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The Salvation Army in WW1

 
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Jun 2008 7:01    Onderwerp: The Salvation Army in WW1 Reageer met quote

THE HISTORY
OF THE
SALVATION ARMY
IN
WORLD WAR I

The Salvationist stands ready, trained in all necessary qualifications in every phase of humanitarian work, and the the last man will stand by the President for execution of his orders.

Evangeline Booth, National Commander, April 1918


© Great War Society
The popularity that came to The Salvation Army as a result of its overseas work during World War I was greatly out of proportion to the quantity - though not to the quality - of its service. [The entire overseas assignment of officers was 241 men and women, with supplemental workers bringing the total to about 500 individuals. These were backed-up by 268 members in the United States.] In France the Salvation army won the affection of the doughboy and the gratitude and respect of the whole nation, yet the spirit of those Salvationists who went to France was no different from those who stayed in America and ran slum nurseries, homes for destitute men and women, or other similar programs. But the eyes of the nation were turned to France; the thoughts of the nation were with its men on the battlefields; and there millions of Americans learned of the spirit of the Salvation Army for the first time.

The Salvation Army won its recognition during World War I for its work overseas. A happy choice for director of war work in France was Lieutenant Colonel William S. Barker, who left New York with Adjutant Bertram Rodda on June 30, 1917, to survey the situation in France. Armed with a letter of recommendation from Joseph P. Tumulty, President Wilson's secretary, Barker was received by the American Ambassador to France, who arranged for him to see General Pershing.


Meanwhile, in the United States, preparations were underway to follow the boys overseas. Evangeline Booth, National Commander of The Salvation Army, borrowed $25,000 to finance the beginning of the work, and later another $100,000 was borrowed from International Headquarters. Financial support for Salvation Army war work was slow at the beginning; but, as the Commander said, "It is only a question of our getting to work in France and the American public will see that we have all the money we want." {Eventually, over $12.5 million would be contributed for their work.]

Colonel Barker cabled from France to send over some lassies. Commander Evangeline Booth was greatly surprised but, having confidence in Barker, she included some carefully selected women officers in the first group sent to France. The work of the "Sallies" justified Barker's wisdom in making the request.

Lees verder op:
http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/salvhist.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Jun 2008 7:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote



http://eu.art.com/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Jun 2008 7:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

SA Women in Times Of War

Salvation Army women went above and beyond the call of duty in times of war. Many veterans sing the praises of The Salvation Army lassies who served during wartime.



It was during WWI that The Salvation Army won worldwide recognition for its war work overseas. Evangeline Booth, National Commander at the time, borrowed $25,000 to finance the beginning of the Army’s war work. Later, she borrowed another $100,000 from International Headquarters in London to keep the work going. Evangeline firmly believed that the American people would support the cause, and eventually over twelve and a half million dollars was raised to pay for the war work.



During WWI Salvation Army personnel overseas numbered only about 500 men and women, each dedicated to Christ and to the cause for which they had enlisted. Ensign Helen Purviance and her side–kick Ensign Margaret Sheldon, are credited with making the first doughnuts of WWI. They were cooked over a potbellied stove in a small frying pan that held only seven at a time. Only 150 were served on the first day, but in time they had the proper equipment and fried up to 9,000 doughnuts daily. The troops loved the doughnuts and soon the lassies were referred to as Doughnut Girls.



Frying doughnuts was only one of the services rendered to the soldiers in France. The lassies sewed on buttons, wrote letters home, held their hands during surgery and prayed with them before they went into battle.

© http://www.womensministries-tsa.org/WMP_RememberingourPast.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 07 Jun 2008 7:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

National Doughnut Day

When : Always the first Friday in June

National Doughnut Day honors the Salvation Army "Lassies" of WWI. It is also used as a fund raiser for needy causes of the Salvation Army.

The original Salvation Army Doughnut was first served by Salvation Army in 1917. During WWI, Salvation Army "lassies" were sent to the front lines of Europe. These brave volunteers made home cooked foods, and provided a moral boost to the troops. Often, the doughnuts were cooked in oil inside the of the metal helmet of an American soldier. The American infantrymen were commonly called doughboys. Salvation Army lassies were the only women outside of military personnel allowed to visit the front lines. Lt. Colonel Helen Purviance is considered the Salvation Army's "first doughnut girl".

On National Doughnut Day, look to see if your local doughnut shop, or other organizations, are offering free donuts to solicit donations for the Salvation Army or for another needy cause. If you find them, please be generous.

Note: The word "Doughnut" is often shortened to "Donut. So, if you see the term National Donut Day, its the same day.

The Origin of National Doughnut Day:

National Doughnut Day was established in 1938 by the Chicago Salvation Army to raise much-needed funds during the Great Depression, and to honor the work of World War I Salvation Army volunteers who prepared doughnuts and other foods for thousands of soldiers.

© http://www.holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/June/doughnutday.htm
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