Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

10 April

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45653

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2006 6:36    Onderwerp: 10 April Reageer met quote

April 11

1919 International Labor Organization founded

On this day in 1919, in Paris, France, the International Labor Organization (ILO) is founded as an independent, affiliated agency of the League of Nations.

The call for just and equal labor standards and improved working and living conditions for the world’s workers had begun to be heard long before the outbreak of World War I. As the Industrial Revolution swept from France and Britain across the rest of Europe over the course of the 19th century, it completely altered the economic and social landscape of the continent (and eventually the world). Among the early advocates of an international organization to regulate labor were Robert Owen, a Welsh socialist and the founder of the first, short-lived British trade union in 1833; Charles Hindley (1800-1857), a cotton spinner and member of the British parliament from 1853 to 1857; and Daniel Legrand, a French industrialist, philanthropist, and writer.

Though these 19th-century thinkers were ahead of their time, the unparalleled destruction wrought by the Great War of 1914-1918 led to increased support among the world’s leaders for just such an organization, not only to regulate labor standards for the steadily growing international population of industrial workers, but also to preserve peace in the volatile atmosphere of the post-war world. For U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, especially, this peace-keeping organization—the League of Nations—was the most important part of the Versailles negotiations.

The creation of an international labor organization as a separate but affiliated agency of the League was seen by its founders as a necessary and vital part of the League itself. The ILO Constitution, written between January and April 1919, by a commission of representatives from nine countries—Belgium, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, France, Italy, Japan, Poland, the United Kingdom and the United States—and chaired by Samuel Gompers, head of the American Federation of Labour (AFL), eventually became Part XIII of the Treaty of Versailles.

Its preamble began with a statement of purpose—“…The League of Nations has for its object the establishment of universal peace, and such a peace can be established only if it is based upon social justice”—and went on to lay out the threefold motivation behind the creation of the ILO. First, there was a necessity to improve the conditions of the average worker, who without regulation was increasingly subject to exploitation by industrial management, including long hours, low wages and harsh treatment. There was also a political motive: if conditions did not improve, the growing discontent among the world’s workers threatened to explode into large-scale demonstrations of unrest and possibly revolution, as had occurred in Russia in 1917 and to a lesser extent in Germany and Austria-Hungary near the end of the war. Thirdly, without universal standards of labor that could be enforced across international borders, any country that instituted social reform would find itself at a disadvantage economically.

The ILO as created in April 1919 was a tripartite organization—half the members of its governing body, the executive council, were representatives of various governments, one-fourth were employers’ representatives and one-fourth were workers’ representatives. The first annual International Labor Conference, which convened in Washington, D.C., in October 1919, issued the organization’s first six conventions, which addressed, among other issues, limitations on working hours, unemployment, maternity protection and minimum working age. The following summer, the International Labor Office, the ILO’s permanent secretariat, was set up in Geneva, Switzerland.

Though the League of Nations faltered in the post-war years, the ILO flourished, even as its mission expanded from setting universal labor standards to guarding against more general human rights violations worldwide and facilitating technical cooperation to assist developing nations. In 1946, after the Second World War, the ILO became the first specialized agency associated with the League’s replacement, the United Nations (UN). The original membership of 45 countries in 1919 grew to 121 in 1971; two years earlier, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of its founding in April 1969, the ILO was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

www.historychannel.com
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45653

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2006 6:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Der deutsche Heeresbericht:
Einnahme von Béthincourt

Über 1100 Franzosen gefangen

Großes Hauptquartier, 10. April.
Westlicher Kriegsschauplatz:
In den gewonnenen Trichterstellungen südlich von St. Eloi wiesen unsere Truppen Wiedereroberungsversuche feindlicher Handgranatenabteilungen restlos ab. Die Minenkämpfe zwischen dem Kanal von La Bassée und Arras haben in den letzten Tagen wieder größere Lebhaftigkeit angenommen.
Auf dem Westufer der Maas wurden Béthincourt und die ebenso stark ausgebauten Stützpunkte "Alsace" und "Lorraine" südwestlich davon abgeschnürt. Der Gegner suchte sich der Gefahr durch schleunigen Rückzug zu entziehen, wurde von den Schlesiern aber noch gefaßt und büßte neben schweren blutigen Verlusten hier 14 Offiziere und rund 700 Mann an unverwundeten Gefangenen, 2 Geschütze und 13 Maschinengewehre ein. Gleichzeitig räumten wir uns unbequeme feindliche Anlagen, Blockhäuser und Unterstände an verschiedenen Stellen der Front aus, so dicht nördlich des Dorfes Avocourt und südlich des Rabenwaldes. Auch bei diesen Einzelunternehmungen gelang es, die Franzosen ernstlich zu schädigen; an Gefangenen verloren sie außerdem mehrere Offiziere, 276 Mann.
Rechts der Maas wurde in ähnlicher Weise eine Schlucht am Südwestrande des Pfefferrückens gesäubert. 4 Offiziere, 184 Mann und Material blieben in unseren Händen.
Weiter östlich und in der Woëvre fanden lediglich Artilleriekämpfe statt.
Im Luftkampf wurde südöstlich von Damloup und nordöstlich von Chateau-Salins je ein französisches Flugzeug abgeschossen. Die Insassen des ersteren sind tot. Je ein feindliches Flugzeug wurde im Absturz in das Dorf Loos und in den Caillettewald beobachtet.
Östlicher und Balkankriegsschauplatz:
Keine Ereignisse von besonderer Bedeutung.
www.stahlgewitter.com
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2006 7:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Events
1 1912 The Titanic departs Southampton on its maiden voyage
2 1919 Mexican revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata is assassinated



Births
1 1892 Paul Homo
2 1894 Alwin Thurm
3 1897 William Hodgkinson



Deaths
1 1918 Walter Göttsch
2 1976 Gerald Nash



Claims
1 1916 Walter Höhndorf #3
2 1917 David Tidmarsh #5
3 1918 Arthur Cobby #4
4 1918 Albert Carter #20
5 1918 Alfred Carter #11
6 1918 James Dawe #4
7 1918 Robert Grosvenor #8
8 1918 Siegfried Büttner #4
9 1918 Walter Göttsch #20
10 1918 Joseph Veltjens #11
11 1918 John Tudhope #9
12 1918 John Gilmour #13



Losses
1 1918 Walter Göttschkilled in action; shot down by British two-seater
2 1918 William Patrickshot down and captured
3 1918 Francis Magounwounded in action



http://www.theaerodrome.com/today/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 16:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1915
Western Front

French success in the Bois de Montmare (Woevre).

Eastern Front

Severe fighting for the Uzsok Pass (Carpathians).

Southern Front

Austrian gunboat shells Belgrade.

Albanians bombard Durazzo.

Naval and Overseas Operations

Belgian relief ship "Harpalyce" torpedoed.

Political, etc.

White Book published, containing correspondence between the British Government and the U.S. Ambassador on German treatment of prisoners of war and interned civilians.

German Note to U.S.A. protesting against the unneutral conduct of America.

Pope Benedict XV orders prayers for peace.

1916
Western Front

Battle of Verdun: Critical day; general German repulse on Meuse and Mort Homme, but slight German gain at Poivre Hill.

Germans gain ground at St. Eloi.

Southern Front

Sir C. Monro's Dardanelles despatch published.

Naval and Overseas Operations

Allies decide to form naval bases in Inionian Isles and the Aegean.

Political, etc.

Mr. Asquith defines Allied position in a speech to French deputies visiting London.

Lords Derby and Montagu resign from Air Committee.

Report on Wittenberg prisoners' camp published.

1917
Western Front

British complete capture of Vimy Ridge, occupy Farbus (north-east of Arras) and Fampaux (four miles east of Arras).

Great French bombardment of Moronvillers massif (group of hills east of Reims) begins.

Naval and Overseas Operations

British hospital ship "Salta" sunk by mine in Channel (52 drowned).

Severe explosion of ammunition factory at Eddystone, near Philadelphia.

Political, etc.

Proclamation, dated 9 April of Russian Provisional Government re: Russia and war aims.

Note of Argentina to U.S.A. approving of U.S.A. action re: war.

1918
Western Front

Battle extends northwards.

Germans reach left bank of Lys river.

From Estaires south to Givenchy position is maintained.

North of Armentieres, line forced back to Wytschaete, Messines Ridge and Ploegsteert; Armentieres evacuated with practically no loss.

Eastern Front

Siberia: Bolsheviks at Vladivostok reported to have fired on Japanese troops.

Asiatic and Egyptian Theatres

Palestine: Turco-German troops attack British position in coastal sector and after preliminary success are driven back, and British line is slightly advanced.

Naval and Overseas Operations

Monrovia (Liberia) bombarded by German submarine and wireless destroyed.

Political, etc.

Manpower Bill read second time (majority 223); order for thinning-out issued by Sir A. Geddes - to have effect on 24 April.

Rome: Conference of Oppressed Nationalities ends.

Canada: Bill appropriating �100,000,000 for war expenditure introduced.

1919
Aftermath of War

Rioting at Amritsar; 3 Europeans killed.

Bolsheviks retire on Ural front.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 16:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oorlogsdagboek van Remy Duflou
10 april 1916
Een Duitse vlieger wierp rond 9 uur 's avonds vijf bommen: één in 't hoveken van Achiel Pluym en twee in de nabijzijnde weide en haverland der hofstede van Jules Desomer. De andere bommen vielen te velde bij de hofsteden van de weduwe Bulckaert en August Lemahieu.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 16:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oorlogsdagboek van Remy Duflou
10 april 1917
Obussen vielen op het Brits kerkhof, langs de Hospitaalstraat en ook rond de Pottem.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 16:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oorlogsdagboek van Remy Duflou
10 april 1918
Van in de vroege morgen was er een hevige artilleriestrijd tussen Ieper en Armentiers (Armentières). Sinds acht dagen was er voortdurend mist!
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 17:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1917 - Coos Hartogh wordt geboren in Haarlem. Hartogh was een Nederlands verzetsstrijder tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog. Hij was één van de deelnemers aan de aanslag op het Amsterdams Bevolkingsregister in de nacht van 27 maart 1943.
Bron: milpedia
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 17:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1917: Munition factory explosion at Eddystone PA, kills 133 workers
1916: 1st professional golf tournament held
1913: President Woodrow Wilson throws out 1st ball, Senators beat Yankees 2-1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2010 17:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1919 – Mexican Revolution leader Emiliano Zapata is ambushed and shot dead by government forces in Morelos.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 9:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

10 april 1918
Deze bekende foto werd in Bethune genomen van slachtoffers, gemaakt door mosterdgas. De foto is ook in posterformaat te krijgen in IFFM
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
the beno



Geregistreerd op: 29-3-2009
Berichten: 2341
Woonplaats: Diksmuide

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 10:08    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Finnbar @ 10 Apr 2010 11:04 schreef:
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=11070

Wat heb ik misschien verkeerd gepost Confused
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 12:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

the beno @ 10 Apr 2010 11:08 schreef:
Finnbar @ 10 Apr 2010 11:04 schreef:
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=11070

Wat heb ik misschien verkeerd gepost Confused
Ben ook benieuwd... Confused
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 13:33    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

German 4th Army under pressure to try out the gas

Major-General Ilse Meets with Falkenhayn
On 10 April [1915] Major-General Ilse, the Chief of Staff of German 4th Army, was summoned to Supreme Headquarters at Charleville-Mézières for a meeting with General von Falkenhayn. At the meeting he was informed that the trial of the gas cloud was now urgent and that it should be carried out as quickly as possible. General Ilse was also informed that there was a possibility that the XXVI. Reserve Corps, which was set to carry out the attack, might be removed from the Western Front.
Major-General Ilse hurried back to the 4th Army headquarters in Thielt as the installation of the gas cylinders was almost finished in the alternative sector north of the Allied Ypres Salient.

Falkenhayn Uncertain about the Gas
According to Major-General Ilse the German 4th Army was being pressed to carry out the gas attack although General Falkenhayn was uncertain about its likely success. Indeed, by mid April General Falkenhayn had decided that any offensive plans for the Western Front would have to be put on hold and he had already shifted his focus to the Galician battlefront in the east.
In 1931 Major-General Ilse wrote a document about a discussion at a meeting between himself and General Falkenhayn at an unspecified date, presumed to be during March/April 1915. In the document Major-General Ilse maintained that Duke Albrecht, the 4th Army commander, had requested a division to be placed in reserve behind the attack. It was to be ready to move in and push deep into the Ypres Salient in order to roll up the Allied line once the breakthrough of the Allied front line had been achieved. According to Major-General Ilse the request was refused by General Falkenhayn for two reasons. First, he did not have that sort of 'spare' troop strength at his disposal and second, the success of the attack with the new gas was not one hundred percent certain. In addition to this, unfavourable weather could cause a major delay to the start of the attack for some weeks and General Falkenhayn did not have the resources to allow a complete division to be kept hanging around in reserve.

4th Army Re-allocates Troops as Reserves for the Attack
Because General Falkenhayn was not prepared to commit additional reserve troops to the 4th Army, the 4th Army headquarters in Thielt had removed the 43. Reserve Division from its own XXII. Reserve Corps on the Yser canal north of Ypres to use as a reserve force for the attack. When the attack was launched this division would be in position with three of its four infantry regiments and a field artillery brigade in the area of Roulers-Ingelmunster-Oostrosebeeke-Meulebeke-Ardoye (in the vicinity of Roulers, about 24 kilometres north-east of Ypres). The fourth regiment of the division was moved into the XV. Corps sector south-east of Ypres. A second reserve division, the Guard Cavalry Division, was placed in the area south of Bruges.

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/westfront/ypsalient/secondypres/prelude/ilse10april.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 13:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Admiralty 10th April 1915

The KING (is) pleased to give orders for the following appointments to the Distinguished Order, [...] to the undermentioned Officers in recognition of their services as mentioned -

To be Companions of the Distinguished Service Order

For services during the operations in the Shatt-el Arab, 3rd to 9th December, 1914, resulting in the capture of Qurnah-
Commander (now Captain) Wilfrid Nunn, Royal Navy. Commander Nunn displayed great coolness and skill in handling his ship under fire in difficult conditions of unsurveyed waters.

For services rendered in the aerial attack on Dunkirk, 23rd January, 1915-
Squadron Commander Richard Bell Davies
Flight Lieutenant Richard Edmund Charles Peirse
These Officers have repeatedly attacked the German submarine station at Ostend and Zeebrugge, being subjected on each occasion to heavy and accurate fire, their machines being frequently hit. In particular, on 23rd January, they each discharged eight bombs in an attack upon submarines alongside the mole at Zeebrugge, flying down to close range. At the outset of this flight Lieutenant Davies was severely wounded by a bullet in. the thigh, but nevertheless he accomplished his task, handling his machine for an hour with great skill in spite of pain and loss of blood.

For services in command of Torpedo Boat 043 during the operations on the Suez Canal, 3rd February, 1915-
Lieutenant Commander George Bryan Palmes, Royal Navy. Lieutenant Commander Palmes disabled a number of the enemy's boats intended to be used for crossing the Canal, and showed coolness and bravery under fire. He was severely wounded.

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLondonGazette1504.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 13:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

President Poincaré visits French troops in Flanders

On 10 April [1915] President Raymond Poincaré (1860-1934) left Paris with the French Minister of War Monsieur Alexandre Millerand (1859-1943) to make a visit to French troops at the northern end of the Western Front. On this particular five day trip President Poincaré visited the sector in Flanders held by the French to the north of Ypres.

At the Belgian Army headquarters the French President met with King Albert I (1875-1934), King of Belgium. Following a parade in his honour at Dunkirk, President Poincaré returned to Paris.

Raymond Poincaré was President of the Third French Republic for seven years from February 1913 until February 1920.

Etienne Alexandre Millerand was Minister of War until October 1915. He was President of France between 1920 and 1924.

King Albert was King of Belgium from 1909 to 1934. He was Commander-in-Chief of the Belgian Army. Under his leadership the Belgian Army had made a gallant stand against the invasion of his Kingdom by the German Imperial Army on 3 August 1914. The Belgian Army was forced to withdraw to the Flanders coast by the vastly superior number of troops in the German advance. Albert remained in Allied held territory at the Belgian Army Headquarters throughout the next three and a half years of static warfare on the northern end of The Western Front. In October 1918 he lead the Belgian Army to victory when it recaptured and liberated the Belgian coastal region from German occupation.


http://www.greatwar.co.uk/westfront/ypsalient/secondypres/prelude/poincare.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 13:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dick's Diary - The 1916 war diaries of 2nd Lieut. Richard T C Willis Fleming

10 April 1916 - by Dick on April 10, 1916
Away early this morning to the guns. General Parker came and watched us practicing in cooperation with the aircraft. We had to wait over an hour before we could get back across the pontoon, as a large caravan of camels of all sizes and colours had to come across before us and they took it very leisurely, in single file.

C.B. is over now, till another canteen gets gutted, so leave can start again. Kenning went to Cairo tonight for three days.

Bathed about half past three. After tea, Powell, Badcock and I and about ten beefy men from the column went to try and dig out a fox earth which Powell had found in a sandhill close to the camp. There wasn't much doubt about there being cubs there, you could see the scrabbles in the sand all round where they'd been playing. We made three big cuttings and got down about seven feet and then it got too dark to go on. We've smoothed the sand down quite flat all round so shall see if anything comes out during the night. An Egyptian fox would make a very good battery mascot.

Mosquitoes rather active again, the major got badly bitten last night, so I shall have a net over me tonight. The frogs are making an awful din tonight, the Sweet Water Canal is full of them.

http://www.willisfleming.org.uk/dicksdiary/entries/1916/04/monday-10-april-1916.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 13:54    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

First World War diary of William Fisher, 10th April - 17th April 1916

Monday, 10 April - Docks again

http://www.gtj.org.uk/en/small/item/25074//page/56/

Mooie site! "Gathering the Jewels features over 30,000 images of objects, books, letters, aerial photographs and other items from museums, archives and libraries throughout Wales."
Voor WOI-gerelateerde informatie op de site, ga naar http://www.gtj.org.uk/en/war-and-rebellion/first-world-war-1914-18/
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 14:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

April 10 – An ammunition factory explosion in Eddystone, Pennsylvania kills 133.

Eddystone has a history of heavy industry. It was the site of the largest Baldwin Locomotive Works plant (the smaller being in Spring Garden, Philadelphia). Baldwin was once the largest manufacturer of steam locomotives in the world. Today an Exelon generating station occupies some of the riverfront. A Boeing helicopter plant is adjacent to the northeast (outside the borough).

During World War I, Remington Arms opened the Eddystone Rifle Plant on Baldwin land with Baldwin management. Here it produced the Pattern 1914 rifle and M1917 Enfield rifle. Almost two-thirds of the rifles used by American soldiers in France in WWI were made at Eddystone. In January 1918 Remington Arms was absorbed by Midvale Steel and Ordnance Company, which took over the rifle plant.

Baldwin also formed a subsidiary company (Eddystone Ammunition Corporation) in 1915 to build artillery shells (Russian-model on British order).

On 10 April 1917, 133 people were killed in an explosion at the artillery shell plant. A monument near the Edgmont Avenue side of the Chester Rural Cemetery marks the final resting place for the remains of the unidentified victims, mostly women and young girls.

In 1917 the U.S. government also placed artillery shell orders, and bought out some of the assets of the Eddystone Ammunition Corporation. A new Corporation, the similarly named Eddystone Munitions Company, was formed by Baldwin to make the shrapnel for the shells.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddystone,_Pennsylvania
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 14:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Capture of Vimy Ridge

Because of its importance, the Germans had fortified Hill 145 with well-wired trenches and a series of deep dug-outs beneath its rear slope. The brigades of the 4th Division were hampered by fire from the Pimple, the other prominent height, which inflicted costly losses on the advancing waves of infantry. Renewed attacks were mounted using troops that were originally scheduled to attack the Pimple. Finally, in the afternoon of April 10, a fresh assault by a relieving brigade cleared the summit of Hill 145 and thus placed the whole of Vimy Ridge in Canadian hands. Two days later, units of the 10th Canadian Brigade successfully stormed the Pimple. By that time, the enemy had accepted the loss of Vimy Ridge as permanent and had pulled back more than three kilometres.

Vimy Ridge marked the only significant success of the Allied spring offensive of 1917. But though they had won a great tactical victory, the Canadians were unable to exploit their success quickly with a breakthrough, mainly because their artillery had bogged down and was unable to move up with them through the muddy, shell-torn ground. Instead, some Canadian artillerymen took over captured German guns which they had earlier been trained to fire.

http://wwii.ca/page9.html

John George Pattison

John George Pattison VC (September 8, 1875 – June 3, 1917), was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

One of four soldiers to earn the Victoria Cross at the Battle of Vimy Ridge, (the others were Thain Wendell MacDowell, Ellis Wellwood Sifton and William Johnstone Milne), Pattison was 41 years old, and a private in the 50th (Calgary) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 10 April 1917 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge when the advance of Canadian troops was held up by an enemy machine-gun which was inflicting severe casualties, Private Pattison, with utter disregard of his own safety, sprang forward and jumping from shell-hole to shell-hole, reached cover within thirty yards of the enemy gun. From this point, in the face of heavy fire he hurled bombs killing and wounding some of the crew, and then rushed forward overcoming and bayoneting the surviving five gunners. His initiative and valour undoubtedly saved the situation.

He was killed in action, Lens, France, on 3 June 1917. Grave/memorial at Buried at La Chaudière Military Cemetery, France. 7m N. of Arras. Plot IV. Row C. Grave 14. Headstone (shows age 42). His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Glenbow Museum (Calgary, Alberta, Canada).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_George_Pattison

Percy Allsup's Diary

April 10th - Orderly Sergeant. Big Advance on Vimy Ridge.

http://www.pals.org.uk/allsup_diary05.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 14:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van Baarle in de Eerste Wereldoorlog (1917)

10 april 1917 - De burgemeester van Baarle-Hertog vroeg de verzending van twee ton ongebuild tarwemeel (provisie van 0,25 frank per 100 kg) aan stoommeelfabrieken De Maas in Rotterdam. Te zenden naar de burgemeester, die verantwoordelijk was voor de bevoorrading. (Gemeentearchief Baarle-Hertog; 2.073.564 Register van Briefwisseling)

http://www.amaliavansolms.org/joomla15/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=190:08-kroniek-van-baarle-in-de-eerste-wereldoorlog-1917&catid=90:oorlog&Itemid=118
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 14:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

April 10, 1917: Sir William Robertson advocates to Haig the dispatch of immediate American expeditionary force "to get some Americans killed and so get the country to take a real interest in the war".

http://www.learningonline.com.au/topics/10/books/62/chapters/1283
Zie ook http://books.google.nl/books?id=YD5mB98vz7YC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 14:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Execution of Pte Henry Hughes (1891 - 1918)

No242904 1/5 Yorks and Lancs - 49 (West Riding) Division

Private Hughes unit was based in a hamlet called Potijze which was on the road that runs from Ypres, across the Frezenburg Ridge, to Zonnebeke in Belgium. Today it is really more an outer suburb of Ypres, but in 1914 it was quite separate, surrounding a large house that was used extensively by medical and artillery units. On 8th January 1918 Hughes was detailed to join a working party in the trenches near Hussar Camp, Potijze (Ieper) but instead he deserted his unit. Hughes, who was already under sentence death for deserting the previous December, was arrested on 8th February 1918 later at Poperinge a town which is situated about eight miles to the west of Ieper/Ypres. Poperinge at the time was used by the British Army as a gateway to the battlefields of the northern Ypres Salient. As well as being an important rail centre it was also used for the distribution of supplies, the billeting of troops, for casualty clearing stations and for troops enjoying rest from forward duties.

A Field General Court Martial (FGCM) was assembled on 19th March 1918. This form of Courts-Martial could only be convened if the accused was on active service or was stationed overseas. It had the full powers of a General Courts-Martial, although it could sit with a minimum of only three members, and even with two if no more officers were available. Field General Courts-Martial 's were used almost exclusively for trials on the Western Front during the war, and they imposed a total of over 3,000 death sentences—around 11 per cent of which were actually confirmed. At Hughes' hearing, the Commander of the 148th Brigade described Hughes as "from a fighting point of view of no value". He was summarily sentenced to death, a decision that was confirmed by the officers commanding the 49 (West Riding) Division and the XXII Corps and ultimately by the Supreme Commander, Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig himself. Twenty one days after the Court Martial Hughes was informed that he would be shot the next morning.

A Firing Squad under the command of Captain F.G. Smith, the Assistant Provost Marshal of the 49th Division, was assembled and at 5.50 a.m on 10th April 1918, Private Hughes was shot through the heart in accordance with the military code. The execution was carried out at the Klijtebeck stream at Millekapelle. All the trial papers refer to him as No242904 Pte J Hughes. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission commemorates him as No242904 Pte Henry Hughes, the 27 year old son of John Charles and Ellen Hughes of Sheffield.

This was the first execution that had taken place in the Division but Henry was the third person from Sheffield to have been executed. Henry was conscripted into the Army and was just one of 306 British soldiers who were executed during the First World War.

Lees verder! http://www.chrishobbs.com/henryhughes1918.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 15:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Korte berichten uit een eeuw Apeldoornse leven

B&W schaffen de kermis af
10 April [1920] - Met instemming zal het Apeldoornsch publiek in groote meerderheid kennis genomen hebben van het voornemen van Burgemeester en Wethouders om op te treden tegen de vertooning, dat midden in de kom der gemeente een kermis gehouden wordt. De mededeeling van de Burgemeester werd door den Raad met applaus begroet. We hebben de kermis gehad - gelukkig gehàd. De tweedaagsche October-feestelijkheid werd steeds minder een vermakelijkheid en steeds meer een dronkemansdag, totdat de kermissen in het eerste jaar van de mobilisatie een ziektecrisis doormaakten. Maar eenzelfde soort gelegenheid herleefde in de ,,kermissen op besloten terrein’’ met twijfelachtig vermaak, en door de kwasie-beslotenheid aan het toezicht der politie onttrokken. Van harte moet een optreden tegen deze soort vermakelijkheden worden toegejuicht, omdat inderdaad zulk een vertooning niet te tolereeren is.

http://members.chello.nl/~a.horlings/1918-1922.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 15:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Divisions involved in the Battle of Estaires, 9th – 11th April 1918

The Battle of Estaires, 9 – 11 April 1918, was one of the opening phases of the Battle of Lys.

The Struggle for Estaires.
Early in the morning of the 10th April, the enemy launched heavy attacks covered by artillery fire about the river crossings at Lestrem and Estaires, and succeeded in reaching the left bank at both places; but in each case he was driven back again by determined counter-attacks by the 50th Division. The enemy continued to exercise great pressure at Estaires, and fierce street fighting took place, in which both sides lost heavily. Machine guns, mounted by our troops in the upper rooms of houses, did great execution on has troops as they moved up to the attack, until the machine guns were knocked out by artillery fire. In the evening the German infantry once more forced their way into Estaires, and after a most gallant resistance the 50th Division withdrew at nighitfall to a prepared position to the north and west of the town. East of Estaires the enemy had already crossed the Lys in strength, with artillery in close support of his infantry, and by the evening had pressed back our troops to a position north of Steenwerck. Thereafter, the arrival of British reinforcements for the time being held up his advance.

http://oxfordshireandbuckinghamshirelightinfantry.wordpress.com/2010/01/24/the-division-involved-in-the-battle-of-estaires-9th-11th-april-1918/
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 15:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Star - Christchurch - 1918 - April - War News

Killed in Action - SOMMERVILLE
Major C.L.Sommerville, of Wanganui, killed in a ction was the son of late Colonel J.R.Sommerville -- he joined the Alexandra Cavalry on 20 September 1891, went to the Boer War -- was a farmer, on No 3 Line and became a Captain of the Alexandra Mounted Rifles. -- he leaves a widow.

Casualty - BAINBRIDGE
Private C. of the 24th reinforcements, brother of Mrs C.WINTER, 218 Opawa rd, is returning to NZ. He was wounded in France on 12 October, his twin brother Anthony was killed in action on 3 December.

Killed in Action - CLARKSON
Mr Emerson Clarkson of 34 papanui rd, his 2nd son William Francis was killed in a ction on 27 March prior to enlisting with the 4th Reinforcement was learning farming at Dunsandel -- fought at Gallipoli, wounded, fought in France, twice wounded Decemebr 1917-- was aged 22

Casualty - DINNIE
Sergeant Cecil Hay, son of Mr Walter Dinnie, ex-Commissioner of Police, -- very ill through gunshot wound in the right eye, now at 20th general Hosp. Dannes, camiers. left Wellington with the 8th Reinforcements -- went to Egypt, -- left for France --

Casualty
SIMPSON - Private John Irving, son of Mrs Simpson, 627 Gloucester st, who left with 8th reinforcements, was wounded in action in France on 1 April --

http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~ashleigh/War%20Snippets/1918.April.Star.Christchurch.War.News.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 16:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

10 April 1919, Commons Sitting

ADULTERY.


HC Deb 10 April 1919 vol 114 c2199 2199

Mr. HAILWOOD asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will introduce legislation to make adultery a criminal offence punishable by law, so that some little satisfaction may be given to those whose homes are violated and in order to discourage as far as possible recourse to what is known as the unwritten law?

Sir H. GREENWOOD The answer is in the negative.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/apr/10/adultery
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2010 16:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Cpl Guy Griffiths, USMC.

Born 26 December 1887 in Frankfort, Guy Griffiths was educated at Butler College, Ind, the Indiana Medical College and Northern Illinois College before gaining employment as a journalist. He enlisted into the US Marine Corps on 1 June 1917 at Cincinnati, Ohio and received training at Parris Island, SC before being sent to Quantico, Virginia. While stationed here, he died of nephritis on 10 April 1919 and is now buried in Crownland Cemetery, Noblesville.

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-people/remember-on-this-day/1229-10-april-cpl-guy-griffiths.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Image of the original passenger contract for the Swedish Immigrant Alfred Person, age 19, traveling from Gothenburg to Boston in April of 1914.



This is a passenger contract for a voyage from Gothenburg, Sweden to Boston, Massachusetts for Alfred Person, 19 years of age, traveling alone. He paid SEK 178.50 for Steerage / third class accommodations aboard an unnamed Cunard Line steamship. His voyage would have taken him from Gothenburg to Hull, England, typically on a small feeder vessel that served the Scandinavian coastal cities, where he would have boarded a train across England to Liverpool. At Liverpool, he would have boarded one of the larger Cunard ocean liners for the voyage on to Boston, Massachusetts.

http://www.gjenvick.com/Immigration/ImmigrantTickets/1914-04-10-SteeragePassengerContract.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Postcard from Emmy Noether to E. Fischer. Postmarked 10 April 1915.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Emmy_noether_postcard_1915.jpg
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Charles Edwin Woodrow Bean

(...) Bean disembarked with the AIF at Alexandria in Egypt in December 1914 and spent most of the next four months at the army's training camp in Mena. Phillip Schuler, the correspondent sent by the Melbourne Age, was there at the same time. Bean alone was able to join the Australian troops when they sailed for the Dardanelles on 10 April 1915, because of his official status, although this was dependent on confirmation by the British. He left with his trademark items, a small portable Corona typewriter brought from Australia and a military telescope purchased in Cairo for £4.6.0 and described on his expense account as 'indispensable'. (...)

http://www.nla.gov.au/gallipolidespatches/2-1-1-bean.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:26    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Revival of the Olympic Games: Pierre de Coubertin

Coubertin, [...] on 23 June, 1894 [...] founded the International Olympic Committee in a ceremony held at the University of Sorbonne in Paris. Demetrius Vikelas from Greece became the first president of the IOC.

Two years later, in 1896, the first Olympic Games of the modern era were held in Athens. On that occasion Coubertin was elected the second president of the IOC and he remained president until 1925. Due to the 1st World War, Coubertin requested permission to establish the headquarters of the IOC in Lausanne, Switzerland, which was a neutral country.

On 10 April, 1915 the acts ensuring the establishment of the international administrative centre and archives of the modern Olympic movement were signed in the Town Hall of Lausanne.

http://en.beijing2008.cn/spirit/movement/evolution/n214070931.shtml
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:32    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Parental consent to Jimmy serving overseas, 10 April 1915, Amelia Martin







http://vrroom.naa.gov.au/records/?ID=19346
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Obituary of Jane Sandanski



The legendary warrior

Jane Iv. Sandanski

“Starikt” “Pirin Tsar”.
Born 1874 in the village of Vlahi in the Melnik district, due to 20 years of fight for freeing the Macedonian slave, was killed on 10 of April 1915 in Pirin, in the district of “Baba”, alas**, by the evil doing hand of the Bulgarians
.

http://makedonika.wordpress.com/2008/03/17/the-murder-of-the-macedonian-revolutionary-jane-sandanski-1915/
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:40    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Oorlogsbrieven van Duitse Studenten: Brief van Gerhart Pastors - 10 april 1915

St. Maurice, den 10den April 1915.

Wat ik in de laatste weken beleefd heb, drukt het eene woord: Combres uit. Vooral met Paschen ging het daar stormachtig toe, van den vijfden April af. Beroerd weer, koud, regenachtig. In de loopgraven op de hoogte 30 tot 40 c.M. water en slijk. Onze kleeren, een formatie van leem, door en door nat, zogen zich vast en drukten op onze verstijfde ledematen. Niet alleen onze muts was nat, maar ook onze haren, niet alleen onze beenen, maar ook onze voeten in de laarzen. En zoo moesten wij eens vierentwintig uur achter elkaar het zien uit te houden. Dan uren lang, een ontzettend granaatvuur, zoodat men waanzinnig dreigde te worden en dan tot slot een stormaanval der Franschen, die uitliep op een bloedig handgemeen. Zoo ging het dagen lang — duizenden lijken. De gevechten in de loopgraven zijn iets onbeschrijflijk afschuwelijks. Dikwijls schieten meer dan honderd kanonnen op loopgraven, die de vijand precies kent en weet.
Dan worden, om een woord van Frederik den Groote te gebruiken, de ingewanden van ijzer en het hart van staal. Het kan ook niet anders. En dat is goed. Je wordt sterk. Dit leven veegt in zijn storm al het zwakke en sentimenteele weg. Je wordt aan ketens geklonken, je verliest het doel van je menschelijk leven uit het oog, maar je wordt geoefend in lijden, in zelfbeheersching en tucht.
Op de eerste plaats echter: je wordt innerlijker. Want je verdraagt dat bestaan, die verschrikkingen, dat moorden alléén, als de geest zijn wortels in hooger sferen slaat. Je moet aan je eigen lot denken, je wordt gedwongen aan den dood te denken en in die gedachte te berusten. Je grijpt — als tegenhanger van de ontzettende werkelijkheid — naar het edelste en hoogste. Je zou naar de ziel ten gronde gaan, als je niet het geloof had aan een rechtvaardig besturende macht, een bovenaardsche macht en daarom vindt je dat geloof ook, en daarom zullen wij, soldaten, de apostelen van een sterk geloof in God zijn, — en dat geloof aan God brengt ons van zelf tot een sterk geloof in ons volk en dat geloof weer tot een unnige liefde en die liefde tot een groote bereidwilligheid, zich op te offeren.
O, hoe we ons als Duitschers voelen! Met dezelfde vrome aandacht als een oud moedertje den Bijbel leest, lees ik de brieven van Frederik den Groote. Wat is dat verheven! Mijne liefde voor den ouden Frits is zonder grenzen. Het boekje moest voor iederen ontwikkelden Duitscher, vooral voor den Pruis, een lievelingslektuur worden.
Luther, Bismarck, Dürer, Goethe — heel een sterrenhemel glanst in ons. Een toeval heeft mij de plaat van Dürer: Ridder, Dood en Duivel, in kleinen fijnen afdruk in de hand gespeeld. Dat is mijn grootste schat. In de grootsten van het volk zoek ik de ziel van ons volk. Als soldaat heb ik mijn leven geofferd voor het behoud en voor den groei en bloei van ons volk.

Gerhart Pastors

http://www.wereldoorlog1418.nl/brieven/07brief-pastors.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:45    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mormon History - Joseph F. Smith Blaming Women for Mormon Men's Spiritual Shortcomings - 1916



http://www.truthandgrace.com/1916NYTimes0410.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Private Robert Aldham Wilson of the 50th Battalion.



He had been in the line only a few months when he was instantly killed in action on April 10, 1917, in an attack during the Canadian offensive in front of Vimy Ridge.

http://www.kingandempire.com/v_time10.html
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:56    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Philip Gibbs on the Battle of Vimy Ridge, April 1917

Reproduced below is the text of British war journalist Philip Gibbs' report detailing the Canadians' success in seizing the heights forming the German stronghold of Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917. As a consequence of the hard fighting experienced during the battle - and partly in public recognition of the Allied success - some four Victoria Crosses were awarded following the battle.

British War Reporter Philip Gibbs on the Battle of Vimy Ridge, 9-10 April 1917

Today, at dawn, our armies began a great battle, which, if Fate has any kindness for the world, may be the beginning of the last great battles of the war.

Our troops attacked on a wide front between Lens and St. Quentin, including the Vimy Ridge, that great, grim hill which dominates the plain of Douai and the coalfields of Lens and the German positions around Arras.

In spite of bad fortune in weather at the beginning of the day, so bad that there was no visibility for the airmen, and our men had to struggle forward in a heavy rainstorm, the first attacks have been successful, and the enemy has lost much ground, falling back in retreat to strong rearguard lines, where he is now fighting desperately.

The line of our attack covers a front of some 12 miles southwards from Givenchy-en-Gohelle, and is a sledge-hammer blow, threatening to break the northern end of the Hindenburg line, already menaced round St. Quentin.

As soon as the enemy was forced to retreat from the country east of Bapaume and Peronne, in order to escape a decisive blow on that line, he hurried up divisions and guns northwards to counter our attack there, while he prepared a new line of defence, known as the Wotan line, as the southern part of the Hindenburg line, which joins it, is known as the Siegfried position, after two great heroes of old German mythology.

He hoped to escape there before our new attack was ready, but we have been too quick for him, and his own plans were frustrated.

So today began another titanic conflict which the world will hold its breath to watch because of all that hangs upon it. I have seen the fury of this beginning, and all the sky on fire with it, the most tragic and frightful sight that men have ever seen, with an infernal splendour beyond words to tell. The bombardment which went before the infantry assault lasted for several days, and reached a great height yesterday, when, coming from the south, I saw it for the first time.

Those of us who knew what would happen today, the beginning of another series of battles greater, perhaps, than the struggle of the Somme, found ourselves yesterday filled with a tense, restless emotion, and some of us smiled with a kind of tragic irony because it was Easter Sunday.

In the little villages behind the battle lines the bells of the French churches were ringing gladly because the Lord had risen, and on the altar steps the priests were reciting the splendid old words of faith. "Resurrexi et adhuc tecum sum. Alleluia" ("I have arisen and I am with thee always. Alleluia").

The earth was glad yesterday. For the first time this year the sun had a touch of warmth in it, though patches of snow still stayed white under the shelter of the banks, and the sky was blue and the light glinted on wet tree-trunks and in the furrows of the new-ploughed earth. As I went up the road to the battle lines I passed a battalion of our men, the men who are fighting today, standing in hollow square with bowed heads while the chaplain conducted the Easter service.

Easter Sunday, but no truce of God. I went to a field outside Arras and looked into the ruins of the cathedral city. The cathedral itself stood clear in the sunlight, with a deep black shadow where its roof and aisles had been. Beyond was a ragged pinnacle of stone, once the glorious Town Hall, and the French barracks and all the broken streets going out to the Cambrai road. It was hell in Arras, though Easter Sunday.

The bombardment was now in full blast. It was a beautiful and devilish thing, and the beauty of it, and not the evil of it, put a spell upon one's senses. All our batteries, too many to count, were firing, and thousands of gun flashes were winking and blinking from hollows and hiding-places, and all their shells were rushing through the sky as though flocks of great birds were in flight, and all were bursting over the German positions with long flames which rent the darkness and waved sword-blades of quivering light along the ridges.

The earth opened, and great pools of red fire gushed out. Star shells burst magnificently, pouring down golden rain. Mines exploded east and west of Arras and in the wide sweep from Vimy Ridge to Blangy southwards, and voluminous clouds, all bright with a glory of infernal fire, rolled up to the sky.

The wind blew strongly across, beating back the noise of the guns, but the air was all filled with the deep roar and slamming knocks of the single heavies and the drum fire of the field guns.

The hour for attack was 5.30. Officers were looking at their wrist watches as on a day in July last year. The earth lightened. A few minutes before 5.30 the guns almost ceased fire, so that there was a strange and solemn hush. We waited, and pulses beat faster than the second hands.

"They're away," said a voice by my side. The bombardment broke out again with new and enormous effects of fire and sound. The enemy was shelling Arras heavily, and black shrapnel and high explosive came over from his lines, but our gunfire was twenty times as great. Around the whole sweep of his lines green lights rose. They were signals of distress, and his men were calling for help.

It was dawn now, but clouded and storm-swept. A few airmen came out with the wind tearing at their wings, but could see nothing in the mist and driving rain. I went down to the outer ramparts of Arras. The suburb of Blangy seemed already in our hands. On the higher ground beyond our men were fighting forward. I saw two waves of infantry advancing against the enemy's trenches, preceded by our barrage of field guns.

They went in a slow, leisurely way, not hurried, though the enemy's shrapnel was searching for them. "Grand fellows," said an officer lying next to me on the wet slope. "Oh, topping!"

Fifteen minutes afterwards groups of men came back. They were British wounded and German prisoners. I met the first of these walking wounded afterwards. They were met on the roadside by medical officers, who patched them up there and then before they were taken to the field hospitals in ambulances.

From these men, hit by shrapnel and machine-gun bullets, I heard the first news of progress. They were bloody and exhausted, but claimed success. "We did fine," said one of them. "We were through the fourth lines before I was knocked out."

"Not many Germans in the first trenches," said another, "and no real trenches either after shelling. We had knocked their dug-outs out, and their dead were lying thick, and the living ones put their hands up." All the men agreed that their own casualties were not high, and mostly wounded.

The Next Day

By three in the afternoon yesterday the Canadians had gained the whole of the ridge except a high strong post on the left, Hill 145, which was captured during the night. Our gunfire had helped them by breaking down all the wire, even round Heroes' Wood and Count's Wood, where it was very thick and strong. Thelus was wiped utterly off the map.

This morning Canadian patrols pushed in a snowstorm through the Farbus Wood, and established outposts on the railway embankment. Some of the bravest work was done by the forward observing officers, who climbed to the top of Vimy Ridge as soon as it was captured, and through a sea of heavy barrage reported back to the artillery all the movements seen by them on the country below.

In spite of the wild day, our flying men were riding the storm and signalling to the gunners who were rushing up their field guns. "Our 60-pounders," said a Canadian officer, "had the day of their lives." They found many targets. There were trains moving in Vimy village, and they hit them. There were troops massing on the sloping ground, and they were shattered. T here were guns and limbers on the move, and men and horses were killed.

Beyond all the prisoners taken yesterday by the English, Scottish and Canadian troops, the enemy losses were frightful, and the scenes behind his lines must have been and still be hideous in slaughter and terror.

The Battle of Arras is the greatest victory we have yet gained in this war and a staggering blow to the enemy. He has lost already nearly 10,000 prisoners and more than half a hundred guns, and in dead and wounded his losses are great.

He is in retreat south of the Vimy Ridge to defensive lines further back, and as he goes our guns are smashing him along the roads. It is a black day for the German armies and for the German women who do not know yet what it means to them.

During last night the Canadians gained the last point, called Hill 145, on the Vimy Ridge, where the Germans held out in a pocket with machine guns, and this morning the whole of that high ridge, which dominates the plains to Douai, is in our hands, so that there is removed from our path the great barrier for which the French and ourselves have fought through bloody years.

Yesterday, before daylight and afterwards, I saw this ridge of Vimy all on fire with the light of great gunfire. The enemy was there in strength, and his guns were answering ours with a heavy barrage of high explosives.

This morning the scene was changed as by a miracle. Snow was falling, blown gustily across the battlefields and powdering the capes and helmets of our men as they rode or marched forward to the front. But presently sunlight broke through the storm-clouds and flooded all the countryside by Neuville-St. Vaast and Thelus and La Folie Farm up to the crest of the ridge where the Canadians had just fought their way with such high valour.

Our batteries were firing from many hiding-places, revealed by the short, sharp flashes of light, but few answering shells came back, and the ridge itself, patched with snowdrifts, was as quiet as any hill of peace.

It was astounding to think that not a single German stayed up there out of all the thousands who had held it yesterday, unless some poor wounded devils still cower in the great tunnels which pierce the hillside.

Source Records of the Great War, Vol. V, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/vimy_gibbs.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 22:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Canadian War Records Office on the Battle of Vimy Ridge, April 1917

Reproduced below is the text of the official announcement by the Canadian War Records Office, dated April 1917, announcing the Canadians' success in seizing the heights forming the German stronghold of Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.

As a consequence of the hard fighting experienced during the battle - and partly in public recognition of the Allied success - some four Victoria Crosses were awarded following the battle.

Official Announcement by the Canadian War Records Office on the Battle of Vimy Ridge, April 1917

Again the Canadians have "acquired merit."

In the capture of Vimy Ridge on April 9th, as in the lesser action of Courcelette in September of last year, they have shown the same high qualities in victorious advance as they displayed in early days in desperate resistance on many stricken fields.

At half-past five on Easter Monday morning the great attack was launched with terrible fire from our massed artillery and from many field guns in hidden advanced positions.

Our "heavies" bombarded the enemy positions on and beyond the ridge, and trenches, dugouts, emplacements, and roads, which for long had been kept in a continual state of disrepair by our fire, were now smashed to uselessness. An intense barrage of shrapnel from our field guns, strengthened by the indirect fire of hundreds of machine guns, was laid along the front.

At the same moment the Canadian troops advanced in line, in three waves of attack. Flurries of snow drifted over the battlefield as the Canadians left their jumping-off trenches behind the rolling barrage. T he light was sufficient for manoeuvring purposes and yet obscure enough to obstruct the range of vision and lessen the accuracy of fire of the German riflemen and machine gunners.

The troops on the extreme left made a start under conditions as favourable as those in the centre and right, but they were soon confronted by a strong and constantly strengthening opposition. The advance of these troops was soon checked between its first and second lines of objectives by heavy fighting, which was more formidable against the centre of the line than against the flanks.

A dip in the ground caused a change of direction, which swung these troops off their central objectives. They reached their goals on the flanks, only to find themselves subjected to heavy, close-range fire of machine guns and rifles.

To be enfiladed from the centre and the north was bad enough, but to add to the situation, caves, or a tunnel, in the hostile line over which we had already advanced now disgorged Germans, who promptly reoccupied their old front and opened fire on our rear. The enemy at these points fought with unusual vigour and resolution.

These troops on the extreme left fought all day against the Huns, and by 10 o'clock at night succeeded in disposing of the enemy in their rear and capturing the major portion of the enemy trenches in their centre. "The Pimple," in the north, still remained to the enemy, but by then snow was falling heavily and it was wisely decided to consolidate the hard-won gains and prepare for a counter-attack rather than to undertake a further assault that night.

"The Pimple" would keep for the morrow.

In the meantime the other troops fought forward to one line after another without serious check, but with many brisk encounters and not without casualties. Most of these were the result of shrapnel fire, only a small percentage were fatal, and the majority of the wounds were of a minor character.

On the German second line the troops drew breath and consolidated their gains. Our barrage was laid before them steady as a wall. Fresh troops came up and deployed into position. They waited for the barrage to lift at the ordained minute and lead them on. The enemy's artillery fire - their counter-barrage and bombardment of our gun positions - was not strong as strength in such things is considered today.

Prisoners were already hurrying to our rear in hundreds, pathetically and often ludicrously grateful to the fortunes of war that had saved them alive for capture. They surrendered promptly and willingly.

The barrage lifted, and the two divisions on the right followed it forward to the German third line. Here again they paused for a time, then advanced again, behind the ever-ready and unslackening barrage, for a distance of about 1,200 yards.

This advance included the capture of several villages, Hill 140, a number of fortified woods, and several trenches and belts of wire. And still the enemy surrendered by hundreds and scuttled rearward to safety. Their resistance grew feebler, their hands more eager to relinquish their weapons and ascend high above their heads, at each stage of our advance.

At 10 o'clock snow fell heavily from black clouds sweeping low across the ridge. Half an hour later the snow ceased, the clouds thinned, and the sun shone fitfully over the shattered and clamorous battlefield.

Word was received at the advanced headquarters that the British division on our immediate right was enjoying a degree of success in its operations equal to the Canadian success.

Events continued to develop with rapidity and precision. By 1 o'clock every point in the enemy's third line of our objectives had been reached and secured. By this time the troops on the right had consolidated their gains and advanced strong patrols. From their new positions they commanded a wide view of enemy territory to the eastward.

They reported a massing of Germans on a road in the new field of vision, and our heavy guns immediately dealt with the matter. By noon one of the battalions of a division had received and dealt drastically with three counter-attacks. Its front remained unshaken.

Shortly after this the Canadian Corps was able to state that the prisoners already to hand numbered three battalion commanders, 15 other officers, and snore than 2,000 non-commissioned officers and men - with plenty more in sight - making for our "cages" as fast as their legs could carry them.

The final stage of the attack of the troops on the right was now made. They passed through the wide belts of enemy wire which fringed the plateau by way of wide gaps torn by our heavy artillery at fixed intervals. So they issued on the eastern slopes of Vimy Ridge - the first allied troops to look down upon the level plain of Douai since the German occupation in 1914.

They saw the villages of Farbus, Vimy, and Petit Vimy at their feet, and beyond these the hamlets of Willerval, Bailleul, Oppy, and Mericourt. They pressed on to Farbus Wood and Goulot Wood, and possessed themselves of several hostile batteries and much ammunition.

By an early hour of the afternoon all our objectives, save those of the left of the attack, were in our possession, and the task of consolidating and strengthening our gains was well in hand. Throughout the day the most courageous and devoted cooperation was rendered to the Canadian Corps by a brigade and a squadron of the Royal Flying Corps.

The night saw all of Vimy Ridge, with the exception of a few trenches on Hill 145, secure in Canadian hands.

Source Records of the Great War, Vol. V, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/vimy_warrecordsoffice.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 23:01    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

LIST OF HOSPITAL SHIPS DESTROYED BY SUBMARINES OR MINES

H.S. "SALTA."- Mined on morning of the 10th April, 1917, just outside Havre ; no patients on board ; 5 officers (including the officer-in-charge), 9 nursing sisters, and 37 other ranks R.A.M.C., were lost with the ship.

http://www.vlib.us/medical/hospships.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 23:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

William Beach Thomas reported the offensive at Arras in the Daily Mail (10th April, 1917)

Near Arras our troops leapt to the attack in the midst of such artillery fire as the world has never seen. It was accompanied by an onslaught of strange engines of war, while overhead, as soon as the clouds allowed, our aeroplanes, moving at 130 miles an hour, rushed to tackle any German machines they could find.

From this vantage-point, where the full panorama from Vimy to Tilloy was etched in flames, I write immediately after watching the first storming. It is too early to give more than partial news, but the famous divisions directly in front of me, both of which I had before seen throw themselves on an entrenched and buttressed enemy, went straight through to their goal.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWarras.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 23:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

"The fighting Leanes of Prospect"



The five Leane brothers, who all served in the First AIF. From Left to Right, standing: Major Ben Leane (48th Battalion, Killed in Action 10 April 1917), Lieutenant Colonel Ray Leane (CO of the 48th Battalion), WO I Ernest Leane (27th Battalion). Sitting: Major Edwin Leane D.A.D.O.S. 2nd Australian Division), Major Allan Leane (CO of the 28th Battalion, Killed in Action 4 January 1917)

http://www.iwm.org.uk/upload/package/2/gallipoli/anzacshell.htm
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 16124
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Apr 2011 23:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

British 55th (West Lancashire) Division troops blinded by tear gas await treatment at an
Advanced Dressing Station near Bethune during the Battle of Estaires, 10 April 1918




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:British_55th_Division_gas_casualties_10_April_1918.jpg
_________________

“I hope you live a life you are proud of. If you find that you are not, l hope you have the strength to start all over again.
- F. Scott Fitzgerald
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Tandorini



Geregistreerd op: 11-6-2007
Berichten: 7019

BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Apr 2011 8:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Op 10 april 1896 wordt Jean-Baptiste Piron te Couvin geboren.

Deelname Eerste Wereldoorlog:
Quote:
In 1913, op de leeftijd van 17 jaar, werd hij aangenomen aan de Militaire School, 64e Promotie - Infanterie.

In 1914, tijdens de mobilisatie, vervoegde hij het 2de Linie Regiment in het garnizoen van Gent waar men hem een peloton toevertrouwde van de 2de Compagnie van het 2de Bataljon.

De 18e augustus 1914, onderging hij zijn 1ste oorlogservaring te velde in Houtem-St-Marguerite. Hij nam deel aan de slag om de Yzer.

De 26 maart 1916, werd hij gepromoveerd tot de graad van luitenant.
In december 1916, vervoegde hij het 22e Linie Regiment.

In oktober 1917, werd hij gehospitaliseerd in Cabourg (blinde darm). Tijdens de niet operationele periode diende hij niet meer voor de infanterie, hij werd onderverdeeld bij het vliegwezen als waarnemen (6de Herkenning Eskadron van Houtem).

De 11 augustus 1918, werd hij gewond tengevolge van een geforceerde landing. Na een korte hospitalisatie vervoegde hij zijn eskadron.


Later tijdens WO II zou hij de BRIGADE "PIRON" oprichten, op 8 augustus 1944 land de Brigade op de Normandische stranden onder bevel van de 6th Airborne Division / 1st Canadian Army. Op 28 augustus komen ze onder bevel van de 49th British Divison te staan.
Op 3 september 1944 om 04.36u rijden ze de Belgische grens over te Rogny. Op 4 september worden ze te Brussel door een uitzinnige menigte verwelkomd. In Nederland helpen ze mee aan de bevrijding van Walcheren en in de Betuwe. Later wordt de Brigade herdoopt in "Bataljon Bevrijding".

NATIONALE EERVOLLE ONDERSCHEIDINGEN
· Acht Frontstreepen
· Oorlogskruis met de Palm
· Overwinningsmedaille
· Herinneringsmedaille van de Oorlog 1914 - 1918
· Medaille van de Strijder-Vrijwilliger 1914 - 1918
· Vergulde Leeuw op het lint van het Oorlogskruis 1914 - 1918
· Ridder der Kroonorde
· Ridder der Leopoldsorde
· Hondersteverjarig Medaille
· Vuurkruis
· Officier der Leopoldsorde
· Militair Kruis 2de klasse
· Officier der Orde van Leopold II met Zwaarden
· Militair Kruis 1ste klasse.
· Commandeur der Kroonorde
· Grootkruis der Kroonorde met de Palm
· Oorlogskruis 1940 met de Palm
· Commandeur der Leopoldsorde
· Herinneringsmedaille 1940 - 1945 met twee gekruiste sabels
· Grootofficier der Leopoldsorde

BUITENLANDSE ERETEKENS
· Order of Companion honorary of the Distinguished (Groot-Brittanië)
· Croix d'Officier de la Légion d'Honneur ( Frankrijk)
· Croix de guerre française avec palme (Frankrijk)
· Croix de Commandeur de l'Ordre Grand Ducal de la Couronne de Chêne(Luxemburg)
· Croix de Commandeur de la Légion d'Honneur (Frankrijk)
· Grande Croix de l'Ordre d'Adolphe de Nassau (Luxemburg)
· Grande croix de l'Ordre d'Orange Nassau avec glaives (Nederland)
· Croix de l'Ordre du Mérite Militaire TAIGUK (Korea)
· Defence Medal (Groot-Brittanië)
· France and Germany Star (Frankrijk)
· 1939 - 1945 Star (Groot-Brittanië)
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group