Australians had been hidden from Turkish observation by a
slight depression and a screen of scattered olive trees. Now they emerged onto open
moorland and were in full view. At this moment the British bombardment slackened and it
quickly became very evident that the shelling had not been effective. As the 6th and 7th
Battalions advanced at a rapid walk, salvos of shrapnel burst amongst them and they faced a
growing storm of Turkish rifle fire, despite renewed attempts by the British artillery to provide
covering fire. Some of the men “… half unconsciously, carried his shovel, blade upwards …
as if to ward off the hail which was whistling past …”
The Australians started to suffer casualties well before they reached the British front line,
which had been established on 6 May. For most of the men it was a complete surprise when
they stumbled upon this trench running through the scrub, occupied by a British troops, and
they sank into its protection with relief. M’Cay soon arrived and established a temporary
headquarters. After only a few minutes he scrambled on to the parapet and cried “Now then,
Australians! Which of you men are Australians? Come on, Australians!” In response the
men scrambled over the dry, red parapet into the intense fire and moved forwards. By now
the advance was becoming a series of rushes with little attempt to provide covering fire. The
losses mounted rapidly as they came under fire from the front and both flanks. One
Australian, Private Frank Brent, described how “ … despite the fact that you couldn’t see a
Turk, he was pelting us with everything he’d got from all corners …” The advance ground to a
halt about 500 metres beyond the foremost British trenches, but finally the main Turkish line
could be seen about 400 metres in front, with a skirmish line even closer.
The Australians then dug in and reinforced their hard won gains, and the headquarters moved
up close behind. By late afternoon it was evident that no further advance was possible and
General Paris was advised accordingly.

The 2nd Brigade suffered over 1,000 casualties from a complement of 2,900 men. They had
advanced for 1,000 metres mostly in full view of the Turkish forces, yet half of this distance,
ith heavy losses, had been in simply reaching the British front line. Although the Turkish lines
had finally come into view they had not nearly been reached. Ironically, under cover of
darkness that night, reinforcements from the 8th Battalion moved up with few losses, and the
New Zealanders and naval battalion on each flank also made contact almost without loss.
Many concluded that the advance could have achieved at least the same result, but without
the losses, if it had been undertaken at night. Indeed, it had originally been Hamilton’s
intention to launch a night attack rather than the three days of daylight operations, but he had
accepted the advice of Major General Hunter Weston, commanding the British 29th Division,
that this was not feasible.
Apart from the Australian’s advance, the day ended along the allied line with minimal gains by
the New Zealanders and minor gains by the French, achieved at great cost. Thus ended the
second battle of Krithia in almost unrelieved failure; in three days an army had been
expended in merely approaching the Turkish defences.

For the casualties the battle was not over. It took most of the night to clear the majority of the
wounded from the battlefield and one soldier recorded in his diary
“ … for two nights and a day the wounded were calling. ‘Have you forgotten me cobbers’ and
‘water’.” There were also no vehicles for evacuating them from the advanced dressing station
and stretcher bearers were faced with carrying casualties more than 3 kilometres to W beach.
M’Cay also became a casualty of the battle. Not only was he seriously wounded in the leg by
a stray bullet during the night, but many also concluded that the 2nd Brigade had been
sacrificed needlessly, and held McCay largely responsible. Although the plan was not his, he
did drive his men hard in undertaking a brave but largely futile action.
This battle was the first time in the war that Australians had attacked a deeply entrenched and
well-prepared enemy across open ground. It was a portent of many to come. Sir Ian
Hamilton wrote after the battle “… A young wounded officer of the 29th Division said it was
worth ten years of tennis to see the Australians and New Zealander go in …” Clearly many of
those who took part would not have agreed.
Many of the Australians are buried in The Redoubt Cemetery, which is located on the site of
the Australian action.

References
Austin, R. The White Gurkas: the Australians at the second battle of Krithia, Melbourne, RJ
and SP Austin 1989.
Bean, C.E.W. The Story of Anzac, Vol II of the official history of Australia in the war of 1914 –
1918, Sydney, Angus and Robertson, 1924
Fewster, K (ed). Frontline Gallipoli: C.E.W. Bean’s diary from the trenches, Sydney, Allen
and Unwin, 1983.
Hodges, I. Australians at the 2nd Battle of Krithia, in Wartime Issue 9, Australian War
Memorial, 2000
Steel, N and Hart, P. Defeat at Gallipoli, London, John Murray, 1995


http://www.iwm.org.uk/upload/package/2/gallipoli/pdf_files/Krithia2.pdf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 22:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

H. J. Lynch, 6 May 1915

I will endeavor to give you a fuller account of our experiences whilst landing. I dare say long ere this reaches you, you will have read all about it in the papers, but here is the part I saw and took part in. It was on Sunday, April 25th at 3 a.m., we disembarked from our transport ship, the "Galeka," our kit consisted of an extra change of clothing, 200 rounds of ammunition, as well as plenty of tobacco, the entire lot weighing just on 90 lbs., and with that weight we had to climb down over the side of the ship - per Jacob's ladder, which by the way, is made of rope, - into rowing boats, 50 men in each. We were towed by naval pinnaces as near as possible to the shore, being under very heavy fire made it a very difficult task.
It was on Sunday, April 25th at 3 a.m., we disembarked from our transport ship, the "Galeka," our kit consisted of an extra change of clothing, 200 rounds of ammunition, as well as plenty of tobacco, the entire lot weighing just on 90 lbs., and with that weight we had to climb down over the side of the ship - per Jacob's ladder, which by the way, is made of rope, - into rowing boats, 50 men in each. We were towed by naval pinnaces as near as possible to the shore, being under very heavy fire made it a very difficult task.
Before reaching the shore, a shrapnel shell burst in our boat, blowing the side out of it. Our next move was in the water, and I might add we were neck high in it, some of our boys were unfortunate enough to get wounded while in the water, but after a few moments we were all safely on the shore, the Turks being entrenched forty yards away from us on the side of a cliff, playing shrapnel, machine gun, and rifle fire on us. To stay where we were meant death. None of us wanted to die so early in the game, so we fixed bayonets and with a maddening shout, we charged, and Oh, what a charge, will I ever forget it, and the excitement that prevailed. Those of the Turks that were lucky enough to escape our bayonets will not forget it either, they retired pell mell, our bayonet helping them along a trifle. We drove them back nearly two miles and took up our position, defending the position we had just taken. "Hot job" it was too.

There we lay in the open, no cover, no reinforcements, and a severe fire from the Turks, the time then was about 6.30 a.m. Oh, what a long day it seemed, and what would nightfall bring? Perhaps no change, perhaps a little "Turkish Delight," still we had to hang on. The Turks made repeated counter attacks to drive us back and gain the position they had lost but "nothing doing," we were there to stop, and stop we did. At last night with its long waited for darkness spread over us, the only change being for the worse, as the bullets fell unceasingly, sometimes a few inches to the right, sometimes a few to the left, often ploughing the ground up under your nose. Once or twice I said my turn next, but morning saw me still alive and well. Yes, we were cold, our wet clothes making it more uncomfortable. Monday's program was practically the same. They were sending us leaden presents, and we in return sent them back threefold.

I thought that Hughie Arthur Burn and myself would see another night together unscratched, but no such luck. Arthur Bird got shot through the head and died, sadly missed by both of us. Hughie was the next, he got shot through the arm, and was taken back aboard ship, then I was left without a soul I knew, our battalion being split up in all directions. I did not lose heart, I had too many narrow escapes to be frightened. I wondered how Hughie was and how the rest of our boys were. Hughie and Arthur Bird were the only ones of our battalion that I had seen. After a couple of hours I was joined by another sixth chap named McDonald. We were both very pleased at the meeting, and started conversing on our work and position. We had been talking for about ten minutes when we were joined by two more sixth men, the four of us had about an hour together, when a shell burst right over us, wounding my three mates and smashing my rifle leaving me unharmed.

Tuesday morning I was still going strong, I thought my life was charmed, but about noon I got that little present which had been waiting for me and here I am. I went aboard the hospital ship and saw the last of Len Everret. Poor chap he spoke to me till the last. I have had the bullet extracted and am getting well and fit. I shall get it mounted when I return and wear on my watch chain. Rather a "striking curio."

Note: by Pte. H. J. Lynch writing from Victoria Hospital, Alexandria.
http://www.patriotfiles.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=11
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 22:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

6 May 1915, Commons Sitting

DEATH SENTENCE ON PRIVATE LONSDALE.


HC Deb 06 May 1915 vol 71 c1237 1237

Lord CHARLES BERESFORD asked the Prime Minister whether he can give any information to the House as to the reported sentence of death passed on Private Lonsdale, British prisoner of war in Germany?

The UNDER-SECRETARY Of STATE for War (Mr. Tennant) My right hon. Friend has asked me to answer this question. No information has reached us beyond what is contained in the newspapers. I would also refer the Noble Lord to the written answer I gave yesterday to the hon. Member for South West Ham.

Lord C. BERESFORD Will the right hon. Gentleman get some information. This man's life is in jeopardy.

Mr. TENNANT It is impossible to get information from the German Government. The man's life is dependent entirely on the fiat of the Emperor of Germany.

Lord C. BERESFORD Cannot representations be made to the German Ambassador in Berlin?

Mr. TENNANT He is fully cognisant of the fact. The German Ambassador in Berlin has been communicated with through the Ambassador in London.

Mr. DUNCAN May we expect that if methods like this continue to be pursued in Germany, we shall play the same game here?

Mr. TENNANT That is no part of the policy of the Government.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1915/may/06/death-sentence-on-private-lonsdale

British POWs at Döberitz

The POW camp attracted worldwide press attention after British Private William Lonsdale punched a German guard in November 1914 and was sentenced to death. Lonsdale and 250 fellow captives had failed to assemble quickly enough for the Germans and a general fracas then erupted between British prisoners and the guards. Bowing to international pressure, the death sentence was commuted to 20-years in January 1915, followed by an outright pardon from the Kaiser, seizing the propaganda opportunity.

Mooie foto's van POW-kampen in Duitsland. http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/firstworldwar/ger-zossen-roll-call.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 22:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

James Bryce to Jane Addams, 6 May 1915

This document describes Jane Addams's confinement on a ship in the English Channel due to the fighting in England, illuminating the hazards of the delegates' travel. In an attempt to continue the peace mission, Addams wrote to one of England’s Foreign Ministers, James Bryce, asking for help. Due to frequent delays, such as this one, the American women's funds were depleted rapidly, and their tour concluded sooner than originally planned.

3 Buckingham Gate
S.W.
6th May 1915
Dear Miss Addams,

Just after I had received your letter and while I was inquiring what I could do to comply with the request it contained to secure that your steamer should proceed at Holland, I saw in the newspapers a statement that it had already arrived there and therefore it was needless to demand further action. I hope that you will be able to continue with equal safety. There was fighting in the North and I suppose that it was for the sake of protection from any risks that might arise therefrom that your ship was detained. These perils to neutrals are one of the most distressing features of this horrible war.

Sincerely yours,
James Bryce


http://womhist.alexanderstreet.com/hague/doc7.htm
Zie ook http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Addams
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 23:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

James Connolly, 1916 and the 'blood sacrifice' myth

Peter Berresford Ellis looks at the circumstances surrounding Connolly's participation in the 1916 Easter Rising and challenges the myth of the 'blood sacrifice'

WHEN IT was known that the Irish Marxist and trade union leader, James Connolly, had not only taken part in the insurrection of 1916 but had been named as commander of all the insurgent forces fighting in Dublin as well vice-president of the provisional government, many leaders of the British left professed utter bewilderment.

One leading member of the Labour Party, Tom Johnson (1882-1965), who became a Labour government minister, wrote in his journal Forward on 6 May 1916, of Connolly's role "…it is all a mystery to me," adding "He may, of course, have changed his views."

Other Labour leaders such as Arthur Henderson (1863-1935), secretary of the Labour Party from 1911-1934, and Member of Parliament who, sadly, was a member of the coalition cabinet which approved the execution of Connolly and the other Irish leaders, felt that Connolly had "suddenly… ran amok for bloody revolution".

Connolly, one of the foremost Marxist theoreticians of his day, had neither changed a lifetime of views nor simply "ran amok". Neither was he an advocate of what many historians later tried to claim the 1916 insurrection was - a 'blood sacrifice'. His role in 1916 was the logical progression of his life's work and teachings that had clearly been in print in articles and books written during the twenty years before the event.

Why Johnson found it a mystery is itself a mystery because Connolly had even contributed to Johnson's own magazine. Writing in Forward he declared:

"The internationalism of the future will be based upon the free federation of free peoples and cannot be realised through the subjugation of the smaller by the larger political unit."

He argued that national and social freedom were not two separate and unrelated issues but were two sides of one great democratic principle, each being incomplete without the other.

He had made clear his stand for an independent Irish socialist republic from the outset. He had also made it clear that he was pragmatic enough to understand that, given the circumstances of the time, socialists would have to engage with all the elements that sought a separation from Britain. Socialists, in the anti-colonial struggle, would have to co-operate with other groups to achieve Irish independence.

And writing again in Forward (14 March 1914) he was clear that he did not rule out physical force if Britain continued to refuse to accept the Irish democratic mandate for self-government, which, indeed, they did later that year by shelving the Home Rule Bill.

The growing frustration of the Irish over British 'democracy' was clear for most intelligent observers to see. The Irish Party, holding four-fifths of all Irish seats in Westminster for over 40 years, had made countless attempts to secure Home Rule for Ireland only to see all their efforts thwarted by the majority of English Members of Parliament. Now a Bill that had finally succeeded in being passed was being `shelved' because of Britain's entry into the war.

Connolly had warned: "To my mind an agitation to attain a political or economic end must rest upon an implied willingness and ability to use force. Without that it is mere wind and attitudinising."

In 1913 the Irish Citizen Army had been formed initially as a workers' defence force - the first ever armed and uniformed socialist militia in Europe. Under Connolly, it was organised as an insurrectionary force and even before the other elements of the Irish revolutionary movement were ready, Connolly was considering using the ICA to start an insurrection in the hope that it would spark off a national uprising.

Once again, Connolly had made his intentions clear: "We believe in constitutional action in normal times; we believe in revolutionary action in exceptional times. These are exceptional times."

Were the British Labour leaders listening? Were they bothering to read the articles and books that flowed from his pen? Indeed, were they, like those Labour leaders that came after them, even today, just arrogantly blind to the Irish struggle? Their professed bewilderment, following 1916, seemed to confirm that they were totally indifferent to Ireland's struggle for national and social independence.

The claims that Connolly was some bloodthirsty revolutionary is countered by his article in The Worker (30 January, 1915):

"... there is no such thing as humane or civilised war. War may be forced upon a subject race or subject class to put an end to subjection of race, class or sex. When it is so waged, it must be waged thoroughly and relentlessly, but with no delusion as to its elevating nature, or civilising methods."
When the poet and educationalist Pádraic Pearse, who was to be the president of the provisional government in 1916, once spoke of the battlefields of Europe and how "heroism has come back to the earth", Connolly's reaction was "blitherin' idiot!"

Writing on the same subject of the battlefields of Flanders in 1915, Connolly rightly foresaw that: "the carnival of murder on the continent will be remembered as a nightmare in the future, will not have the slightest effect in deciding for good the fate of our homes, our wages, our hours, our conditions. But the victories of labour in Ireland will be as footholds, secure and firm, in the upward climb of our class to the fullness and enjoyment of all that labour creates, and organised society can provide."

As a realist, Connolly took it on himself to study insurrectionary warfare and to instruct the Citizen Army in what they would be facing. The articles he published, subsequently re-published as Revolutionary Warfare, demonstrated that Connolly was the most prepared and practical of the Irish leaders organising military resistance.

In criticism of Connolly, it has been stated that he believed the British military would not use artillery in Dublin because capitalists would hesitate to destroy capitalist property. A reading of his articles demonstrates that Connolly could not have entertained any such naïve notion. And, indeed, not only field guns were used to crush the insurrection but also a warship, HMS Helga, steamed up the Liffey to pound Dublin and her citizens with her guns.

Connolly, from everything he wrote, said and did, was not taking part in the 1916 insurrection to fail nor to become part of the mythical 'blood sacrifice' which later historians have created either because they want to romanticise what happened or because they deliberately want to mislead people.

The revolutionaries of 1916 went out with the desire to win. There is, in fact, no suggestion from any of the leaders of 1916 that they were taking part in a rising that was inevitably doomed to failure. The myth-making started afterwards as C. Desmond Greaves (1913-1988), the socialist activist and historian, has already shown in his 1966 lecture, republished in 1991, 1916 As History: The Myth of the Blood Sacrifice.

Connolly's influence is also seen in the Proclamation of the Irish Republic of 1916 with its progressive commitment to the social welfare of all the sections of the Irish nation. It's guarantees of religious and civil liberty, equal rights and opportunities to all its citizens and the suffrage of all Irishmen and women. It was not until two years later that Britain allowed the franchise to women and then only to those over the age of thirty.

After the insurrection was crushed, Connolly was taken prisoner. Badly wounded during the fighting, the 48 year old Connolly was tried, lying in his hospital bed, by secret court martial, then strapped to a chair because his wounds did now allow him to stand, and executed by firing squad.

That the leaders of the British left claimed to be bewildered by the position he took against imperialism tells us more about their own narrow imperial mindset than it rebounds on Connolly's anti-imperialist stand.

Peter Berresford Ellis is the author of James Connolly: selected writings (1973) and A History of the Irish Working Class (1972) both works are still in print and published by Pluto Press.

This article originally appeared in the Morning Star http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk
http://www.irishdemocrat.co.uk/about-connolly/connolly-1916-blood-sacrifice/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 23:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Albert Ball

May 6, 1917 - Albert Ball, the top British ace of the time, scores his 44th victory; he is killed the next day.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/world-war-i-flight-timeline2.htm

Albert Ball

(...) The squadron armourers and mechanics undertook repair of the faulty machine-gun synchronizer on A8898. Ball had been sporadically flying the Nieuport again, and he was successful with it on 6 May, destroying one more Albatros D.III in an evening flight, for his forty-fourth kill. He had continued to undertake his habitual lone patrols, but had lately been fortunate to survive. The heavier battle damage that Ball's aircraft were now suffering bore witness to the improved team tactics being developed by his German opponents. (...)

On 7 June 1917, the London Gazette announced that Ball had received the Croix de Chevalier, Legion d'Honneur by the French government. The following day, he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions from 25 April to 6 May 1917:

“ Lt. (temp. Capt.) Albert Ball, D.S.O., M.C., late Notts. and Derby. R., and R.F.C.
For most conspicuous and consistent bravery from the 25th of April to the 6th of May, 1917, during which period Capt. Ball took part in twenty-six combats in the air and destroyed eleven hostile aeroplanes, drove down two out of control, and forced several others to land.

In these combats Capt. Ball, flying alone, on one occasion fought six hostile machines, twice he fought five and once four. When leading two other British aeroplanes he attacked an enemy formation of eight. On each of these occasions he brought down at least one enemy.

Several times his aeroplane was badly damaged, once so seriously that but for the most delicate handling his machine would have collapsed, as nearly all the control wires had been shot away. On returning with a damaged machine he had always to be restrained from immediately going out on another.

In all, Capt. Ball has destroyed forty-three German aeroplanes and one balloon, and has always displayed most exceptional courage, determination and skill."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Ball
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 23:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

V. I. Lenin - First All-Russia Congress on Adult Education (May 6-19, 1919)

Speech Of Greeting - May 6
Comrades, it gives me pleasure to greet the Congress on adult education. You do not, of course, expect me to deliver a speech that goes deeply into this subject, like that delivered by the preceding speaker, Comrade Lunacharsky, who is well-informed on the matter and has made a special study of it. Permit me to confine myself to a few words of greeting and to the observations I have made and thoughts that have occurred to me in the Council of People’s Commissars when dealing more or less closely with your work. I am sure that there is not another sphere of Soviet activity in which such enormous progress has been made during the past eighteen months as in the sphere of adult education. Undoubtedly, it has been easier for us and for you to work in this sphere than in others. Here we had to cast aside the old obstacles and the old hindrances. Here it was much easier to do something to meet the tremendous demand for knowledge, for free education and free development, which was felt most among the masses of the workers and peasants; for while the mighty pressure of the masses made it easy for us to remove the external obstacles that stood in their path, to break up the historical bourgeois institutions which bound us to imperialist war and doomed Russia to bear the enormous burden that resulted from this war, we nevertheless felt acutely how heavy the task of re-educating the masses was, the task of organisation and instruction, spreading knowledge, combating that heritage of ignorance, primitiveness, barbarism and savagery that we took over. In this field the struggle had to be waged by entirely different methods; we could count only on the prolonged success and the persistent and systematic influence of the leading sections of the population, an influence which the masses willingly submit to, but often we are guilty of doing less than we could do. I think that in taking these first steps to spread adult education, education, free from the old limits and conventionalities, which the adult population welcomes so much, we had at first to contend with two obstacles. Both these obstacles we inherited from the old capitalist society, which is clinging to us to this day, is dragging us down by thousands and millions of threads, ropes and chains.

The first was the plethora of bourgeois intellectuals, who very often regarded the new type of workers’ and peasants’ educational institution as the most convenient field for testing their individual theories in philosophy and culture, and in which, very often, the most absurd ideas were hailed as something new, and the supernatural and incongruous were offered as purely proletarian art and proletarian culture.[1] (Applause.) This was natural and, perhaps, pardonable in the early days, and the broad movement cannot be blamed for it. I hope that, in the long run, we shall try to get rid of all this and shall succeed.

The second was also inherited from capitalism. The broad masses of the petty-bourgeois working people who were thirsting for knowledge, broke down the old system, but could not propose anything of an organising or organised nature. I had opportunities to observe this in the Council of People’s Commissars when the mobilisation of literate persons and the Library Department were discussed, and from these brief observations I realised the seriousness of the situation in this field. True, it is not quite customary to refer to something bad in a speech of greeting. I hope that you are free from these conventionalities, and will not be offended with me for telling you of my somewhat sad observations. When we raised the question of mobilising literate persons, the most striking thing was the brilliant victory achieved by our revolution without immediately emerging from the limits of the bourgeois revolution. It gave freedom for development to the available forces, but these available forces were petty bourgeois and their watch- word was the old one—each for himself and God for all—the very same accursed capitalist slogan which can never lead to anything but Kolchak and bourgeois restoration. If we review what we are doing to educate the illiterate, I think we shall have to draw the conclusion that we have done very little, and that our duty in this field is to realise that the organisation of proletarian elements is essential. It is not the ridiculous phrases which remain on paper that matter, but the introduction of measures which the people need urgently and which would compel every literate person to regard it his duty to instruct several illiterate persons. This is what our decree says[2]; but in this field hardly anything has been done.

When another question was dealt with in the Council of People’s Commissars, that of the libraries, I said that the complaints we are constantly hearing about our industrial backwardness being to blame, about our having few books and being unable to produce enough—these complaints, I told myself, are justified. We have no fuel, of course, our factories are idle, we have little paper and we cannot produce books. All this is true, but it is also true that we cannot get at the books that are available. Here we continue to suffer from peasant simplicity and peasant helplessness; when the peasant ransacks the squire’s library he runs home in the fear that somebody will take the books away from him, because he cannot conceive of just distribution, of state property that is not something hateful, but is the common property of the workers and of the working people generally. The ignorant masses of peasants are not to blame for this, and as far as the development of the revolution is concerned it is quite legitimate, it is an inevitable stage, and when the peasant took the library and kept it hidden, he could not do otherwise, for he did not know that all the libraries in Russia could be amalgamated and that there would be enough books to satisfy those who can read and to teach those who cannot. At present we must combat the survivals of disorganisation, chaos, and ridiculous departmental wrangling. This must be our main task. We must take up the simple and urgent matter of mobilising the literate to combat illiteracy. We must utilise the books that are available and set to work to organise a network of libraries which will help the people to gain access to every available book; there must be no parallel organisations, but a single, uniform planned organisation. This small matter reflects one of the fundamental tasks of our revolution. If it fails to carry out this task, if it fails to set about creating a really systematic and uniform organisation in place of our Russian chaos and inefficiency, then this revolution will remain a bourgeois revolution because the major specific feature of the proletarian revolution which is marching towards communism is this organisation—for all the bourgeoisie wanted was to break up the old system and allow freedom for the development of peasant farming, which revived the same capitalism as in all earlier revolutions.

Since we call ourselves the Communist Party, we must understand that only now that we have removed the external obstacles and have broken down the old institutions have we come face to face with the primary task of a genuine proletarian revolution in all its magnitude, namely, that of organising tens and hundreds of millions of people. After the eighteen months’ experience that we all have acquired in this field, we must at last take the right road that will lead to victory over the lack of culture, and over the ignorance and barbarism from which we have suffered all this time. (Stormy applause.)

http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1919/may/06.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 23:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

6 May 1919 to 8 Aug 1919 - The Third Anglo-Afghan War

The Third Anglo-Afghan War (also referred to as the Third Afghan War) began on 6 May 1919 and ended with an armistice on 8 August 1919. While it was essentially a minor tactical victory for the British in so much as they were able to repel the regular Afghan forces, in many ways it was a strategic victory for the Afghans. For the British, the Durand Line was reaffirmed as the political boundary between Afghanistan and British India and the Afghans agreed not to foment trouble on the British side. The Afghans won the right to conduct their own foreign affairs as a fully independent state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Anglo-Afghan_War
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 23:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

6 May 1919, Commons Sitting

SOLDIERS' GRAVES IN FRANCE.


HC Deb 06 May 1919 vol 115 c718 718

Mr. MANVILLE asked the Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that at the present rate of progress it is estimated that the Graves Registration Commission will take six years to complete its work, and whether any steps can be taken to accelerate the rate of progress by a more generous supply of labour?

Captain GUEST My hon. Friend is no doubt aware that the functions and responsibilities of the War Office and the Imperial War Graves Commission are not identical in this connection.

The War Office is responsible for the registration and temporary marking of all war graves in the various theatres of war, and for the temporary fencing, tidying and surveying of all war cemeteries. It is also responsible for the exhuming and bringing into permanent cemeteries of all bodies buried in isolated graves.

The Imperial War Graves Commission is an independent body appointed by Royal Charter for the purpose of continuing in perpetuity the work begun by the Army. It will take over each cemetery as soon as completed by the Army, and, after carrying out in it such permanent construction work as may be decided upon, will make the necessary arrangements for maintenance in perpetuity.

It is true that the completion of that portion of the work for which the War Office is responsible has been considerably hampered by lack of the necessary labour, but the estimated period mentioned by my hon. Friend is greatly in excess of that anticipated by the authorities responsible.

The construction work of the Commission on the other hand must inevitably take years to complete, and the duties of maintenance will continue in perpetuity.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/may/06/soldiers-graves-in-france
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2010 23:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Versailles Treaty

1919 May 6 - The Treaty of Versailles is finally ready to be presented to Germany, after three and a half months of argument and comprise. Except for the return of Alsace-Lorraine to France, which is unanimously agreed upon, all of the important treaty provisions regarding German territory are compromises:

(1) Allied occupation of the Rhineland is to continue for at least 15 years, and possibly even longer, and the region is to remain perpetually demilitarized, as is a strip of territory 30 miles deep along the right bank of the Rhine. Three smaller frontier regions near Eupen and Malmedy are to be ceded to Belgium. Parts of the German provinces of Posen and West Prussia are to be given to Poland to provide that revived nation with access to the Baltic Sea. The Baltic seaport of Gdansk (Danzig) is to become a free state, linked economically to Poland. This leaves East Prussia completely separated from the rest of Germany by what is called the "Polish Corridor" to the Baltic.

(2) All of Germany's overseas possessions are to be occupied by the Allies but are to be organized as "mandates," subject to the supervision and control of the League of Nations. Britain and France divide most of Germany's African colonies, and Japan takes over its extensive island possessions in the South Pacific.

(3) The treaty also requires Germany to accept sole responsibility and guilt for causing the war. Kaiser Wilhelm and other unspecified German war leaders are to be tried as war criminals. (This provision will never be enforced.)

(4) Several ther military and economic provisions are designed not only to punish Germany for its alleged war guilt, but also to insure France and the rest of the world against any future German aggression: The German army is limited to 100,000 men and is not allowed to possess any heavy artillery, the general staff is abolished, the navy is to be reduced. No air force will be permitted, and the production of all military planes is forbidden.

(5) Germany is to payfor all civilian damages caused during the war. This burden, combined with payment of Reparations to the Allies of great quantities of industrial goods, merchant shipping, and raw materials, is expected to prevent Germany from being able to finance any major military effort even if it is inclined to evade the military limitations.

http://www.humanitas-international.org/showcase/chronography/timebase/1919tbse.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 06 Mei 2010 0:24    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Diary of Thomas Fredrick Littler

May 6th 1916 - The battalion marched away from Grand-Rullecourt, joined the 56th Division, marching towards the line on the Somme, we passed through Sombrin, Bavincourt, Saulty, Gaudiempre, Humbercamps, St Amand, and arrived at Souastre 9-45 after a tedious march of 18 kilos, on the way we passed old disused trenches, also the roads and countryside showed wear and tear of the 1914 offensive.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/diaries/littlerdiary3.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 17:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Telegram to Miss Watters, 6th May 1914, by Cecil Malthus



http://christchurchcitylibraries.com/Heritage/Digitised/WarsandConflicts/WorldWarI/Malthus/Malthus-1914-05-06.asp
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 18:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ste Gertrudis: 96e verjaardag van kerkwijding



Op 6 mei 1914, enkele maanden voor het uitbreken van de eerste Wereldoorlog, kwam de Oud-Katholieke gemeente van de Hoek uit haar schuilplaats en betrok onwennig de nieuwe kerk. Het bleef vertrouwde grond maar een gebouw zó duidelijk zichtbaar voor de Utrechtse bevolking die het oude schuilkerkje nog nooit van binnen had gezien, vroeg om een aanpassing die sommige mensen maar moeilijk konden maken. Maar zoals het vaker is gebeurd in de geschiedenis, toen en ook nu, het kwam wel goed. Er ontstond een nieuwe nestgeur, er was veel nieuw, maar ook veel van het vertrouwde kerkbezit dat meeverhuisde, maakte de herkenning gemakkelijk.

Ook toen waren er mensen die het goed vonden dat we als Oud- Katholieken eindelijk aan de weg timmerden, maar het heeft nog heel wat jaren en generaties geduurd voordat we als parochie waren aangekomen op het punt waar we nu zijn.

http://utrecht.okkn.nl/pagina/688/in_het_hart_van_de_zaak_13
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 18:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Horace Smith-Dorrien & Herbert Plumer

Op 6 mei 1915 wordt generaal sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, de bevelhebber van het Britse 2e leger, ontslagen en vervangen door generaal Herbert Plumer. Deze overweegt een tactische terugtrekking in te voeren om zo de druk op de Ieperboog te verminderen, maar dit is geheel tegen de wil van veldmaarschalk sir John French. Deze laatste beveelt direct verdere tegenaanvallen.

http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/wiki/index.php/Tweede_Slag_om_Ieper
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 18:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A Tribute to the Lusitania: Torpedoed on May 6, 1915



THE DEATH OF THE LUSITANIA

O LUSITANIA, Empress of the Sea
Art thou dead and buried in the deep.
With all thy freight of human souls,
Victim of the Huns ’most Hellish darts.

Come nations! Rise, avenge this hideous crime.
Avenge the cries of English hope,
now lying cold and dead in ocean deep.
Come nations! Rise and crush

This hideous foe: this vampire of the world, who
is no man
but just a beast of prey respecting nothing.
Laying waste to works of centuries.
Breaking hearts and homes on every side.

Come quickly, come, o’er England’s blood
Be shed in vain, her noble sons all dead
And lying on the plains. Come, nations,
Crush this vampire into dust; come quickly, come.

O Lusitania, my tears are falling for thee
Fair village of palaces, gone for evermore
Beneath the cold blue waters.


~Mrs. Phoebe Amory, a Lusitania survivor

http://landmarksofliberty.blogspot.com/2010/05/tribute-to-lusitania-torpedoed-on-may-6.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 18:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

May 6, 1911: Hangman George Maledon dies



George Maledon, the man who executed at least 60 men for "Hanging Judge" Isaac Parker, dies from natural causes in Tennessee.

Few men actively seek out the job of hangman and Maledon was no exception. Raised by German immigrants in Detroit, Michigan, Maledon moved to Fort Smith, Arkansas, in his late teens and joined the city police force. He joined the Union Army during the Civil War, and he then returned to Fort Smith where he was appointed a U.S. deputy marshal. The town also had occasional need of an executioner, and Maledon agreed to take on the grisly task in addition to his regular duties as a marshal.

Maledon wound up with more business than he expected. In 1875, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed a young prosecuting attorney named Isaac Parker to be the federal judge of the Western District of Arkansas. Headquartered at Fort Smith, the Western District was one of the most notoriously corrupt in the country, and it included the crime-ridden Indian Territory to the west (in present-day Oklahoma). Indian Territory had become a refuge for rustlers, murderers, thieves, and fugitives, and Parker's predecessor often accepted bribes to look the other way. Assigned an unprecedented force of 200 U.S. marshals to restore order, Parker began a massive dragnet that led to the arrest of many criminals. A friend of the Indians and more sympathetic to the victims of crimes than the criminals, Parker doled out swift justice in his court. In his first months in session he tried 91 defendants and sentenced eight of them to hang.

It was Maledon's job to carry out Judge Parker's death sentences. Paid $100 for each hanging, Maledon willingly accepted the work. He tried to be a conscientious hangman who minimized suffering with a quick death. Maledon said he considered the job "honorable and respectable work and I mean to do it well."

In all, Maledon is believed to have hanged about 60 men and to have shot five more who tried to escape. Subsequent sensational accounts of the Fort Smith "Hanging Judge" unfairly painted Parker as a cruel sadist with Maledon as his willing henchman. Yet, it is well to keep in mind that 65 marshals were also killed in the line of duty attempting to bring law and order to Indian Territory during Parker's term.

After Parker died from diabetes in 1896, Maledon met a publicity-seeking attorney named J. Warren Reed, who had written a lurid account of the Fort Smith court entitled Hell on the Border. Attracted by the promise of fame and money, Maledon joined Reed in a promotional tour for the book. He willingly played the role of the ghoulish hangman, displaying ropes he had preserved and telling which were used to execute various outlaws.

After a year of touring, Maledon tired of the limelight and used his earnings to purchase a farm. A small man with a weak constitution, he did not have the strength to work the farm profitably, and soon after entered a soldier's home at Johnson City, Tennessee, where he remained until his death in 1911.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/hangman-george-maledon-dies
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 18:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Baseball Flashback: Babe Ruth's First Home Run, May 6, 1915
by Harvey Frommer

In the third inning at the Polo Grounds, 20-year-old pitcher Babe Ruth slammed the first pitch off Yankee right-hander Jack Warhop into the second tier of the right field grandstand for a home run. It was the first home run for the youngster in his 18th time at bat in the major leagues.

As Ruth trotted around the bases running out the home run he had blasted, the 8,000 in attendance, including Red Sox owner Joseph Lannin, American League president Ban Johnson and sportswriters Damon Runyan and Heywood Broun, cheered him on.

Runyan wrote in his account of the game: "Fanning this Ruth is not as easy as the name and the occupation might indicate. In the third inning, Ruth knocked the slant out of one of Jack Warhop's underhanded subterfuges, and put the baseball in the right field stands for a home run. Ruth was discovered by Jack Dunn in a Baltimore school a year ago where he had not attained his left-handed majority, and was adopted and adapted by Jack for use of the Orioles. He is now quite a demon pitcher and demon hitter when he connects."

Ironically, the momentous first of the Babe's 714 career home runs came against the team he would come to symbolize - -the New York Yankees. The homer was his fifth major league hit. In ten times at bat in 1914 and eight times at the plate in 1915, he had notched three doubles and a single.

"Mr. Warhop of the Yankees," wrote Wilmot Giffin in the New York Evening Journal, "looked reproachfully at the opposing pitcher who was so unclubby as to do a thing like that to one of his own trade. But Ruthless Ruth seemed to think that all was fair in the matter of fattening a batting average."

Ruth's singular shot and two other hits notwithstanding, the Yankees were able to eke out a 4-3 triumph in 13 innings over the Red Sox who committed four errors. The Babe was saddled with the loss.

http://baseballguru.com/hfrommer/analysishfrommer31.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 19:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Visum voor Aletta Jacobs om te kunnen reizen in Duitsland en Oostenrijk-Hongarije, 6 mei 1915

http://www.metamorfoze.nl/webtentoonstelling/detail.php?nummer=20
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 19:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Scientific American 1916-05-06

Bridge construction workers shown high among the girders on a new lift bridge being built over a river; a boat passes underneath.



http://iphone.magazineart.org/main.php/v/technical/scientificamerican/ScientificAmerican1916-05-06.jpg.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 19:13    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Achtergrond conflict Hutu’s en Tutsi’s

Omstreeks het begin van onze tijdrekening, beslissen 3 volkeren, uit verschillende streken, zich in het toen nog onbewoonde grondgebied, dat we nu als Ruanda kennen, te vestigen: de Twa’s, de Hutu’s en de Tutsi’s. Twa’s zullen de eerste bewoners van Ruanda zijn. Het zijn nomaden. Nu hebben de meeste dit bestaan opgegeven. Op dit moment blijven er in Ruanda nog maar weinig groepen Twa’s over. Deze leven meestal gescheiden van de andere Ruandezen en zijn weinig geïntegreerd in de maatschappij. De grootste bevolkingsgroep binnen Ruanda zijn de Hutu’s. Zij zijn in de 7de eeuw na Christus hier binnengetrokken. Het zijn boeren van Bantoeorigine uit de omliggende landen. Ze leven in kleine koninkrijkjes met aan het hoofd een ‘Mwami’. De laatste groep zijn de Tutsi’s, ze komen het land gewoon binnen als nomaden, zoekend naar weigronden voor hun vee. Door de goede relatie met de Hutu’s, beslissen ze zich daar te vestigen. Alhoewel ze niet erg talrijk zijn, slagen ze er toch in langzamerhand de macht naar zich toe te trekken, door de Hutu’s te betrekken in hun cliëntensysteem. Ze verspreiden zo hun levenswijze op een subtiele manier. Als de machtsverhoudingen eenmaal vastliggen, stichten de Tutsi’s de koninkrijken Ruanda en Urundi, met aan het hoofd een Tutsi, de Mwami. Hierbij nemen ze volledig de taal, godsdienst, cultuur en vooral ook de politieke structuur van de Hutu’s over. In 1890 worden de landen Ruanda en Burundi bezet door de Duitsers en ingelijfd bij Duits Oost-Afrika. In augustus 1914 interpreteert een Duitse gezant in Kongo zijn bewaking als een vijandige daad. Hij meldt dat België aanstuurt op oorlog. Wereldoorlog 1 was nu ook uitgebreid tot in Afrika. Op 6 mei 1916 trekken ‘Belgische’ soldaten Kigali, verlaten door de Duitsers, binnen. Door de Volkerenbond worden Ruanda en Burundi als mandaatgebieden bestempeld. De inwoners zijn dus geen inwoners van het Belgisch koninkrijk, hoewel België het land wel bestuurt. Ook onder Belgisch bewind, bleven de Tutsi’s het land regeren. Dit zou echter niet lang meer duren. Het feodale systeem brokkelt namelijk langzaam af en door het katholieke onderwijs ontstaat er ook een Hutu-elite, die de overheersing niet langer aanvaardt. In 1957 dan schaart de katholieke Kerk zich openlijk aan de zijde van de Hutu’s. Aangezien België de onafhankelijkheid zolang mogelijk wil uitstellen en de Tutsi’s hopen op een snelle afscheuring om hun gezag en status te kunnen handhaven, schaart ook België zich achter de Hutu’s. Zo ontstaat een merkwaardige coalitie onder ‘leiding’ van Kayibanda. Ook worden er Hutu-partijen opgericht, waaronder de Parti du Mouvement de l’Émancipation Hutu (PARMEHUTU). Juli 1959. De Tutsi-vorst Mutara sterft. Zijn opvolger staat onder invloed van uitgesproken Tutsi-monarchisten, die voor hard optreden waren tegen Hutu-leiders en gematigde Tutsi’s. 1 november 1959. Aanhangers van de Tutsi-partij vallen een Hutu-onderchef aan die zwaar gemolesteerd wordt. Dit is de aanleiding voor een bloedbad tussen de twee volkeren. In deze Hutu-opstand worden honderden tot duizenden Tutsi’s vermoord. Duizenden anderen vluchten onder andere naar Oeganda, waar ze later het RPF vormen, het Ruandees Patriottisch Front. In de inderhaast door de Belgen ingerichte verkiezingen in 1960 winnen de Hutu’s op overweldigende wijze. Het wordt de huidige Mwami te heet onder de voeten en hij vlucht in juli 1960. In oktober 1960 wordt een regering opgericht, onder leiding van Kayibanda, met 7 Ruandese ministers, waaronder twee Tutsi’s. Formeel blijft Ruanda echter nog steeds onder de voogdij van België staan. Op 1 juli 1962 geschiedt het onvermijdelijke en worden zowel Ruanda als Burundi onafhankelijk. In Burundi echter blijven de Tutsi’s aan de macht. Toch wordt Ruanda in 1963 opnieuw geteisterd door een nog veel groter bloedbad. Verdreven Tutsi’s doen een inval, waarop een nieuwe slachtpartij begint. Naar schatting worden 10000 Tutsi’s afgemaakt. Dit incident zorgt voor een radicalisering bij de Hutu’s: de 2 Tutsi’s worden uit de regering gezet, hun partij wordt het zwijgen opgelegd en Ruanda wordt een eenpartijstaat waar de Hutu’s baas zijn. Toch zijn de extreme Hutu’s nog niet tevreden: zij eisen dat alle Tutsi’s zouden worden verwijderd uit de invloedrijke posities die ze soms nog bezitten in bestuur, onderwijs en leger. Het regime van president Kayibanda zou het een tiental jaren volhouden. Hij vervalt tijdens de jaren ’70 in vriendjespolitiek ten gunste van de Hutu’s uit het centrum van het land. Dit tot tegenzin van de Hutu’s uit het noorden, die sterk staan in het leger. Op 5 juli 1973 volgt een geweldloze staatsgreep. De stafchef van het leger, Habyarimana, grijpt de macht en roept de ‘Tweede Republiek’ uit, waarvan hij president wordt en een regering van burgers vormt (nieuwe grondwet in 1978). Onder zijn bewind komt er een centraler geleid bestuursapparaat (verbod op politieke partijen en oprichting MRND (Mouvement Révolutionaire National pour le Dévelopement)) en een trend naar economisch nationalisme. Maar zijn grootste doel is een verzoening tussen de Hutu’s en Tutsi’s. Die lijkt er ook te komen met een topconferentie in 1974 van de staatshoofden van Ruanda, Burundi en Zaïre (thans Kongo). Er wordt een akkoord gesloten met betrekking tot de veiligheid aan de staatsgrenzen. Twee jaar later sluiten de drie landen de Economische Gemeenschap van de Grote Meren. Tutsi’s mogen vanaf nu 14 % van alle banen in de moderne sectoren bezetten. Op de identiteitskaart van elke Ruandees staat nu ook zijn afkomst. Zonder enige twijfel is dit beleid tot 1988 een zegen voor Ruanda. Ruanda en zijn president zijn bovendien graag gezien in België en dan vooral bij Boudewijn. Door de afhankelijkheid aan andere landen ziet men echter niet dat het regime aan metaalmoeheid begint te leiden. Er heerst hongersnood, de koffieprijzen storten in, er breken een reeks politieke schandalen uit. Het regime is duidelijk niet meer wat het was. Tegelijkertijd vind ook in buurland Burundi een slachting plaats waardoor talrijke Hutu’s naar Ruanda vluchten. Te midden van deze groeiende crisis, vallen op 1 oktober 1990 zo’n 10000 rebellen vanuit Uganda het land binnen. Ze noemen zich het FPR, Front Patriotique Rwandais. Het RPF streeft naar de terugkeer en een volledige amnestie voor de Tutsi-vluchtelingen en de totstandkoming van een democratie. Met de hulp van Zaïrese, Franse en Belgische troepen weet het regeringsleger stand te houden. Ondanks verschillende overeenkomsten tussen RPF en regeringsleger houden de gewelddadigheden aan. Ook de invoering van een meerpartijenstelsel (in 1991) en de vorming van een overgangsregering (1992), waarin zowel de regeringspartij als het RPF en andere oppositiepartijen vertegenwoordigd zijn, maakten geen einde aan de voortdurende gewelddadigheden. De gewelddadigheden beperken zich niet tot gevechten tussen het RPF en het regeringsleger. Verschillende Hutu-milities proberen door het plegen van aanslagen en gewelddadigheden tegen Tutsi en democratiseringsgezinde Hutu het democratiseringsproces van president Habyarimana te saboteren. Op 6 april 1994 komt Habyarimana om het leven bij een raketaanslag op het vliegtuig waarin hij zit. De ware toedracht van deze aanslag, waarbij o.a. ook president Ntaryamira van Boeroendi de dood vind, blijft onduidelijk. Na de dood van Habyarimana beginnen extreme Hutu’s (Interahamwe) een klopjacht op Tutsi’s en (vermeende) politieke tegenstanders in Hutu-kringen. De genocide waarin dit resulteerde, kostte het leven aan tussen de 500.000 en 1 miljoen mensen, vooral Tutsi’s. Het RPF maakte gebruik van de onduidelijke situatie en bezette grote delen van het land. De nog aanwezige VN-troepen verlieten het land. Uit angst voor het oprukkende RPF vluchtten veel Hutu (burgers, extremisten en militairen uit het regeringsleger) naar veiliger gebieden in Rwanda en naar vluchtelingenkampen, m.n. in Zaïre (bij Goma en Birava). In juli trok het RPF de hoofdstad Kigali binnen. Daarop werd een nieuwe regering beëdigd en Pasteur Bizimungu, een uit het RPF afkomstige Hutu, werd tot president benoemd. Hiermee kwam echter geen einde aan het geweld en de politieke onenigheid. De terugkeer van de vluchtelingen liep bovendien grote vertraging op. Naar schatting 1 miljoen Rwandezen waren in 1996 nog altijd ontheemd.
Vijf kilometer over de grens met Congo kamperen nog altijd 800.000 Rwandezen, overwegend Hutu’s die in 1994 op de vlucht gingen voor het oprukkende FPR. De kampen worden nog altijd gecontroleerd door politieke krachten die aan de volkerenmoord deelnamen. De terugkeer van de vluchtelingen is zo goed als stilgevallen. Hutu-bendes voeren strooptochten uit en destabiliseren het westen van Rwanda. Ze leggen mijnen om gemeenschappen te verhinderen te isoleren en te verhinderen dat hulp de heuvels bereikt. De vluchtelingen keren ook niet terug omdat de veiligheidssituatie in het land precair blijft.

http://dagboekcongo.blogspot.com/2007/10/achtergrond-conflict-hutus-en-tutsis.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 20:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Plundering, vorderingen en voedselgebrek
Claudine Wallart

Vorderingen

Net als bij iedere oorlog heerst ook hier in het begin de overtuiging dat de strijd maar van korte duur zal zijn en worden vorderingen uitgevoerd zonder de minste controle.

Maar al vrij snel, vanaf eind 1914, wordt een georganiseerd vorderingssysteem opgezet. De Duitsers stellen een lijst op van alle grondstoffen en industrieproducten uit de bezette gebieden. In 1916 verschijnt in München een rapport van het Algemene Hoofdkwartier dat alle takken van industrie inventariseert van de industrie in bezet Frankrijk.

Het doel is tweeledig: concurrentie uitschakelen en het afstraffen van fabrieken die weigeren met de bezetter samen te werken. Op het boerenland wordt de inventaris opgemaakt van vee, graan, aardappelen, hooi en stro, akkerland, ingezaaid land, enzovoort. Elke etappe-inspectiedienst beschikt over een economische commissie die belast is met de exploitatie en de vorderingen en heffingen doorgeeft aan de desbetreffende Kommandanturen.

Vanaf 1916 moet elk huishouden de lijst van zijn bezittingen opstellen en die duidelijk zichtbaar ophangen. Alles is geschikt voor vordering: linnengoed, meubels, matrassen, kurken, wijn, gereedschap, metalen, hout, keukengerei, leer, rubber…

Koperen leidingen in fabrieken worden gedemonteerd, standbeelden en kerkklokken omgesmolten, zinken dakgoten en prikkeldraad rond de weilanden in beslag genomen. Wol van matrassen wordt gebruikt voor het maken van uniformen. Bossen worden kaalgekapt in Mormal en Raismes voor het stutten van loopgraven. Landbouwopzichters schatten van tevoren de oogstopbrengst die moet worden ingebracht. Als de boeren zelf hun land bewerken, wordt het grootste deel van de oogst geconfisqueerd. Zo niet, dan wordt het werk aan dwangarbeiders opgelegd.

Noodgeld

De bezette gemeentes hebben totaal geen contact meer met de Franse overheid en moeten buitensporige boetes en heffingen betalen, hulp verlenen en voedsel verstrekken aan de bezetters. Hun enige uitweg is de uitgifte van gemeentebonnen, aflosbaar na de oorlog. Dit ‘noodgeld’ is noch officieel noch helemaal legaal, want er is geen beslissing of toestemming van de overheid aan voorafgegaan.

Het kan gewoon niet anders, gezien de omstandigheden. Verontrust over de enorme toename van de bonnen besluiten de Duitse autoriteiten om alleen bonnen toe te staan die worden uitgegeven door grotere steden, samenwerkende gemeentes en beroepsorganisaties. Ook wordt de vormgeving – papier, formaat, kleur en tekst – vastgelegd. De afgekeurde bonnen moeten geleidelijk uit de omloop worden genomen (hetgeen nogmaals duidelijk wordt herhaald in de verordeningen van 6 mei 1917 en 1 april 1918).

Hongersnood

Vanwege de door Groot-Brittannië in 1914 opgelegde zeeblokkade moet Duitsland zijn bevolking van voedsel voorzien uit eigen middelen. Door een bijzonder slechte oogst in 1916 komt het dagelijkse broodrantsoen op 200 gram. Duitsland stelt overheidscontrole in om door rantsoenering te vermijden dat een tekort ontstaat en om de prijzen te handhaven. Er komen distributiebureaus die moeten zorgen voor de vordering van en heffingen op landbouwproducten als graan, aardappelen en bieten.

Ook wordt gezocht naar ‘Ersätze’, ofwel vervangende producten: bijvoorbeeld koolrabi in plaats van aardappelen en hop of eikenblad in plaats van tabak. Boter kan worden vervangen door een mengsel van margarine, talg en zetmeel. De werktijd wordt verlengd en in fabrieken worden vrouwen, bejaarden, kinderen en invaliden aangenomen.

In het voorjaar van 1917 moet de Duitse infanterist per dag genoegen nemen met 400 gram brood, aardappelmeel of peulvruchten met een beetje boter of reuzel. Alcohol wordt alleen nog maar uitgedeeld vóór de gevechten. Om voldoende te eten moeten de mannen het dus hebben van vorderingen in bezet gebied.

Als de blokkade in de loop van 1917 geleidelijk aan wordt versterkt, komt het tot nog strengere voedselbeperkingen voor de bevolking: per persoon 200 gram volkorenmeel per dag en 5 pond aardappelen, 250 gram vlees en 50 gram boter (meestal margarine) per week. Er is gebrek aan steenkool, leer en textiel: alles gaat naar het leger.

De volksgezondheid in de bezette gebieden gaat door deze staat van ondervoeding hard achteruit: dysenterie, cholera, tuberculose, scheurbuik en pokken slaan toe. Het aantal geboortes vermindert schrikbarend en kindersterfte loopt op. De zwarte markt functioneert hoe langer hoe beter en er komen gaarkeukens in de grote steden.

In Duitsland wordt de voedselcrisis door de socialistische Spartakisten aangegrepen om stakingen, onlusten en muiterijen (met name bij de marine) te organiseren - die hard worden neergeslagen - en op een compromisvrede aan te sturen. In Oostenrijk-Hongarije en bij de Oost-Europese bondgenoten van Duitsland, zoals Turkije en Bulgarije, heerst ook voedselschaarste en komt het tot oproer en onlusten als verzet tegen de vorderingen op het platteland.

In Frankrijk, Engeland en Italië wordt de bevoorrading belemmerd door de buitensporige onderzeebotenoorlog in 1917, terwijl de oogst op het platteland in de knel komt vanwege de mobilisatie van de mannen. Inflatie, leningen en tekorten ontmoedigen de bevolking, stemmen tot ontevredenheid en geven de aanzet tot stakingen, waaraan de vrouwen die voor de (Franse) verdediging werken massaal meedoen.

Ondervoeding en het Comité d’alimentation du Nord

De Amerikaanse Commissie voor Hulp aan België (Commission for Relief in Belgium – CRB), aanvankelijk bedoeld om hulp te verlenen aan door de oorlog in Europa verraste Amerikanen, wordt op 22 oktober 1914 in Brussel opgericht door de Amerikaan Brand Whitlock, de Spaanse ambassadeur de markies van Villalobar en de Amerikaanse ingenieur (en toekomstige president van Amerika) Herbert Hoover. De commissie wordt gefinancierd door Groot-Brittannië en de Verenigde Staten.

Het Comité d’alimentation du Nord de la France wordt opgericht in april 1915, nadat Louis Guérin, een industrieel uit Lille, contact had gelegd met het Comité National Belge en de CRB. In april 1915 krijgt hij toestemming van de Duitsers die maar al te graag van de bevoorrading van de Franse burgerbevolking af willen en beloven om de voedselhulp niet te vorderen. De CRB is een soort tussenpersoon die de orders ontvangt en de bestelde producten verstuurt naar het Comité National Belge. Deze zorgt voor het verdere vervoer naar het Comité d’alimentation du Nord, dat op zijn beurt de distributie regelt naar de plaatselijke commissies in de bezette steden en dorpen. Omdat het Comité d’alimentation du Nord vanuit bezet gebied geen deviezen kan versturen, wordt de betaling van de voedselhulp geregeld door het Belgische Comité.

Toch moet de sterk filantropische instelling van de organisatie niet worden onderschat. In zijn eerste jaarverslag noemt ingenieur Hoover het departement Nord “een uitgestrekt concentratiekamp waarin elke vorm van economische activiteit geheel is stilgevallen” en waar hulp moet worden geboden aan 2.125.000 mensen. De Verenigde Staten sturen schepen met voedsel naar het hoofddepot in Rotterdam waarna de voedselhulp via de binnenwateren verder wordt verdeeld. De spoorlijnen zijn uitsluitend voor gebruik van het Duitse leger. De opslagruimtes staan niet onder controle van de Duitse autoriteiten die beloofd hebben dat de levensmiddelen niet gevorderd worden en alleen ten goede komen aan de Franse bevolking. Ook verlenen de Duitsers soms medewerking aan de voedseltransporten.

Voor een beter overzicht van de behoeften en om de voedselhulp te verdelen, wordt het departement Nord in drie districten verdeeld, Lille, Douai en Fourmies (Maubeuge wordt aanvankelijk vanuit België bevoorraad). Elk district is onderverdeeld in regio’s met elk een regionaal comité. Bijna de helft van de hulp (42%) komt uit de Verenigde Staten, 25% uit de Britse koloniën, 24% uit Groot-Brittannië en 9% uit neutrale landen (met name Nederland). Het gaat voornamelijk om meel, tarwe, mais, rijst, pasta, bonen, spek, vet en olie, zout, suiker, koffie en zeep. Naderhand komen er ook aardappelen uit Nederland, pootgroente, zaaigoed, speciale producten voor kinderen en medicijnen.

In 1916 krijgt iedere bewoner per dag gemiddeld 240 gram meel, 14 gram maïs, 60 gram rijst, 48 gram spek of vleesconserven, 15 gram suiker, 19 gram koffie, 19 gram melk en 16 gram zeep. Het aantal calorieën dat het Voedselcomité verstrekt is naar schatting 1.100 tot 1.300 per persoon per dag. De levensmiddelen worden volledig gelijk verdeeld. Mensen die het kunnen, moeten ervoor betalen, alleen behoeftigen krijgen gratis voedsel.

Na de oorlogsverklaring van de Verenigde Staten neemt het Spaans-Nederlands Comiteit de voedselorganisatie over, maar de uitbreiding van de onderzeebotenoorlog brengt de bevoorrading in gevaar. De aanvoer in Rotterdam daalt met 55 procent. Dus worden de leveringen vanuit Nederland opgevoerd, voornamelijk van zaden voor het inzaaien van moestuinen. De Duitsers zeggen toe dat noch het zaaigoed noch de oogst worden geconfisqueerd. Aan het eind van de oorlog verleent het ‘Comiteit’ ook zijn medewerking aan het repatriëren van 40.000 personen via Nederland en zet zich in voor de bevoorrading van de inwoners van de bezette gebieden, geëvacueerd tijdens de Duitse terugtocht.

De Commission for Relief in Belgium wordt eind december 1918 ontbonden. We kunnen stellen dat dit hulpcomité de bevolking van de Nord een hongersnood heeft bespaard.

Intussen staat het slecht met de gezondheidssituatie van de bevolking. De directeur van het Pasteur Instituut in Lille, Dokter Calmette, geeft aan dat het sterftecijfer van 19-21 promille van vóór de oorlog is gestegen naar 41-55 promille in 1918 en dat tuberculose in sterke mate is toegenomen.

http://www.wegenvanherdenking-noordfrankrijk.com/achtergrondinformatie/translate-to-neerlandais-le-nord-et-le-bassin-minier-sous-loccupation/pillages-requisitions-et-difficultes-alimentaires.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 20:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Captain Albert Ball, Early British Ace and Popular Hero, KIA May 6, 1917

Won't it be nice when all this beastly killing is over, and we can enjoy ourselves and not hurt anyone? I hate this game.

http://www.the-great-war-society.org/airtheme.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 20:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

6 May 1918: Time Changes for the Streetcar Schedule

On this day in 1918, the Athens Daily Herald published the "slight adjustment of schedules" by the Athens Railway & Electric Company "to meet present conditions." The new schedule was published daily for a week.

From 5:15 a. m., city time, or 6:15 a. m., government time, a half-hour schedule will be operated for one hour, making all connections for the early trains.

From 10:50 p.m., city time, or 11:50 p. m., government time, a half hour schedule will be operated on the Milledge and Lumpkin belt, the M. and L. cars alternating every fifteen minutes from downtown, M. car 10:50 p.m., 11:20 p.m., and 11:50 p.m., and L. car 11:05 p.m., and 11:35 p.m., city time
.

"Government time" refers to the first institution of Daylight Saving Time by the United States, though it had been used in Europe since 1916. Congress passed the law establishing the use of Daylight Saving Time on March 19, 1918, as a way to conserve energy during the First World War.

The law went into effect on March 31, 1918, and also established the first official time zones in the United States. The time change was unpopular, and was repealed in 1919. President Franklin D. Roosevelt re-established the use of Daylight Saving Time in 1942, using the moniker "war time."

After the end of the Second World War, the shift to Daylight Saving Time was considered a local issue, but the inconsistencies caused enough problems that in 1966, Congress passed the Uniform Time Act. States could choose to opt out by passing a bill in their legislature. Today, only Arizona and Hawaii do not observe Daylight Saving Time.

http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=394597849703&comments&ref=mf
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 20:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Air Post & Other Special Service Stamps


1918, 24¢ Inverted Jenny

Air Post - On May 6, 1918, Congress passed a bill authorizing the first official air post service. The rate was set at 24¢, and the first route authorized was between Washington D.C. and New York with a stop in Philadelphia. Postmaster General Albert Burleson, under the Wilson administration, had pushed for the new service. The airplane proved to be a useful fighting tool during the First World War, and Secretary of War Newton Baker was looking to expand the peacetime applications for flight. The Army furnished planes and pilots for the first service. The 24¢ Air Post stamp was prepared in less than two weeks for use on the inaugural flight on May 15, 1918. This hurried production contributed to the creation of one of philately’s most famous stamps, the Inverted Jenny.

Flights prior to May 15, 1918, are referred to as pioneer flights. Two stamps used in connection with semi-official mail service on these early flights are listed in the Scott Catalogue. The first is the Buffalo Balloon stamp, Scott CL1, which was used for mail carried by balloon on June 8, 1877, from Nashville to Gallatin, Tennessee. Only 300 were issued. The second is the Rodgers Vin Fiz stamp, Scott CL2, which was used in 1911 on mail carried by Calbraith Rodgers between legs of his attempted transcontinental flight. Rodgers was attempting to win the $50,000 prize offered by publisher William Randolph Hearst to the first person to cross the United States in 30 days or less.

http://www.siegelauctions.com/enc/airpost.htm
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 20:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Karel Doorman

(...) In 1915, twee jaar voor het ontstaan van de Marineluchtvaartdienst, behaalde hij reeds zijn FAI (civiel) vliegbrevet en in 1916 zijn marinebrevet. Twee jaar later zette Karel Doorman met enkele anderen in Nederland de Marineluchtvaartdienst op, en hoewel er beweert wordt dat hij als één van de oudste MLD-vliegers de eerste commandant van het marinevliegkamp "De Mok" op Texel was, is hij dit nooit geweest. (...)

In 1918 wordt Karel Doorman instructeur op marinevliegkamp "De Kooy" bij Den Helder, en van 1919 tot 1921 is hij commandant van "De Kooy". Op 6 mei 1919 treed Doorman in het huwelijk met Justine Amatha Dorothea Schermer, een verbintenis die trouwens op 16 juni 1934 door echtscheiding werd ontbonden. Uit dit huwelijk werden twee zoons en een dochter geboren. Op 1 november 1920 was hij ondertussen bevorderd tot luitenant der zee der eerste klasse. Op 2 november 1921 volgde een plaatsing op de Hogere Marine Krijgsschool en daar behaalde hij na twee jaar de aantekening 'meer uitgebreide kennis wetenschap'. (...)

http://www.charybdis.nl/karel-doorman/
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16018
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 05 Mei 2011 20:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Photo taken on May 6, 1919, of the Eiffel Tower being struck by lightning.



http://bestfunfacts.com/science_nature.html
_________________

“Stop whining.”
– A. Schwarzenegger
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group